About

There are numerous ways to control and treat atrial fibrillation, including medicines and interventions done by your cardiologist with a catheter. There is also surgery. The surgical intervention to treat atrial fibrillation is called the MAZE procedure. The goal of the MAZE procedure is to do the following:

  • Wear away the arrhythmia
  • Restore synchrony between the atria and the ventricles
  • Preserve organized atrial contraction

Through the strategic placement of incisions in both atria, the circular electrical patterns that are responsible for this arrhythmia are interrupted and consequently the formation and conduction of errant electrical impulses is stopped. Scar tissue generated by the incisions permanently blocks the travel routes of the erroneous electrical impulses that cause atrial fibrillation eliminating the arrhythmia. The heart's natural pacemaker originating in the SA node will resume with the normal electrical impulse.

Treatments

Cardiac Ablation

Other Cardiac Surgery Procedures

Here at University of Utah Health Care this procedure is performed in conjunction with other cardiac surgery procedures like the following:

Atrial Fibrillation

What is atrial fibrillation?

Normally, the heart pumps in a well-timed fashion. The two upper chambers (atria) contract first followed by the two lower chambers (ventricles). This coordinated pumping is powered by the heart's own electrical system and efficiently pumps blood out to the body and back. In atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of arrhythmia, the electrical signals fire rapidly and chaotically. This causes the atria to quiver instead of contracting normally. Many of the signals also reach the ventricles, causing them to contract irregularly too. This results in a fast and irregular heart rhythm. Over time, this can weaken the heart and lead to heart failure. Plus, when the atria do not contract effectively, the blood may pool in the heart. This increases the risk that a blood clot may form and travel to the brain causing a stroke. People with AF are 5 to 7 times more likely to have a stroke than people who do not have AF.

AF is more common in people who are over 65 and is seen more often in men than women.

What are the symptoms of atrial fibrillation?

You may not have symptoms with AF. But, when ventricles are not able to pump enough blood out to the lungs and body, it can cause these symptoms:

  • Heart palpitations or fluttering in the chest

  • Chest pain

  • Shortness of breath

  • Fatigue

  • Anxiety

  • Dizziness and faintness

Some people with AF have intermittent episodes (intermittent or paroxysmal AF). Others have chronic or persistent AF.

What causes atrial fibrillation?

AF can develop when someone who has underlying heart disease, such as heart valve disease, heart attack, or heart failure. High blood pressure, thyroid problems, excess alcohol use, sleep apnea, and certain lung diseases can also cause AF.

How is atrial fibrillation treated?

Some people with atrial fibrillation will return to normal rhythm without treatment. They will "convert" on their own back to normal rhythm. Treatment decisions depend in part on whether symptoms are bothersome and how long your heart has been in AF. For most people, treatment of AF involves attempts to restore (reset) the heart back to its normal rhythm (rhythm control) or to control the heart rate (rate control). Sometimes surgery or a procedure called catheter ablation is used. In addition, a person with AF is given medications to prevent blood clots to reduce the risk of stroke.  

Rhythm control. Rhythm control is an attempt to reset the heart back to its normal rhythm. It can be done with medications or electrical shock.

  • Anti-arrhythmic medications, such as sodium channel blockers or potassium channel blockers, slow the heart's ability to send electrical signals.

  • Electrical cardioversion involves sending an electrical shock through paddles placed on the chest. Usually doctors will want you to take blood thinners for a period of time before electrical cardioversion to reduce the risk of a stroke from a dislodged blood clot.

Rate control. Medications to help control the heart rate include

  • Beta blockers, such as atenolol or metoprolol. These drugs slow the heart rate.

  • Calcium channel blockers, such as diltiazem or verapamil. These drugs slow the heart rate.

  • Digoxin. This drug slows the electrical currents between the upper and lower chambers.

Catheter ablation. In this procedure, a catheter is guided through a blood vessel to the heart. Here energy is sent through the catheter to destroy small areas of heart tissue responsible for the arrhythmia. It may be an option when medications are not working.

Maze procedure. This is a surgical procedure in which areas of the heart are cut to create a "maze" of scar tissue that prevents the erratic electrical signals from passing through the heart.  

Treatment to prevent blood clots. People with AF will be prescribed blood thinners to reduce the risk for stroke. This may include aspirin, clopidogrel, warfarin, dabigatran, or rivaroxaban. Your doctor will have a detailed discussion with you about which blood-thinning medications are most appropriate for you.

Cardiothoracic Surgeons

David A. Bull, M.D.

David Bull, MD, is a member of the Thoracic Oncology Program, a joint effort between Huntsman Cancer Institute and the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics. The program was developed to offer consultation, diagnosis, and treatment for all chest cancers. Bull is a professor in the Department of Surgery, Divis... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Revascularization, Esophageal Surgery, Heart Transplant, Lung Cancer, Lung Transplant, Valvular Heart Disease

Locations:

South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500
University Hospital (801) 581-5311

Phillip T. Burch, M.D.

Dr. Burch performs repairs for a wide variety of congenital cardaic anomalies. In additon to clinical responsibilities, Dr. Burch has research interests in single ventricle physiology as well as in derangements in normal neonatal metabolism caused by cardiac surgery.... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5577

Aaron W. Eckhauser, M.D., M.S.C.I

I joined the University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery in 2012. I am board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Thoracic Surgery. My clinical interests are focused on caring for all patients, from neonates to adults, with congenital heart defects. I have ... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart Transplant, Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Ganesh S. Kumpati, M.D.

Dr Kumpati performs adult cardiac surgery, thoracic surgery, and vascular surgery. Dr Kumpati has significant experience in both surgical and endovascular management of aortic disease, including endovascular aneurysm repair. Prior to joining the University of Utah in August 2011, Dr Kumpati was in private prac... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

University Hospital (801) 581-5311
Veterans Administration Medical Center (801) 582-1565

Stephen McKellar, M.D., M.Sc.

Dr. McKellar is a native of Salt Lake City and received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Utah and his Doctor of Medicine from the George Washington University School of Medicine. He completed his General Surgical and Cardiothoracic Surgical training at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota in a com... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Revascularization, Heart Failure, Heart Transplant, Lung Transplant, Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery, Valvular Heart Disease

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Amit N. Patel, M.D.

Amit Patel, MD, MS, is an associate professor in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering at the University of Utah. His clinical interests include heart surgery for coronary disease, valve repair and... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart Failure, Heart Stem Cell Therapy, Heart Transplant, Lung Transplant, Valvular Heart Disease

Locations:

University Hospital (801) 587-7946

Craig H. Selzman, M.D.

Dr. Craig Selzman is an Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Utah who specializes in the care of patients requiring heart surgery. He earned his undergraduate degree at Amherst College and medical degree at Baylor College of Medicine. He received his Gener... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Revascularization, Heart Failure, Heart Stem Cell Therapy, Heart Transplant, Lung Transplant, Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery, Surgical Ventricular Restoration, Valvular Heart Disease

Locations:

University Hospital (801) 587-9348

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Nurse Practitioner

Locations:

Eccles Primary Children’s Outpatient Services Building (801) 662-1000
University Hospital (801) 581-0434

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Terri M. Hancock, DNP, ACNP-BC

Terri Hancock, DNP, ACNP-BC, is a board certified Acute Care Nurse Practitioner with the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Utah. As a Cardiothoracic Surgery Nurse Practitioner, Terri is interested in evaluating and improving the overall quality of care and clinical efficiency of cardiac and... Read More

Specialties:

Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

University Hospital (801) 581-5311

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Locations:

University Hospital (801) 231-2200

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Nathan C. Sontum, PA-C, M.H.S.

PA-C for department of CT surgery 2010-Present... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Scott A. Tatum, PA-C

Scott came to the University over 6 years ago from private practice. As a trainer and consultant for Endoscopic Vein harvesting, he has effectively introduced and incorporated new technology and procedures into the University healthcare system. As the senior physician assistant in the division of cardiothoraci... Read More

Specialties:

Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Locations:

University Hospital (801) 581-2121

Locations

University Campus
University Hospital
50 N Medical Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
Map
(801) 581-2121
Primary Children's Hospital
100 N Mario Capecchi Dr
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
(801) 662-1000
Veterans Administration Medical Center
500 Foothill Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84148
(801) 582-1565