Two children enjoying spring

When Kids Aren't Paying Attention,
Is It Selective Hearing or Loss of Hearing?

Our pediatric ENT (otolaryngology) specialists are trained in managing and treating children with diseases and disorders of the ear, nose, throat (ENT). The areas of the ear, nose, and throat include the sinuses, the larynx (voice box), the oral cavity, the upper pharynx (mouth & throat), and other structures of the neck and face.

Our ENT specialists understand that working with children can be a challenge. We are committed to providing your child with the best care possible for each individual circumstance. We invite you to contact us for an evaluation of your child’s symptoms or condition.

Contact Us

Phone: (801) 662-1740

Conditions

Specific conditions we treat include these:

Anatomy and Physiology of the Nose and Throat

What is the nose?

The nose is the organ of smell located in the middle of the face. The internal part of the nose lies above the roof of the mouth. The nose consists of:

  • External meatus. Triangular-shaped projection in the center of the face.

  • External nostrils. Two chambers divided by the septum.

  • Septum. Made up primarily of cartilage and bone and covered by mucous membranes. The cartilage also gives shape and support to the outer part of the nose.

  • Nasal passages. Passages that are lined with mucous membranes and tiny hairs (cilia) that help to filter the air.

  • Sinuses. Four pairs of air-filled cavities, also lined with mucous membranes.

What are sinuses?

The sinuses are cavities, or air-filled pockets, near the nasal passage. As in the nasal passage, the sinuses are lined with mucous membranes. There are four different types of sinuses:

  • Ethmoid sinus. This sinus is located inside the face, around the area of the bridge of the nose. It is present at birth, and continues to grow.

  • Maxillary sinus. This sinus is located inside the face, around the area of the cheeks. It is also present at birth, and continues to grow.

  • Frontal sinus. This sinus is located inside the face, in the area of the forehead. It does not develop until around 7 years of age.

  • Sphenoid sinus. This sinus is located deep in the face, behind the nose. It does not typically develop until adolescence.

What is the throat?

The throat is a ring-like muscular tube that acts as the passageway for air, food, and liquid. The throat also helps in forming speech. The throat consists of:

  • Larynx (also known as the voice box). The larynx is a cylindrical grouping of cartilage, muscles, and soft tissue that contains the vocal cords. The vocal cords are the upper opening into the windpipe (trachea), the passageway to the lungs.

  • Epiglottis. A flap of soft tissue located just above the vocal cords. The epiglottis folds down over the vocal cords to prevent food and irritants from entering the lungs.

  • Tonsils and adenoids. They are made up of lymph tissue and are located at the back and the sides of the mouth. They protect against infection, but generally have little purpose beyond childhood.

Anatomy and Physiology of the Ear

What is the ear?

The ear is the organ of hearing. The parts of the ear include:

  • External or outer ear, consisting of:

    • Pinna or auricle. This is the outside part of the ear.

    • External auditory canal or tube. This is the tube that connects the outer ear to the inside or middle ear.

  • Tympanic membrane (also called the eardrum). The tympanic membrane divides the external ear from the middle ear.

  • Middle ear(tympanic cavity), consisting of:

    • Ossicles. Three small bones that are connected and transmit the sound waves to the inner ear. The bones are called:

      • Malleus

      • Incus

      • Stapes

    • Eustachian tube. A canal that links the middle ear with the throat area. The eustachian tube helps to equalize the pressure between the outer ear and the middle ear. Having the same pressure allows for the proper transfer of sound waves. The eustachian tube is lined with mucous, just like the inside of the nose and throat.

  • Inner ear, consisting of:

    • Cochlea (contains the nerves for hearing)

    • Vestibule (contains receptors for balance)

    • Semicircular canals (contain receptors for balance)

How do we hear?

Hearing starts with the outer ear. When a sound is made outside the outer ear, the sound waves, or vibrations, travel down the external auditory canal and strike the eardrum (tympanic membrane). The eardrum vibrates. The vibrations are then passed to three tiny bones in the middle ear called the ossicles. The ossicles amplify the sound and send the sound waves to the inner ear and into the fluid-filled hearing organ (cochlea).

Once the sound waves reach the inner ear, they are converted into electrical impulses, which the auditory nerve sends to the brain. The brain then translates these electrical impulses as sound.

Specialties:

Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Pediatric Otolaryngology

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-1740
South Jordan Health Center (801) 587-8368

Johannes F. Grimmer, M.D.

Dr. Grimmer has an interest in pediatric head and neck surgery including cancer, airway reconstruction, congenital neck masses, thyroid disease, and vascular birthmarks. He is the Director of the Vascular Anomalies Center at Primary Children's Medical Center and coordinates the multidisciplinary care that such ... Read More

Specialties:

Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Pediatric Otolaryngology, Vascular Malformations

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 662-1740
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-1740
University Hospital (801) 662-1740

Jeremy Meier, M.D.

Dr. Meier grew up in Salt Lake City. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from Brigham Young University, and graduated summa cum laude from St. Louis University School of Medicine. He completed his residency in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California Davis Med... Read More

Specialties:

Cleft palate - lip surgery, Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Pediatric Otolaryngology

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 662-1740
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-1740
University Hospital (801) 662-1740

Harlan R. Muntz, M.D., FACS

Dr. Harlan Muntz is a professor at the University of Utah where he teaches residents in pediatrics and ENT as well as doing research and patient care. His research has mostly focused on children’s sinus problems and cleft palate speech problems, but has influenced many other areas of pediatric ENT. He is current... Read More

Specialties:

Cleft palate - lip surgery, Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Pediatric Otolaryngology

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 662-1740
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-1740
University Hospital (801) 662-1740

Albert H. Park, M.D.

Dr. Albert Park graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a medical degree in 1990. He subsequently completed his residency in otolaryngology at Loyola University Medical Center in Chicago and his fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. He joined... Read More

Specialties:

Cytomegalovirus, Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Pediatric Hearing Loss, Pediatric Otolaryngology

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 662-1740
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-1740
University Hospital (801) 662-1740

Marshall E. Smith, M.D., FACS

Dr. Marshall Smith is a professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. He is a board certified otolaryngologist and the medical director of the Voice Disorders Center. He completed his residency in Otolaryngology at UCLA and a fellowship in Pediatric Otolaryngolgoy in Cincinnati. He is an NIH funded investig... Read More

Specialties:

Airway Disorders, Laryngeal Laser Surgery, Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Pediatric Otolaryngology, Vasculitis, Voice Disorders

Locations:

LDS Hospital (801) 408-4972
PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 662-1740
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-1740
Surgical Specialty Center (801) 587-8368
University Hospital (801) 587-8368
University Hospital
Clinic 9
50 N Medical Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
Map
Appointments
(801) 662-1740
South Jordan Health Center 5126 W. Daybreak Parkway
South Jordan, UT 84095
Map
(801) 213-4500
Primary Children's Hospital 100 N. Mario Capecchi Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
Map
(801) 662-1740
Primary Children's Outpatient Services at Riverton 3773 W. 12600 S.
Riverton, UT 84065
Map
(801) 662-1740