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John D. Kriesel, M.D., B.S., M.D.

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Specialties

Languages

  • English

Clinical Details

Phone Number Clinical Office Address
(801) 585-2031
University Hospital
Infectious Diseases, Clinic 1A
50 N Medical Dr
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
Map

Bio

Dr. John Kriesel graduated from Lake Forest High School in 1980 and then cum laude from the University of Illinois in 1984. He went on to graduate from Washington University Medical School in 1988. He came to Utah that year and completed a residency in Internal Medicine in 1991, and then a fellowship in Infectious Diseases in 1994. Dr. Kriesel joined the faculty at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1996 with a primary appointment in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. He was promoted to Research Associate Professor in 2007. He is currently board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases.

Dr. Kriesel's primary interests here are in translational and clinical reseach. His current research projects involve the genetics of human cold sores, possible viral triggers of multiple sclerosis, and strategies for the treatment of herpes simplex virus infections including vaccination and novel pharmaceuticals. He has authored 35 original scientific papers and book chapters, has 2 U.S. patents, 3 active research awards, and 18 completed research awards.

Dr. Kriesel's clinical responsibilities include infectious disease consultations at the VA and University Hospitals, internal medicine attending at the Salt Lake VA Hospital, HIV clinic at the University Hospital and the Utah State Prison, and attending at the Salt Lake City STD Clinic. He participates in the education of medical students, internal medicine residents, and infectious disease fellows.

Board Certification and Academic Information

Academic Departments Internal Medicine - Research Associate Professor
Dermatology - Adjunct Associate Professor
Academic Divisions Infectious Diseases
Board Certification American Board of Internal Medicine (Sub: Infec Disease)
American Board of Internal Medicine (Internal Medicine)
National Board of Medical Examiners

Academic Profile

Board Certification and Academic Information

Academic Departments Internal Medicine - Research Associate Professor
Dermatology - Adjunct Associate Professor
Academic Divisions Infectious Diseases
Board Certification American Board of Internal Medicine (Sub: Infec Disease)
American Board of Internal Medicine (Internal Medicine)
National Board of Medical Examiners

Academic Office Locations

Academic Office Phone Number Academic Office Address
(801) 581-8812 School of Medicine
Infectious Diseases
30 N 1900 E
Salt Lake City, UT 84132

Academic Bio

Dr. John Kriesel graduated from Lake Forest High School in 1980 and then cum laude from the University of Illinois in 1984. He went on to graduate from Washington University Medical School in 1988. He came to Utah that year and completed a residency in Internal Medicine in 1991, and then a fellowship in Infectious Diseases in 1994. Dr. Kriesel joined the faculty at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1996 with a primary appointment in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. He was promoted to Research Associate Professor in 2007. He is currently board certified in Infectious Diseases.

Dr. Kriesel's primary interests here are in translational and clinical reseach. His esearch projects involve the genetics of human cold sores, possible microbial triggers of multiple sclerosis, and strategies for the treatment of herpes simplex virus infections including vaccination and novel pharmaceuticals. He has authored 44 original scientific papers and book chapters, has 2 U.S. patents, several active research awards, and many completed research awards.

Dr. Kriesel's clinical responsibilities include infectious disease consultations at the VA and University Hospitals, internal medicine attending at the Salt Lake VA Hospital, HIV clinic at the University Hospital and the Utah State Prison, and clinical attending at the Salt Lake City STD Clinic. He participates in the education of nurses, dentists, graduate students, medical students, internal medicine residents, and infectious disease fellows.

Research Statement

Viral Trigger of MS:

Objectives: This is an exploratory (R21) application that uses advanced sequencing technology for the discovery of viruses in the brains of patients who died with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS).

Research Design: This is a retrospective study that utilizes frozen brain tissue from subjects with PPMS, other neurologic disease (OND), and normal controls. Deep sequencing of these specimens will be performed in the sequencing core laboratory at the Huntsman Cancer Institute on the University of Utah campus. Advanced informatics (metagenomics) will be used to compare millions of sequences from each group. The University of Utah Health Sciences IRB (UU-IRB #00028658) has reviewed the project and determined that the project uses only tissues from deceased, not living, subjects and is, therefore, exempt from review and oversight under NIH guidelines.

Methodology: The first specific aim will evaluate the presence, quantity, and assembly of virus-like sequences in brain specimens from primary progressive MS patients compared with control brain specimens. It is proposed that 15 PPMS frozen brain specimens will be extracted, evaluated, and sequenced using the techniques described. These sequences will be compared with the sets of control brain specimens, 15 each, from pathologically proven normal and OND controls. Differences in the presence and quantity of plausibly viral sequences between the MS and the two sets of control specimens will be examined using methods described below. The second aim of the project is to interrogate additional MS samples for the presence of candidate viruses using PCR. Additional samples will be interrogated for presence of the existing candidate virus, GBV-C, and any other candidate viruses that emerge from the proposed deep sequencing. This will be accomplished using the sequencing data to design primers and amplify any additional candidates that may emerge from the sequencing efforts in Aim 1. These PCR techniques will be applied to the 45 PPMS and control specimens sequenced in Aim 1. Additional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), frozen brain specimens, and fixed paraffinized brain specimens from deceased, deidentified subjects will be collected for analysis.

Findings: The project is set to begin in the fall of 2011 so there are no new findings to report.

Clinical Relationships: This is a high risk, potentially high reward research project that is intended to identify one or more pathogens associated with PPMS, a devastating disease with no known cause and few effective options for treatment. If successful, this work could lead to treatment and/or prevention of PPMS in veterans and active duty military personnel.

Education

Education History

Type School Degree
Fellowship University of Utah School of Medicine
Infectious Disease
Fellow
Residency University of Utah School of Medicine
Internal Medicine
Resident
Internship University of Utah School of Medicine
Intern
Professional Medical Washington University
Medicine
M.D.
Undergraduate University of Illinois
Biology
B.S.

Publications

Selected Provider Publications

Journal Article

  1. Jiang H, Schwertz H, Schmid DI, Jones BB, Kriesel J, Martinez ML, Weyrich AS, Zimmerman GA, Kraiss LW (2012). Different mechanisms preserve translation of programmed cell death 8 and JunB in virus-infected endothelial cells. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol, 32(4), 997-1004.
  2. Kriesel JD, Hobbs MR, Jones BB, Milash B, Nagra RM, Fischer KF (2012). Deep sequencing for the detection of virus-like sequences in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis: detection of GBV-C in human brain. PLoS One, 7(3), e31886.
  3. Bigham AW, Buckingham KJ, Husain S, Emond MJ, Bofferding KM, Gildersleeve H, Rutherford A, Astakhova NM, Perelygin AA, Busch MP, Murray KO, Sejvar JJ, Green S, Kriesel J, Brinton MA, Bamshad M (2011). Host genetic risk factors for West Nile virus infection and disease progression. PLoS One, 6(9), e24745.
  4. Kriesel JD, Jones BB, Matsunami N, Patel MK, St Pierre CA, Kurt-Jones EA, Finberg RW, Leppert M, Hobbs MR (2011). C21orf91 genotypes correlate with herpes simplex labialis (cold sore) frequency: description of a cold sore susceptibility gene. J Infect Dis, 204(11), 1654-62.
  5. Hobbs MR, Jones BB, Otterud BE, Leppert M, Kriesel JD (2008). Identification of a herpes simplex labialis susceptibility region on human chromosome 21. J Infect Dis, 197(3), 340-6.
  6. Hobbs MR, Jones BB, Otterud BE, Leppert MF, Kriesel JD (2007). Identification of a Herpes Simplex Labialis Susceptibility Region on Human Chromosome 21. Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Case Report

  1. Kriesel JD, Sutton DA, Schulman S, Fothergill AW, Rinaldi MG (2008). Persistent pulmonary infection with an azole-resistant Coccidioides species. Med Mycol, 46(6), 607-10.

Abstract

  1. Kriesel JD, Jones BB, Herpin G, Grissom C (2007). Development of an Antigene Therapy for the Treatment of Herpes Keratitis [Abstract]. Annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO).
  2. Jiang H, Jones BB, Kriesel J, Schmid DI, Weyrich AS, Zimmerman GA, Kraiss LW (2007). A New Pathway To Gene Expression in Human Endothelial Cells: Filamin B translation is preserved by internal ribosome entry in virally- infected Endothelial Cells [Abstract]. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Annual Conference.
  3. Kriesel JD, Jones BB, Herpin G, Grissom C (2006). Development of an Antigene Therapy for the Treatment of Herpes Keratitis [Abstract]. Annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO).

Clinical Trials

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