Patient Rating:

4.3 out of 5

28 Patient Ratings
5 Patient Comments

Kevin Duff, Ph.D.

Clinical Details

Schedule An Appointment Clinical Office Address
(801) 585-7575 Imaging and Neurosciences Center
Cognitive Disorders Clinic
729 Arapeen Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
Map

Bio

Dr. Kevin Duff is a board certified Clinical Neuropsychologist. He conducts comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations in the Cognitive Disorders Clinic, a sub-specialty clinic of the University of Utah Center for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research (CACIR). These evaluations are key to definitively diagnosing memory disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Dr. Duff’s clinical interests focus on a wide range of neurodegenerative disorders, from Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s disease to Huntington’s disease.

Dr. Duff also conducts extensive research in clinical neuropsychology, aging and dementia. His current research, which has been funded by the NIH, examines the role of practice effects in predicting dementia.

Board Certification and Academic Information

Academic Departments Neurology - Associate Professor
Academic Divisions Cognitive Neurology
Board Certification American Board of Professional Psychology (Sub: Clinical Neuropsychology)

Patient Ratings

The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to care provider related questions on our nationally-recognized Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey.

Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the best score.

Likelihood of recommending care provider
4.2
My confidence in care provider
4.3
Time care provider spent with me
4.3
Care provider spoke using clear language
4.2
Care provider's effort to include me in decisions
4.4
Care provider's concern for questions & worries
4.5
Care provider's explanation of condition/problem
4.1
Wait time at clinic
4.5
Care provider's friendliness and courtesy
4.6

Patient Comments

Patient comments are gathered from our Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey and displayed in their entirety. Patients are de-identified for confidentiality and patient privacy.

May 09, 2013

Dr. Duff was very easy to talk to.

March 10, 2013

The experience was good. I do not know the results and would like to know that

January 14, 2013

Wonderful staff!

May 10, 2012

All of the physicians and staff are quite wonderful in terms of communication and care

January 17, 2012

same comment as before, completely satisfied, happy with all the care I got there.

Academic Profile

Research Interests

  • Psychiatric and cognitive functioning in Huntington's disease
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Dementia
  • Cognitive decline in normal aging
  • Practice effects as an indicator of cognitive plasticity

Board Certification and Academic Information

Academic Departments Neurology - Associate Professor
Academic Divisions Cognitive Neurology
Board Certification American Board of Professional Psychology (Sub: Clinical Neuropsychology)

Academic Office Locations

Academic Office Phone Number Academic Office Address
(801) 585-9983 650 Komas
Salt Lake City, UT 84108

Academic Bio

Kevin Duff, Ph.D., ABPP, is a board certified Clinical Neuropsychologist who joined the University of Utah faculty in 2009 as Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neuropsychologist at the University of Utah Center for Alzheimer's Care, Imaging and Research (CACIR). Dr. Duff also holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Psychology and is a member of the university’s Center on Aging.

Dr. Duff obtained his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York in Albany. He completed his neuropsychology internship at the Southern Arizona Healthcare System in Tucson, AZ, and his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. He joined the Psychiatry Department at the University of Iowa in 2003, where he accrued extensive teaching experience and had clinical and research responsibilities working with patients with dementia, Huntington's disease, and a variety of other neuropsychiatric conditions.

Dr. Duff conducts research in clinical neuropsychology, aging and dementia. His primary areas of interest include longitudinal cognitive assessment, practice effects as an indicator of cognitive plasticity, and cognitive decline in normal aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and dementia. He recently completed an NIH-funded study that sought to predict dementia using practice effects, and he has studied their implication in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Dr. Duff’s extensive work with Huntington’s disease has focused on psychiatric and cognitive functioning, particularly psychiatric and cognitive changes that occur in individuals before they manifest the disease. Dr. Duff’s research has been widely published in scientific journals and he has lectured nationally and internationally on his areas of expertise.

Dr. Duff is a member of the American Psychological Association, International Neuropsychological Society, National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN), and the Huntington’s Study Group. He is an Associate Editor for Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. In 2008, Dr. Duff received the Early Career Award from NAN for his outstanding contributions to the field of neuropsychology. In 2012, he was elected as Treasurer for Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association.

Education

Education History

Type School Degree
Fellowship University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Neuropsychology
Fellow
Internship Southern Arizona VA Health Care System
Neuropsychology
Intern
Doctoral Training University at Albany
Clinical Psychology
Ph.D.
Graduate Training University of Northern Colorado
Psychology
M.A.
Undergraduate University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth
Psychology
B.A.

Publications

Selected Provider Publications

Journal Article

  1. Functional impairment in progressive supranuclear palsy.Duff K, Gerstenecker A, Litvan I (2013). Functional impairment in progressive supranuclear palsy. Neurology, 80(4), 380-384.
  2. Amyloid Deposition and Cognition in Older Adults: The Effects of Premorbid Intellect.Duff K, Foster NL, Dennett K, Hammers DB, Zollinger LV, Christian PE, Butterfield RI, Beardmore BE, Wang AY, Morton KA, Hoffman JM (2013). Amyloid Deposition and Cognition in Older Adults: The Effects of Premorbid Intellect. Arch Clin Neuropsychol.
  3. Evidence-Based Indicators of Neuropsychological Change in the Individual Patient: Relevant Concepts and Methods.Duff K (2012). Evidence-Based Indicators of Neuropsychological Change in the Individual Patient: Relevant Concepts and Methods. Arch Clin Neuropsychol.
  4. Predicting current memory with the modified telephone interview for cognitive status.Duff K, Dennett K, Tometich D (2012). Predicting current memory with the modified telephone interview for cognitive status. Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen, 27(3), 175-9.
  5. Within-session practice effects in patients referred for suspected dementia.Duff K, Chelune G, Dennett K (2012). Within-session practice effects in patients referred for suspected dementia. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord, 33(4), 245-9.
  6. Practice effects: a unique cognitive variable.Duff K, Callister C, Dennett K, Tometich D (2012). Practice effects: a unique cognitive variable. Clin Neuropsychol, 26(7), 1117-27.
  7. Executive Dysfunction Is the Primary Cognitive Impairment in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.Gerstenecker A, Mast B, Duff K, Ferman TJ, Litvan I (2012). Executive Dysfunction Is the Primary Cognitive Impairment in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Arch Clin Neuropsychol.
  8. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial to improve cognitive functioning in older adults: the Iowa Healthy and Active Minds Study.Wolinsky FD, Vander Weg MW, Howren MB, Jones MP, Martin R, Luger TM, Duff K, Goerdt C, Wolfe S, Dotson MM (2011). Protocol for a randomised controlled trial to improve cognitive functioning in older adults: the Iowa Healthy and Active Minds Study. BMJ Open, 1(2), e000218.
  9. Practice effects predict cognitive outcome in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.Duff K, Lyketsos CG, Beglinger LJ, Chelune G, Moser DJ, Arndt S, Schultz SK, Paulsen JS, Petersen RC, McCaffrey RJ (2011). Practice effects predict cognitive outcome in amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry, 19(11), 932-9.
  10. Interim analyses from a randomised controlled trial to improve visual processing speed in older adults: the Iowa Healthy and Active Minds Study.Wolinsky FD, Vander Weg MW, Howren MB, Jones MP, Martin R, Luger TM, Duff K, Dotson MM (2011). Interim analyses from a randomised controlled trial to improve visual processing speed in older adults: the Iowa Healthy and Active Minds Study. BMJ Open, 1(2), e000225.
  11. Predicting cognitive change in older adults: the relative contribution of practice effects.Duff K, Beglinger LJ, Moser DJ, Paulsen JS, Schultz SK, Arndt S (2010). Predicting cognitive change in older adults: the relative contribution of practice effects. Arch Clin Neuropsychol, 25(2), 81-8.
  12. Diagnostic accuracy of the RBANS in mild cognitive impairment: limitations on assessing milder impairments.Duff K, Hobson VL, Beglinger LJ, OBryant SE (2010). Diagnostic accuracy of the RBANS in mild cognitive impairment: limitations on assessing milder impairments. Arch Clin Neuropsychol, 25(5), 429-41.
  13. Short-term practice effects in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: implications for diagnosis and treatment.Duff K, Beglinger LJ, Van Der Heiden S, Moser DJ, Arndt S, Schultz SK, Paulsen JS (2008). Short-term practice effects in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: implications for diagnosis and treatment. Int Psychogeriatr, 20(5), 986-99.
  14. Practice effects in the prediction of long-term cognitive outcome in three patient samples: a novel prognostic index.Duff K, Beglinger LJ, Schultz SK, Moser DJ, McCaffrey RJ, Haase RF, Westervelt HJ, Langbehn DR, Paulsen JS (2007). Practice effects in the prediction of long-term cognitive outcome in three patient samples: a novel prognostic index. Arch Clin Neuropsychol, 22(1), 15-24.
  15. Test-retest stability and practice effects of the RBANS in a community dwelling elderly sample.Duff K, Beglinger LJ, Schoenberg MR, Patton DE, Mold J, Scott JG, Adams RL (2005). Test-retest stability and practice effects of the RBANS in a community dwelling elderly sample. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol, 27(5), 565-75.
  16. Predicting change with the RBANS in a community dwelling elderly sample.Duff K, Schoenberg MR, Patton D, Mold J, Scott JG, Adams RL (2004). Predicting change with the RBANS in a community dwelling elderly sample. J Int Neuropsychol Soc, 10(6), 828-34.
  17. Age- and education-corrected independent normative data for the RBANS in a community dwelling elderly sample.Duff K, Patton D, Schoenberg MR, Mold J, Scott JG, Adams RL (2003). Age- and education-corrected independent normative data for the RBANS in a community dwelling elderly sample. Clin Neuropsychol, 17(3), 351-66.

Letter

  1. Practice effects and outcome of cognitive training: preliminary evidence from a memory training course.Duff K, Beglinger LJ, Moser DJ, Schultz SK, Paulsen JS (2010). Practice effects and outcome of cognitive training: preliminary evidence from a memory training course [Letter to the editor]. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry, 18(1), 91.

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