Health Information

  • Chilling Tales From the Freezer

    Foods shouldn't stay frozen indefinitely. In fact, some foods -- like bacon -- shouldn't be kept in the freezer for much more than a month.

  • 5 Ways to Avoid Colds and the Flu

    You don't want to spend this winter battling a runny nose, a nagging cough or a fever. Here's what to do.

  • Your Lips Need Protection

    Your skin contains oil that protects it from drying out and from extreme temperatures, but your lips do not.

  • How to Prevent, Treat Choking on Toys

    Although people know toys can be dangerous, injuries can still occur.

  • Be in the Know When on the Go in Winter

    If you live in an area where winter brings snow, slush and ice, the best advice about driving in these conditions is not to. But if you must venture out, be prepared.

  • Trampoline Troubles

    Trampolines are popular. Thousands of children are rocketing skyward, and trampoline injuries are also on the rise.

  • Preventing Broken Bones

    Bones are tough and resilient, but if you push them hard enough--if you fall on a hard surface, for instance--they can crack or break.

  • Raise the Alarm Against Carbon Monoxide

    Carbon monoxide (CO), an odorless and colorless gas, is created from the incomplete burning of fuels like gas, oil and wood.

  • Hold the Line on Phone Fraud

    Many frauds focus on older people on the theory that they're generally more trusting and polite to strangers.

  • Be Careful With Kitchen Knives

    With a few cutting-edge tips from experts who use knives for a living -- top chefs -- you can avoid the biggest danger of kitchen work.

  • Do I Really Need a Fire Extinguisher?
  • Hand Tool Safety

    Although hand tools do not pose the same lethal threat as some power tools, they are still a factor in a high number of accidents each year.

  • Eating Raw Clams: Is It Risky?

    The FDA notes that shellfish, especially mollusks, are more likely to cause foodborne illness than fish because shellfish pump water through their bodies.

  • Protect Your Eyes When Jump-Starting a Car

    Auto battery accidents cause many Americans to lose their sight or suffer serious eye injuries.

  • Chilling Meat: It's All About Safety

    From the farm to the store, meat and poultry products must be chilled -- and kept chilled, packaged and handled properly so it will be safe for consumers to buy. Several government agencies have the responsibility to assure the food's safety. In the home, food caretakers must do their part to store, handle and cook meat and poultry right so it's safe to eat.

  • A Safety Checklist for Parents

    You can help keep your children safe by following these precautions.

  • Is It Too Hot To Trot?

    If you're not careful, you could wind up with a case of heat exhaustion just as easily as the couch potato next door, no matter how fit you might be.

  • Myths and Tips About Dressing for Winter

    Here are some misconceptions about the cold, and some suggestions for staying toasty this winter.

  • Hand Washing Prevents Hepatitis A Infection

    Aside from immunization, hand washing before eating or preparing food, after using the bathroom or changing a baby's diaper remains one of the best preventions against getting or spreading hepatitis A virus.

  • House Fires: Don't Underestimate Them
  • How Older Adults Can Prevent Hypothermia

    Age lowers your ability to endure long periods of cold. You're also at risk if your response to cold is impaired by certain illnesses or medications.

  • Eye Protection Keeps Kids in the Game

    The sports that cause the most injuries are basketball, baseball, pool sports and racket sports. But any sport that involves a projectile is considered hazardous to the eyes.

  • Protect Your Kids From Internet Crime

    Youngsters spend time online messaging, chatting, searching and surfing. Although most of these Internet experiences are likely positive, parents need to be aware of the dangers to better protect their children.

  • Follow the Road to Safety

    Exercising outdoors can be fun and enjoyable, but you should keep personal safety in mind before you head out the door.

  • Leave Mushroom Hunting to the Experts
  • Air Bags and Kids

    A car with an air bag is considered safer than a car without one. But for children under 12 years old, air bags can be dangerous.

  • A Primer for Preschooler Safety

    Your little ones can learn a lot about safety if you take some time to teach them. Here's an ABC that you and your children can recite together.

  • Under the Influence...of Drowsiness

    Each year, at least 100,000 vehicular crashes and 1,550 deaths are caused by drivers who are impaired by sleepiness.

  • Is Pink Turkey Meat Safe?

    The color pink in cooked turkey meat raises a "red flag" to many diners and cooks. Conditioned to be wary of pink in fresh pork, they question the safety of cooked poultry and other meats that have a rosy blush.

  • Avoid Injury Around Barbecue Grills

    Because barbecue grills are operated in a casual, relaxed atmosphere, they tend to be taken for granted. And that can lead to serious injury.

  • Ceramics: Pretty, and Maybe Poisonous

    Certain ceramics may cause lead poisoning, and some may leach cadmium into food and drink.

  • Play It Safe With Kitchen Fires

    Most fires in the home start in the kitchen, and kitchen fires can quickly turn serious.

  • Play It Cool in the Hot Tub

    What's more relaxing that a good soak in a hot tub? Hot water sure makes you feel great, but hot tubs and whirlpools can sometimes be dangerous -- and even deadly.

  • Time to Fertilize? Wait a Minute!
  • Keeping Your Kitchen Under Control

    The kitchen is the "dirtiest" room in the house, according to a recent study, because people are less likely to use strong cleaners and disinfectants in that room.

  • Safe Food-Handling Tips

    You can avoid foodborne illness by following these ideas for safe food handling and cooking.

  • Contact Lens Safety Tips

    If you wear contact lenses, it's important to follow your eye care provider's instructions on wearing and disinfecting them.

  • Sports Eye Safety Is No Game

    Sports is the leading cause of school-age children's eye injuries, but most of those injuries are preventable.

  • Street Hockey: Good Surface, Gear Are Critical

    Street hockey is popular because it's cheaper than regular hockey and can be played anywhere there is a hard surface.

  • Safety Precautions for Kids in Cars

    Motor-vehicle crashes are the leading cause of childhood death in the United States. But when properly installed and used, child safety seats reduce the risk of death by 70 percent for infants and 55 percent for toddlers.

  • Preventing Car Crime

    Vehicle thefts, carjackings and thefts of vehicle contents are common crimes. Here are suggestions that can help you prevent them.

  • Cooking Temperatures and Safe Food Handling
  • How Does Your Garden Grow?
  • Car Safety

    Detailed information on car safety

  • Health Precautions When You Travel by Air
  • Kids Need Safety Gear for In-line Skating

    Having your child wear the appropriate safety gear and use common sense when skating can help reduce the risk for injury.

  • Basketball: Make Safety a Point

    Experts say players can avoid injury by strengthening muscles through a supervised weight-training program before the season. That helps prevent injuries to knees and ankles, the most common court injuries.

  • Treat It Right: Food Safety

    Did you know that home cooking causes more food-borne illness than restaurant food?

  • Help Your Back Work for You

    Your back is important to almost every move you make, but you probably won't realize that until you hurt it.

  • How to Map Out a Safe Vacation

    By thinking ahead and planning for your vacation before you go, the only surprises you'll encounter are the nice ones.

  • Protecting Your Child from Sports Injuries

    Most children depend on recreational and school sports for exercise and fun. But too many young athletes suffer needless injuries.

  • Preventing Household Poisonings

    Here are tips to help prevent poisoning in your home.

  • Safety Checklist: How Does Your Family Rate?

    Keeping your family safe and sound can be as easy as following simple safety rules consistently. Here's a checklist from the National Safety Council can help you maintain essential safety precautions.

  • Essential Guidelines for Fireworks Safety

    It's best to let the professionals handle the fireworks displays. If you plan to celebrate the holiday with your own fireworks, these precautions can help prevent injuries.

  • Child Safety for All Ages

    Some safety hazards apply to all children. But many problems are especially dangerous for children at a particular age or stage of development. Keep these precautions in mind as your children grow.

  • Handling Hazardous Materials at Home

    Many common household products contain chemicals that can cause injury or death if they are handled, stored or used improperly.

  • Doing Your Part to Help Prevent Drunken Driving

    Just about everybody loves a party. But if your party menu includes alcohol, be a smart host and insist that your guests to play it safe on the way home.

  • Protect Your Hearing on the Job

    If you think you don't need hearing protection at work because you're used to the steady roar of equipment or trucks, damage has already begun.

  • How to Keep Your Baby or Toddler Safe

    Here are tips on the basics of child safety.

  • Make Sure Bunk Beds Meet Safety Rules

    The bed should meet federal requirements to keep your kids safe. It's also important to set guidelines for your kids on how to use the bunk bed.

  • Hazardous Substances Demand Your Respect

    Depending where you work and the substances you handle, you may be at risk of accidental poisonings, chemical burns or suffocation. Knowing and following the right precautions can help keep you safe.

  • Bike-Helmet Safety Smarts

    Whether on an adult or a child, a helmet that has been approved by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and fits correctly will cushion the head in a fall and protect it from impact with other objects.

  • Buying Guidelines for Safe and Fun Toys

    Toy-related injuries send tens of thousands of children to the emergency room each year. Most injuries occur when parents give their children toys meant for older children.

  • Safe Handling of Food Gifts
  • Preventing Falls

    About 75 percent of all falls occur at home. Taking certain precautions and exercising to stay physically strong can prevent many of them.

  • Water-Safety 101: Basic Guidelines

    Every year, thousands of Americans are injured or killed in boating and swimming accidents.

  • Unwrap the Gift of Toy Safety

    Your challenge is to find toys that your children will enjoy and that you know are safe.

  • A Recipe for Food Safety

    Although most foodborne illness stems from raw animal foods -- such as eggs, meats and dairy products -- fruits and vegetables may carry germs, too.

  • Keep Clear of Golf's Hazards

    While many view golf as a leisure activity, more golfers are becoming fitness-minded. The sport demands superior flexibility, strength and cardiovascular fitness.

  • Have a Hazard-Free Halloween

    Halloween safety begins at home, with the child's costume. Every part of the costume -- masks, beards, wigs and clothing -- should be made of flame-resistant material.

  • Take Care of Your Hard Hat
  • Five Steps to a Safer Kitchen

    Your kitchen is a hub for family life -- but it's also rife with risks. While you can't foresee every hazard, you can make the room safer.

  • Make Friends with Your Meds

    What makes some people sticklers for following through with their medications, and others haphazard at best?

  • Beware of Over-the-Counter Contact Lenses

    Contacts that aren't properly prescribed and cared for can lead to allergic reactions, bacterial infections, corneal ulcers, and corneal scrapes. Some problems can end in blindness.

  • A Heads-Up for Football Safety

    Coaches should tell players not to tackle or block with their heads or run head-down with the ball.

  • 10 Ways to Keep Your Family Safe
  • Cycling Safely

    Many biking accidents could be prevented if riders protected themselves with the right equipment and maintained their bikes with safety in mind.

  • The Truth About Club Drugs

    Ecstasy, GHB, Rohypnol and Ketamine are some of the so-called club drugs used by teens and young adults at nightclubs and raves -- all-night dances.

  • How to Be a Happy Camper -- or Hiker

    Whether you're a first-time hiker out for an easy walk in the woods or an expert camping in the wilderness, think about safety before you head outdoors.

  • Using Herbal Supplements? Use Caution, Too

    Unlike prescription and over-the-counter drugs, supplements can make it to market without proving purity, composition, effectiveness, or even safety.

  • Steer Clear of Sports Supplements

    Youths see their sports heroes using what seem to be magic potions, and they want to do it, too.

  • Protect Your Child from Medical Errors

    A medical error can occur when something that was planned for medical care doesn't work, or when the wrong plan was used in the first place.

  • Preventing Falls One Step at a Time

    Although it's impossible to prevent all falls, you can help keep yourself safe by improving your balance and employing "fall-proofing" behaviors.

  • Avoiding Non-Impact Eye Injuries

    You may think wearing goggles is enough to protect your eyes, but many injuries can happen to your eyes that goggles won't prevent.

  • Cough Medicine Abuse by Teens

    A common ingredient in many cough and cold remedies has become a popular substance to abuse by teenagers searching for a cheap, easy high.

  • Medication Strategies During Pregnancy

    No one can say for sure that a medication is safe to use while you're pregnant. But, avoiding medicines may not be a good idea, either. It may be wiser to treat an illness than ignore it.

  • When and How to Stop Antidepressant Medication

    Deciding when and how to stop taking several popular antidepressants is something you should always discuss with your health care provider.

  • For Adults: Take Care with Antidepressants

    These drugs take time to be effective. It may take weeks to know if one is helping you.

  • Plastic Surgery Is Up Among Youths

    Plastic surgery is not for every youth. For some procedures, the child must reach milestones in age, growth and physical maturity.

  • Stay Awake Behind the Wheel

    When you're behind the wheel, you may believe that you can stop yourself from falling asleep, but you can't. You may not even know you've dozed off.

  • Primer: GHB, the Club Drug

    On the street, GHB is used for is ability to produce a feeling of euphoria and hallucinations.

  • Toss Your Baby Walker, Pediatricians Say

    Walkers can cause children to roll down stairs, causing head injuries and even death. This is the most common way children get hurt in walkers.

  • Female Teen Athletes: At Risk for Injury?

    Teen girls who are athletes face unique obstacles when it comes to their bodies and how well they perform.

  • Keep Kids Safe During Yard Work

    Power tools make yard work easier, from mowing the lawn to trimming the bushes. These tools, however, also pose a threat to children if precautions aren't taken.

  • Steroids, Sterols, Anabolic Steroids, and Corticosteroids: What's the Difference?

    Steroids are important compounds used in medicine, but people often misunderstand what they are.

  • Clinical Trials: Should You Participate?

    Being involved in a clinical trial has risks and benefits. Being informed and asking lots of questions can help you make a decision.

  • Tips for Staying Healthy and Safe at Work

    Most of us may not think much about our health and safety on the job, but we probably should.

  • What to Do If You Have to Evacuate Your Home

    Consider in advance what kinds of disasters might strike your area. Do you live in an earthquake zone? Is flooding a possibility? Then think about what you'll do in an emergency.

  • Food Freshness: What Those Dates Really Mean

    Here a rundown on the dates you find on food labels and what those dates mean, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  • Concussions: Caution Is a No-Brainer

    Although concussions range from mild to severe, they're all serious injuries that can harm the way the brain works.

  • Take Care With Nasal Sprays

    A medicated nasal decongestant spray may offer fast relief when your nose is congested and running. It can reduce swelling and clear mucus from your nasal passages quickly.

  • On the Barbecue, Charred Is Barred

    Researchers have found that cooking muscle meats -- beef, pork, poultry and fish -- at high temperatures may pose a risk for cancer.

  • For Seniors: You Can Beat the Heat

    After age 65, your body can't adjust to changes in air temperature -- especially heat -- as quickly as it did when you were younger. That puts you at risk for heat-related illnesses.

  • Stop Dating Abuse Before It Starts

    Although teen dating violence is worrisome, it's not inevitable. You and your teen can avoid potentially perilous situations and reduce the risk for problems.

  • Primer: Smokeless Tobacco

    Many people think using smokeless tobacco is safer than smoking. Just because there's no smoke, doesn't mean it's safe.

  • All About Child Passenger Safety

    Installing your child's car seat properly and using it every time your son or daughter rides in the car is one of the best ways to help keep him or her safe in case of an accident.

  • Recognizing a Partner's Emotional Abuse

    Physical violence is just one form of domestic abuse. If you have a partner who verbally humiliates you, demands all your attention, blames you for everything that goes wrong or threatens to harm you or your children, you're also being abused.

  • Cheerleading Safety

    A safe cheerleading program will include direct adult supervision, proper conditioning, skills training and warm-up exercises.

  • How to Avoid Sports Injuries

    Sports injury rates could be reduced by 25 percent if all athletes -- professionals and amateurs -- followed essential safety, conditioning, and preventive strategies.

  • What About Energy Drinks for Kids?

    As some schools ban colas from vending machines, ads are hyping a source of even more caffeine: energy drinks.

  • Sound Advice for MP3 Users

    Experts say today's small music players pose a big risk of hearing loss. One reason: The "earbuds" used with iPods and other MP3 players fit into the ears, not over them.

  • What Are the Health Effects of Air Pollution?

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) tracks five major air pollutants that cause significant health effects: ground-level ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide and microscopic particles called particulate matter.

  • Secondhand Smoke, Firsthand Problems

    Breathing even a little smoke can be harmful, because there is no risk-free level of secondhand smoke. The only way to protect yourself and the people you love is to provide a 100 percent smoke-free setting.

  • Take the Bite Out of Spring

    Mosquitoes can be more than a nuisance -- they can ruin your outdoor plans and threaten your health. So it's a good idea to protect yourself and your family as the weather heats up.

  • ADHD Drugs Safe, Experts Say

    Parents of kids with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) face a tough choice: whether to medicate their children or not.

  • Protect Yourself from Sexual Assault

    Rape can happen to anyone--children, grandmothers, students, working women, wives, mothers, and even males.

  • How to Safely Choose OTC Medications

    Over-the-counter (OTC) cough and pain relievers, laxatives, and headache remedies may treat different conditions, but they all have one thing in common: They're serious medicines that need to be taken with care.

  • Understanding Prescription Drug Abuse

    Although it's dangerous to take a prescription medication without a prescription, abusing such medications is the fastest growing type of drug abuse in the United States, outpacing marijuana abuse by a factor of two, according to some studies.

  • Taking Care with Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne bacterial infection that most often targets the skin, joints, brain, and heart, although any part of the body can be affected.

  • Is Your Medication Working for You?

    Prescription drugs can enhance your life, but when not used correctly, they may have the opposite effect.

  • Safe Summer Play

    May through August is the most dangerous time of year for children, according to Safe Kids Worldwide. In a recent report, Safe Kids found nearly half of all injury-related childhood deaths occur during the summer.

  • Use Your Medications Wisely

    Although most medications are safe when you take them the right way, some drugs can cause dizziness, loss of consciousness, bleeding, irregular heartbeats, and other side effects in some cases.

  • Little League Goes to Bat for Safety

    Pitchers ages 10 and under can throw no more than 75 pitches a game. After that, they can't pitch until they rest for four days.

  • 5 Key Mistakes Parents Make With Car Seats

    Safe Kids Worldwide estimates that three out of four children too small for seatbelts are incorrectly restrained in car seats or booster seats.

  • Essential Eye Protection

    Most eye injuries can be prevented by wearing the proper protective eyewear.

  • New Rules for OTC Cold Relief

    You'll face new hassles as you sneeze and sniffle. You'll have to ask your pharmacist or a store worker for medications that include pseudoephedrine.

  • 5 Home Safety Threats You Might Overlook

    For safety's sake, look through your home often. Keep an eye out for not-so-obvious hazards.

  • What to Look for on OTC Drug Labels

    Always read the label. All OTC medicine labels have detailed usage and warning information to help you choose and use the products.

  • Home Remedies: What Works? What Doesn't?

    Can cranberry juice help prevent a urinary tract infection? How about cucumbers for puffy eyes? Read on to find out more about home remedies.

  • MRSA

    Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are causing a growing number of infections, both in hospitals and in schools and other community settings.

  • Driving Defensively: Rules of the Road

    No matter how good a driver you are, high speeds or impaired or careless driving by others can place you in danger.

  • Do You Have a Family Disaster Plan?

    Your local emergency management office or American Red Cross chapter is a great place to start.

  • Protect Yourself from Food Contamination

    These tips can help you reduce your risk of becoming ill from the food you eat at home and in restaurants.

  • Stay Safe When You're In the Hospital

    Being active and involved in care decisions and taking extra precautions to avoid infection when in a hospital can help keep you and your family safe.

  • About Balance and Safety

    A balance disorder is a disturbance of the inner ear that can make you feel unsteady or like you're moving or spinning.

  • A Common Plastic Comes Under Scrutiny

    Polycarbonate plastic is durable, impact-resistant, and clear. It is widely used in food and beverage containers, but research has raised concerns over its health effects.

  • Putting Disease Risk into Perspective

    The way we gauge the peril a given disorder poses is called risk perception.

  • Parents: Check Toys for Lead

    If you have toys that have been recalled, don't throw them out. Take them back to the store where they came from.

  • Spring Cleaning: Don't Forget the Medicine Cabinet!
  • Installing and Using Child Safety Seats and Booster Seats

    As part of your preparation for your new baby, you probably got an infant safety seat for the car. But do you know how to make sure it's installed properly? And when do you switch to a child safety seat? Learn the ins and outs of safe car travel for your little one.

  • Today's Radiology Technology Uses Less Radiation
  • How Safe is Nonstick Cookware?

    No research has shown that your blood level of PFOA will go up from using Teflon-coated cookware, but here are some things you should know before you decide to use it.

  • Bullies: Helping Your Child Cope

    Bullying is intentional tormenting that can be physical, social, or psychological. Hitting, shoving, threatening, shunning, and spreading rumors can all be forms of bullying. Kids who experience bullying can become depressed, develop low self-esteem, avoid school, feel physically ill, and even think about killing themselves.

  • How to Make the Move from Crib to Bed

    Moving your child from the crib to a first bed is a milestone event. But more than the bittersweet emotional concerns, your priorities will be safety and a healthy sleep routine.

  • Kids and ID Theft: Helping Your Child Stay Safe on the Computer

    With its range of educational sites and informative encyclopedias, the Internet can be a useful learning tool for kids of all ages. But it can also pose a serious risk: identity theft.

  • Street Smarts: How to Protect Yourself When Walking

    Walking alone on the street--especially as a woman carrying a purse--can still be a dangerous thing to do. You can take a few easy steps to minimize your risk when walking on the street, whether it's at night or any other time. Here are some tips.

  • Older Adults and the Common Cold

    Cold and flu season is hard on everyone, but for older adults who may have chronic health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it's especially challenging.

  • How to Prevent Identity Theft

    Luckily, having your identity stolen is far from inevitable. It just takes a little vigilance on your part to keep your identity safe on your computer and out of the hands of would-be thieves.

  • OTC Medications: Understanding the Risks

    Just because over-the-counter medications are readily available doesn't mean you don't need to follow an OTC drug's directions carefully.

  • Teenagers and Summer Jobs
  • Focusing on Safety at School
  • Job Safety Critical for Teens

    Farming seems to be the most dangerous job. Teens also get hurt in restaurants, supermarkets, retail stores, and other places where they find after-school and summer work.

  • Tackling Kids' Sports Injuries

    Enroll your child in organized sports groups or clubs that demonstrate a commitment to injury prevention. Coaches should be trained in first aid and insist on proper use of safety equipment.

  • In the Campground: Staying Safe

    Planning ahead and being safety-conscious while in the wild can keep everyone safe and secure. Here are suggestions from the U.S. Forest Service and the American Red Cross.