Aspirin Chewable tablet

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN (AS pir in) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever. This medicine is also used as directed by a doctor to prevent and to treat heart attacks, to prevent strokes, and to treat arthritis or inflammation.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • child with chickenpox, the flu, or other viral infection

  • diabetes

  • gout

  • if you frequently drink alcohol containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low level of vitamin K

  • lupus

  • smoke tobacco

  • stomach ulcers or other problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Chew it completely before swallowing. Follow the directions on the package or prescription label. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Children and teenagers should not use this medicine to treat chicken pox or flu symptoms unless directed by a doctor.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you are taking this medicine on a regular schedule and miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cidofovir

  • ketorolac

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • bismuth subsalicylate

  • flavocoxid

  • herbal supplements like feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, horse chestnut

  • medicines for diabetes or glaucoma like acetazolamide, methazolamide

  • medicines for gout

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like enoxaparin, heparin, ticlopidine, warfarin

  • other aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • varicella live vaccine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

If you are treating yourself for pain, tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days, if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Tell your doctor if you see redness or swelling. Also, check with your doctor if you have a fever that lasts for more than 3 days. Only take this medicine to prevent heart attacks or blood clotting if prescribed by your doctor or health care professional.

Do not take aspirin or aspirin-like medicines with this medicine. Too much aspirin can be dangerous. Always read the labels carefully.

This medicine can irritate your stomach or cause bleeding problems. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol while taking this medicine. Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this medicine to prevent irritation to your throat.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing, ringing in the ears

  • confusion

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach gas, heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and moisture. Do not use this medicine if it has a strong vinegar smell. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aspirin Chewing-gum, medicated

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN, ASA (AS pir in) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • child with chickenpox, the flu, or other viral infection

  • diabetes

  • gout

  • if you frequently drink alcohol containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low level of vitamin K

  • lupus

  • smoke tobacco

  • stomach ulcers or other problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Chew this medicine. Do not swallow whole. Follow the directions on the package or prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Children and teenagers should not use this medicine to treat chicken pox or flu symptoms unless directed by a doctor.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cidofovir

  • ketorolac

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • bismuth subsalicylate

  • flavocoxid

  • herbal supplements like feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, horse chestnut

  • medicines for diabetes or glaucoma like acetazolamide, methazolamide

  • medicines for gout

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like enoxaparin, heparin, ticlopidine, warfarin

  • other aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • varicella live vaccine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

If you are treating yourself for pain, tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days, if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Tell your doctor if you see redness or swelling. Also, check with your doctor if you have a fever that lasts for more than 3 days.

Do not take aspirin or aspirin-like medicines with this medicine. Too much aspirin can be dangerous. Always read the labels carefully.

This medicine can irritate your stomach or cause bleeding problems. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol while taking this medicine. Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this medicine to prevent irritation to your throat.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing, ringing in the ears

  • confusion

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach gas, heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and moisture. Do not use this medicine if it has a strong vinegar smell. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aspirin Gastro-resistant tablet

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN (AS pir in) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever. This medicine is also used as directed by a doctor to prevent and to treat heart attacks, to prevent strokes, and to treat arthritis or inflammation.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • child with chickenpox, the flu, or other viral infection

  • diabetes

  • gout

  • if you frequently drink alcohol containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low level of vitamin K

  • lupus

  • smoke tobacco

  • stomach ulcers or other problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the package or prescription label. Do not chew, crush, or cut this medicine. You can take this medicine with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Children and teenagers should not use this medicine to treat chicken pox or flu symptoms unless directed by a doctor.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you are taking this medicine on a regular schedule and miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cidofovir

  • ketorolac

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • bismuth subsalicylate

  • flavocoxid

  • herbal supplements like feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, horse chestnut

  • medicines for diabetes or glaucoma like acetazolamide, methazolamide

  • medicines for gout

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like enoxaparin, heparin, ticlopidine, warfarin

  • other aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • varicella live vaccine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

If you are treating yourself for pain, tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days, if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Tell your doctor if you see redness or swelling. Also, check with your doctor if you have a fever that lasts for more than 3 days. Only take this medicine to prevent heart attacks or blood clotting if prescribed by your doctor or health care professional.

Do not take aspirin or aspirin-like medicines with this medicine. Too much aspirin can be dangerous. Always read the labels carefully.

This medicine can irritate your stomach or cause bleeding problems. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol while taking this medicine. Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this medicine to prevent irritation to your throat.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing, ringing in the ears

  • confusion

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach gas, heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and moisture. Do not use this medicine if it has a strong vinegar smell. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aspirin Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN (AS pir in) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever. This medicine is also used as directed by a doctor to prevent and to treat heart attacks, to prevent strokes, and to treat arthritis or inflammation.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • child with chickenpox, the flu, or other viral infection

  • diabetes

  • gout

  • if you frequently drink alcohol containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low level of vitamin K

  • lupus

  • smoke tobacco

  • stomach ulcers or other problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the package or prescription label. You can take this medicine with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Children and teenagers should not use this medicine to treat chicken pox or flu symptoms unless directed by a doctor.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you are taking this medicine on a regular schedule and miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cidofovir

  • ketorolac

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • bismuth subsalicylate

  • flavocoxid

  • herbal supplements like feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, horse chestnut

  • medicines for diabetes or glaucoma like acetazolamide, methazolamide

  • medicines for gout

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like enoxaparin, heparin, ticlopidine, warfarin

  • other aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • varicella live vaccine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

If you are treating yourself for pain, tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days, if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Tell your doctor if you see redness or swelling. Also, check with your doctor if you have a fever that lasts for more than 3 days. Only take this medicine to prevent heart attacks or blood clotting if prescribed by your doctor or health care professional.

Do not take aspirin or aspirin-like medicines with this medicine. Too much aspirin can be dangerous. Always read the labels carefully.

This medicine can irritate your stomach or cause bleeding problems. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol while taking this medicine. Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this medicine to prevent irritation to your throat.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing, ringing in the ears

  • confusion

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach gas, heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and moisture. Do not use this medicine if it has a strong vinegar smell. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aspirin Oral tablet, extended-release

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN (AS pir in) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever. This medicine is also used as directed by a doctor to prevent and to treat heart attacks, to prevent strokes, and to treat arthritis or inflammation.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • child with chickenpox, the flu, or other viral infection

  • diabetes

  • gout

  • if you frequently drink alcohol containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low level of vitamin K

  • lupus

  • smoke tobacco

  • stomach ulcers or other problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the package or prescription label. Do not chew, crush, or cut this medicine. You can take this medicine with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Children and teenagers should not use this medicine to treat chicken pox or flu symptoms unless directed by a doctor.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you are taking this medicine on a regular schedule and miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cidofovir

  • ketorolac

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • bismuth subsalicylate

  • flavocoxid

  • herbal supplements like feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, horse chestnut

  • medicines for diabetes or glaucoma like acetazolamide, methazolamide

  • medicines for gout

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like enoxaparin, heparin, ticlopidine, warfarin

  • other aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • varicella live vaccine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

If you are treating yourself for pain, tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days, if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Tell your doctor if you see redness or swelling. Also, check with your doctor if you have a fever that lasts for more than 3 days. Only take this medicine to prevent heart attacks or blood clotting if prescribed by your doctor or health care professional.

Do not take aspirin or aspirin-like medicines with this medicine. Too much aspirin can be dangerous. Always read the labels carefully.

This medicine can irritate your stomach or cause bleeding problems. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol while taking this medicine. Do not lie down for 30 minutes after taking this medicine to prevent irritation to your throat.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing, ringing in the ears

  • confusion

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach gas, heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from heat and moisture. Do not use this medicine if it has a strong vinegar smell. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aspirin Rectal suppository

What is this medicine?

ASPIRIN, ASA (AS pir in) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat mild pain and fever.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • anemia

  • asthma

  • bleeding problems

  • child with chickenpox, the flu, or other viral infection

  • diabetes

  • gout

  • if you frequently drink alcohol containing drinks

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low level of vitamin K

  • lupus

  • smoke tobacco

  • stomach ulcers or other problems

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aspirin, tartrazine dye, other medicines, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for rectal use only. Do not take by mouth. Wash your hands before and after use. Take off the foil wrapping. Wet the tip of the suppository with cold tap water to make it easier to use. Lie on your side with your lower leg straightened out and your upper leg bent forward toward your stomach. Lift upper buttock to expose the rectal area. Apply gentle pressure to insert the suppository completely into the rectum, pointed end first. Hold buttocks together for a few seconds. Remain lying down for about 15 minutes to avoid having the suppository come out. Do not use more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply. Children and teenagers should not use this medicine to treat chicken pox or flu symptoms unless directed by a doctor.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • cidofovir

  • ketorolac

  • probenecid

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alcohol

  • alendronate

  • bismuth subsalicylate

  • flavocoxid

  • herbal supplements like feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, horse chestnut

  • medicines for diabetes or glaucoma like acetazolamide, methazolamide

  • medicines for gout

  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like enoxaparin, heparin, ticlopidine, warfarin

  • other aspirin and aspirin-like medicines

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • pemetrexed

  • sulfinpyrazone

  • varicella live vaccine

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

If you are treating yourself for pain, tell your doctor or health care professional if the pain lasts more than 10 days, if it gets worse, or if there is a new or different kind of pain. Tell your doctor if you see redness or swelling. Also, check with your doctor if you have a fever that lasts for more than 3 days.

Do not take aspirin or aspirin-like medicines with this medicine. Too much aspirin can be dangerous. Always read the labels carefully.

This medicine can irritate your stomach or cause bleeding problems. Do not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol while taking this medicine.

If you are scheduled for any medical or dental procedure, tell your healthcare provider that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in hearing, ringing in the ears

  • confusion

  • general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms

  • pain on swallowing

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth or nose

  • signs and symptoms of bleeding such as bloody or black, tarry stools; red or dark-brown urine; spitting up blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds; red spots on the skin; unusual bruising or bleeding from the eye, gums, or nose

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusually weak or tired

  • yellowing of the eyes or skin

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • nausea, vomiting

  • stomach gas, heartburn

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store in the refrigerator between 8 and 15 degrees C (46 and 59 degrees F). Protect from heat and moisture. Do not use this medicine if it has a strong vinegar smell. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.