Adrenocortical Cancer

adrenal glands

Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the outer layer of the adrenal gland.

There are two adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are small and shaped like a triangle. One adrenal gland sits on top of each kidney. Each adrenal gland has two parts. The outer layer of the adrenal gland is the adrenal cortex. The center of the adrenal gland is the adrenal medulla.

The adrenal cortex makes important hormones that:

  • Balance the water and salt in the body.
  • Help keep blood pressure normal.
  • Help control the body's use of protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
  • Cause the body to have masculine or feminine characteristics.

Adrenocortical carcinoma is also called cancer of the adrenal cortex. A tumor of the adrenal cortex may be functioning (makes more hormones than normal) or nonfunctioning (does not make hormones). Most adrenocortical tumors are functioning. The hormones made by functioning tumors may cause certain signs or symptoms of disease.

The adrenal medulla makes hormones that help the body react to stress. Cancer that forms in the adrenal medulla is called pheochromocytoma and is not discussed here.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk.

Risk factors for adrenocortical carcinoma include having any of the following hereditary diseases:

  • Li-Fraumeni syndrome
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome
  • Carney complex

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other symptoms may be caused by adrenocortical carcinoma:

  • A lump in the abdomen.
  • Pain the abdomen or back.
  • A feeling of fullness in the abdomen.

A nonfunctioning adrenocortical tumor may not cause symptoms in the early stages.

A functioning adrenocortical tumor makes too much of one of the following hormones:

  • Cortisol
  • Aldosterone
  • Testosterone
  • Estrogen

Too much cortisol may cause:

  • Weight gain in the face, neck, and trunk of the body and thin arms and legs
  • Growth of fine hair on the face, upper back, or arms
  • A round, red, full face
  • A lump of fat on the back of the neck
  • A deepening of the voice and swelling of the sex organs or breasts in both males and females
  • Muscle weakness
  • High blood sugar
  • High blood pressure

Too much aldosterone may cause:

  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Frequent urination
  • Feeling thirsty

Too much testosterone (in women) may cause:

  • Growth of fine hair on the face, upper back, or arms
  • Acne
  • Balding
  • A deepening of the voice
  • No menstrual periods

Men who make too much testosterone do not usually have symptoms.

Too much estrogen (in women) may cause:

  • Irregular menstrual periods in women who have not gone through menopause
  • Vaginal bleeding in women who have gone through menopause
  • Weight gain

Too much estrogen (in men) may cause:

  • Growth of breast tissue
  • Lower sex drive
  • Impotence

These and other symptoms may be caused by adrenocortical carcinoma. Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. Check with your doctor if you have any of these problems.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

The tests and procedures used to diagnose adrenocortical carcinoma depend on the patient's symptoms. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Twenty-four-hour urine test: A test in which urine is collected for 24 hours to measure the amounts of cortisol or 17-ketosteroids. A higher than normal amount of these in the urine may be a sign of disease in the adrenal cortex.
  • Low-dose dexamethasone suppression test: A test in which one or more small doses of dexamethasone is given. The level of cortisol is checked from a sample of blood or from urine that is collected for three days.
  • High-dose dexamethasone suppression test: A test in which one or more high doses of dexamethasone is given. The level of cortisol is checked from a sample of blood or from urine that is collected for three days.
  • Blood chemistry study: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances, such as potassium or sodium, released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. An unusual (higher or lower than normal) amount of a substance can be a sign of disease.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). An MRI of the abdomen is done to diagnose adrenocortical carcinoma.
  • Adrenal angiography: A procedure to look at the arteries and the flow of blood near the adrenal glands. A contrast dye is injected into the adrenal arteries. As the dye moves through the arteries, a series of x-rays are taken to see if any arteries are blocked.
  • Adrenal venography: A procedure to look at the adrenal veins and the flow of blood near the adrenal glands. A contrast dye is injected into an adrenal vein. As the contrast dye moves through the veins, a series of x-rays are taken to see if any veins are blocked. A catheter (very thin tube) may be inserted into the vein to take a blood sample, which is checked for abnormal hormone levels.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • MIBG scan: A very small amount of radioactive material called MIBG is injected into a vein and travels through the bloodstream. Adrenal gland cells take up the radioactive material and are detected by a device that measures radiation. This scan is done to tell the difference between adrenocortical carcinoma and pheochromocytoma.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. The sample may be taken using a thin needle, called a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy or a wider needle, called a core biopsy.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After adrenocortical carcinoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the adrenal gland or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the adrenal gland or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the abdomen or chest, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) with gadolinium: A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. A substance called gadolinium may be injected into a vein. The gadolinium collects around the cancer cells so they show up brighter in the picture. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs, such as the vena cava, and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram.
  • Adrenalectomy: A procedure to remove the affected adrenal gland. A tissue sample is viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if adrenocortical carcinoma spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually adrenocortical carcinoma cells. The disease is metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma, not lung cancer.

Stages of Adrenocortical Cancer

Stage I

In stage I, the tumor is 5 centimeters or smaller and is found in the adrenal gland only.

Stage II

In stage II, the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters and is found in the adrenal gland only.

Stage III

In stage III, the tumor can be any size and has spread:

  • to fat or lymph nodes near the adrenal gland; or
  • to nearby tissues, but not to the organs near the adrenal gland.

Stage IV

In stage IV, the tumor can be any size and has spread:

  • to nearby tissues and to fat and lymph nodes near the adrenal gland; or
  • to organs near the adrenal gland and may have spread to nearby lymph nodes; or
  • to other parts of the body, such as the liver or lung.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, adrenocortical carcinoma is treated by a team of specialists, including endocrinologists (doctors who specialize in diagnosing and treating hormone disorders), urologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the kidneys and urinary system), surgeons, medical oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with medicine), radiation oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with radiation), nurses, dietitians, and social workers.

Different types of treatments are available for patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Three types of standard treatment are used:

New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Surgery to remove the adrenal gland (adrenalectomy) is often used to treat adrenocortical carcinoma. Sometimes surgery is done to
remove the nearby lymph nodes and other tissue where the cancer has spread.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). Combination chemotherapy is treatment using more than one anticancer drug. The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Clinical trials

This describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. Information about clinical trials is available from HCI's clinical trials website.

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient's immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body's natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, work, or normal daily life.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has free resources and books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to HCI patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website April 2014

El carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal es una enfermedad poco frecuente por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en la capa exterior de la glándula suprarrenal.

Hay dos glándulas suprarrenales. Las glándulas suprarrenales son pequeñas y con forma de triángulo. Cada glándula suprarrenal se ubica encima de cada riñón. Cada glándula suprarrenal tiene dos partes. La capa exterior de la glándula suprarrenal es la corteza suprarrenal. El centro de la glándula suprarrenal es la médula suprarrenal.

La corteza suprarrenal elabora hormonas importantes que realizan las siguientes funciones:

  • Mantienen el equilibrio del agua y la sal en el cuerpo.
  • Ayudan a mantener normal la presión arterial.
  • Ayudan a controlar el uso que hace el cuerpo de las proteínas, las grasas y los carbohidratos.
  • Hacen que el cuerpo tenga características masculinas o femeninas.

El carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal también se llama cáncer de corteza suprarrenal. Un tumor de corteza suprarrenal puede ser funcionante (elabora más hormonas que lo normal) o no funcionante (no elabora hormonas). La mayoría de los tumores de la corteza suprarrenal son funcionante. Las hormonas que producen los tumores funcionantes pueden causar ciertos signos o síntomas de enfermedad.

La médula suprarrenal elabora hormonas que ayudan al cuerpo a reaccionar ante la tensión. El cáncer que se forma en la médula suprarrenal se llama feocromocitoma y no se trata en este sumario.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumente el riesgo de padecer de una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se padecerá de cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se padecerá de cáncer. Hable con su médico si usted piensa que está en riesgo.

Los factores de riesgo de carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal incluyen tener las siguientes enfermedades hereditarias:

  • Síndrome de Li-Fraumeni.
  • Síndrome de Beckwith-Wiedemann.
  • Complejo de Carney.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Los siguientes síntomas y otros se pueden deber a un carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal:

  • Masa en el abdomen.
  • Dolor en el abdomen o la espalda.
  • Sensación de saciedad en el abdomen.

Un tumor de corteza suprarrenal no funcionante puede no causar síntomas en los estadios más tempranos.

Un tumor de corteza suprarrenal funcionante elabora demasiada cantidad de una de las siguientes hormonas:

  • Cortisol
  • Aldosterona
  • Testosterona
  • Estrógeno

Demasiado cortisol puede causar los siguientes síntomas:

  • Aumento de peso en la cara, el cuello y el tronco del cuerpo; brazos y piernas delgadas.
  • Crecimiento de vello en la cara, la parte superior de la espalda o los brazos.
  • Cara redonda, roja y llena.
  • Masa de grasa en la nuca.
  • Profundización de la voz e hinchazón de los órganos sexuales o las mamas, tanto en hombres como mujeres.
  • Debilidad muscular.
  • Concentración alta de azúcar en la sangre.
  • Presión arterial alta.

Demasiada aldosterona puede causar los siguientes síntomas:

  • Presión arterial alta.
  • Debilidad muscular o calambres.
  • Micción frecuente.
  • Sensación de sed.

Demasiada testosterona (en las mujeres) puede causar los siguientes síntomas:

  • Crecimiento de vello en la cara, la parte superior de la espalda o los brazos
  • Acné
  • Calvici
  • Profundización de la voz
  • Ausencia de períodos menstruales

Los hombres que producen demasiada testosterona habitualmente no tienen síntomas.

Demasiado estrógeno (en las mujeres) puede causar los siguientes síntomas:

  • Períodos menstruales irregulares en las mujeres que no pasaron la menopausia.
  • Sangrado vaginal en mujeres que pasaron la menopausia.
  • Aumento de peso.

Demasiado estrógeno (en los hombres) puede causar los siguientes síntomas:

  • Crecimiento del tejido de las mamas
  • Menor tendencia sexual
  • Impotencia

Estos síntomas y otros se pueden deber a un carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal. Otras afecciones pueden causar los mismos síntomas. Consulte con su médico si se presenta cualquiera de estos problemas.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal se usan estudios de imágenes y pruebas que examinan la sangre y la orina.

Las pruebas y procedimientos que se usan para diagnosticar un carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal dependen de los síntomas del paciente. Se pueden usar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para verificar los signos generales de salud, incluso los signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se toman los antecedentes de los hábitos de salud, y las enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores del paciente.
  • Análisis de orina durante 24 horas: prueba para la que se recoge orina durante 24 horas para medir las cantidades de cortisol o de 17-cetosteroides. Una cantidad superior a lo normal de estos en la orina puede ser un signo de enfermedad de corteza suprarrenal.
  • Prueba de supresión con dosis bajas de dexametasona: prueba para la cual se administra una o más dosis bajas de dexametasona. Se verifica la concentración de cortisol en una muestra de sangre o de la orina que se recoge durante tres días.
  • Prueba de supresión con dosis altas de dexametasona: prueba para la cual se administra una o más dosis altas de dexametasona. Se verifica la concentración de cortisol en una muestra de sangre o de la orina que se recoge durante tres días.
  • Estudios químicos de la sangre: procedimiento por el que se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias, como potasio y sodio, liberadas a la sangre por los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo. Una cantidad no habitual (mayor o menor que lo normal) de una sustancia puede ser signo de enfermedad.
  • Exploración con TC (exploración con TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN). Para diagnosticar un carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal, se realiza una exploración por TC del abdomen.
  • Angiografía suprarrenal: procedimiento usado para observar las arterias y el flujo de sangre cerca de las glándulas suprarrenales. Se inyecta un tinte en las arterias suprarrenales. A medida de que el tinte circula por las arterias, se toma una serie de rayos X para determinar si hay alguna arteria bloqueada.
  • Venografía suprarrenal: procedimiento usado para observar las venas suprarrenales y el flujo de sangre cerca de la glándula suprarrenal. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena suprarrenal. A medida de que el tinte circula por la vena, se toma una serie de rayos X para determinar si hay venas bloqueadas. Se puede insertar un catéter (tubo muy delgado) en la vena para tomar una muestra de sangre, que se analiza para verificar si hay concentraciones anormales de hormonas.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El escáner de TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que utilizan la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • Exploración con MIBG: se inyecta en una vena una cantidad muy pequeña de un material radiactivo que se llama MIBG y este circula por el torrente sanguíneo. Las células de la glándula suprarrenal absorben el material radiactivo y se detectan con un dispositivo que mide la radiación. Esta exploración se realiza para determinar la diferencia entre un carcinoma suprarrenal y un feocromocitoma.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo los observe bajo un microscopio y determine si hay signos de cáncer. La muestra se puede tomar con una aguja fina y esto se llama biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina (AAF) o con una aguja gruesa, que se llama biopsia central.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticarse el carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de la glándula suprarrenal o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el carcinoma se diseminó dentro de la glándula suprarrenal o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante saber en qué estadio se encuentra la enfermedad para poder planificar su tratamiento. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas en el proceso de estadificación:

  • Exploración con TC (exploración con TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, como el abdomen o el pecho, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética) con gadolinio: procedimiento para el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia llamada gadolinio, que se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas y las hace aparecer más brillantes en la imagen. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento que se usa para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta una pequeña cantidad de glucosa (azúcar) radioactiva en una vena. El escáner de la TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y produce una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos se ven más brillantes en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento por el cual se hacen rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía en tejidos u órganos internos, como la vena cava, y se crean ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama ecograma.
  • Adrenalectomía: procedimiento para extirpar la glándula suprarrenal afectada. Un patólogo observa una muestra de tejido bajo un microscopio para determinar si hay signos de cáncer.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras.

El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo.

Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el del tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si un carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal se disemina hasta el pulmón, las células cancerosas en el pulmón son, en realidad, células cancerosas de carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal. La enfermedad es carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal metastásico, no es cáncer de pulmón.

Para el carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal, se usan los siguientes estadios:

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el tumor mide cinco centímetros o menos y se encuentra solo en la glándula suprarrenal.

Estadio II

En el estadio II, el tumor mide más de cinco centímetros y se encuentra solo en la glándula suprarrenal.

Estadio III

En el estadio III, el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y se diseminó:

  • Hasta la grasa o los ganglios linfáticos cercanos a la glándula suprarrenal; o
  • Hasta los tejidos cercanos, pero no hasta los órganos cerca de la glándula suprarrenal.

Estadio IV

En el estadio lV, el tumor puede tener cualquier tamaño y se diseminó:

  • Hasta los tejidos cercano y hasta la grasa y los ganglios linfáticos cercanos a la glándula suprarrenal; o
  • Hasta órganos cerca de las glándulas suprarrenales y se pudo haber diseminado a los ganglios linfáticos cercanos; o
  • Hasta otras partes del cuerpo, como el hígado o el pulmón.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Antes de iniciar el tratamiento, el paciente debería pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan tres tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La cirugía para extirpar la glándula suprarrenal (adrenalectomía) se usa con frecuencia para tratar el carcinoma de corteza suprarrenal. A veces, se realiza una cirugía para extirpar los ganglios linfáticos cercanos y otros tejidos hasta donde se diseminó el cáncer.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer que utiliza rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células
cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo para enviar radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna usa una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente dentro del cáncer o cerca de él. La manera en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para detener el crecimiento de células cancerosas, ya sea destruyéndolas o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por vía oral o se inyecta en una vena o en un músculo, los medicamentos entran al torrente sanguíneo y pueden alcanzar las células cancerosas en todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia
sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas en esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La quimioterapia
combinada es un tratamiento para el que se usan más de un medicamento contra el cáncer. La manera en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

La terapia biológica es un tratamiento que usa el sistema inmunitario del paciente para combatir el cáncer. Se usan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o producidas en un laboratorio para impulsar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra el cáncer. Este tipo de tratamiento del cáncer también se llama bioterapia o inmunoterapia.

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento para el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y tratar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

Scott ClarkUrology Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Scott Clark
Phone: 801-587-4381
E-mail: scott.clark@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease in which cancer cells form in the outer layer of the adrenal gland.
  • Having certain genetic conditions (Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, Carney complex) increases the risk of developing cancer of the adrenal gland.
  • Doctors use three types of treatment to treat adrenocortical carcinoma: surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.
clc graphic right column