Brain Tumors

brain

An adult brain tumor is a disease in which abnormal cells form in the tissues of the brain.

There are many types of brain and spinal cord tumors. The tumors are formed by the abnormal growth of cells and may begin in different parts of the brain or spinal cord. Together, the brain and spinal cord make up the central nervous system (CNS).

The tumors may be either benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer):

  • Benign brain and spinal cord tumors grow and press on nearby areas of the brain. They rarely spread into other tissues and may recur (come back).
  • Malignant brain and spinal cord tumors are likely to grow quickly and spread into other brain tissue.

When a tumor grows into or presses on an area of the brain, it may stop that part of the brain from working the way it should. Both benign and malignant brain tumors cause symptoms and need treatment.

Brain and spinal cord tumors can occur in both adults and children. However, treatment for children may be different than treatment for adults. (See Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Treatment Overview for more information on the treatment of children.)

A brain tumor that starts in another part of the body and spreads to the brain is called a metastatic tumor.

Tumors that start in the brain are called primary brain tumors. Primary brain tumors may spread to other parts of the brain or to the spine. They rarely spread to other parts of the body.

Often, tumors found in the brain have started somewhere else in the body and spread to one or more parts of the brain. These are called metastatic brain tumors (or brain metastases). Metastatic brain tumors are more common than primary brain tumors.

About half of metastatic brain tumors are from lung cancer. Other types of cancer that commonly spread to the brain are melanoma and cancer of the breast, colon, kidney, nasopharynx, and unknown primary site. Leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, and gastrointestinal cancer may spread to the leptomeninges (the two innermost membranes covering the brain and spinal cord). This is called leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

The brain has three major parts:

  • The cerebrum is the largest part of the brain. It is at the top of the head. The cerebrum controls thinking, learning, problem solving, emotions, speech, reading, writing, and voluntary movement.
  • The cerebellum is in the lower back of the brain (near the middle of the back of the head). It controls movement, balance, and posture.
  • The brain stem connects the brain to the spinal cord. It is in the lowest part of the brain (just above the back of the neck). The brain stem controls breathing, heart rate, and the nerves and muscles used to see, hear, walk, talk, and eat.

Brain and spinal cord tumors are named based on the type of cell they formed in and where the tumor first formed in the CNS. The grade of a tumor may be used to tell the difference between slow-growing and fast-growing types of the tumor. The grade of a tumor is based on how abnormal the cancer cells look under a microscope and how quickly the tumor is likely to grow and spread.

Tumor Grading System

  • Grade I (low-grade) — The tumor grows slowly, has cells that look a lot like normal cells, and rarely spreads into nearby tissues. Grade I brain tumors may be cured if they are completely removed by surgery.
  • Grade II — The tumor grows slowly, but may spread into nearby tissue and may recur (come back). Some tumors may become a higher-grade tumor.
  • Grade III — The tumor grows quickly, is likely to spread into nearby tissue, and the tumor cells look very different from normal cells.
  • Grade IV (high-grade) — The tumor grows and spreads very quickly and the cells do not look like normal cells. There may be areas of dead cells in the tumor. Grade IV tumors usually cannot be cured.

The following types of tumors can form in the brain or spinal cord:

Astrocytic Tumors

An astrocytic tumor begins in star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes, which help keep nerve cells healthy. An astrocyte is a type of glial cell. Glial cells sometimes form tumors called gliomas. Astrocytic tumors include the following:

  • Brain stem glioma (usually high grade): A brain stem glioma forms in the brain stem, which is the part of the brain connected to the spinal cord. It is often a high-grade tumor, which spreads widely through the brain stem and is hard to cure. Brain stem gliomas are rare in adults. (See the PDQ summary on Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment for more information.)
  • Pineal astrocytic tumor (any grade): A pineal astrocytic tumor forms in tissue around the pineal gland and may be any grade. The pineal gland is a tiny organ in the brain that makes melatonin, a hormone that helps control the sleeping and waking cycle.
  • Pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I): A pilocytic astrocytoma grows slowly in the brain or spinal cord. It may be in the form of a cyst and rarely spreads into nearby tissues. Pilocytic astrocytomas can often be cured.
  • Diffuse astrocytoma (grade II): A diffuse astrocytoma grows slowly, but often spreads into nearby tissues. The tumor cells look something like normal cells. In some cases, a diffuse astrocytoma can be cured. It is also called a low-grade diffuse astrocytoma.
  • Anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III): An anaplastic astrocytoma grows quickly and spreads into nearby tissues. The tumor cells look different from normal cells. This type of tumor usually cannot be cured. An anaplastic astrocytoma is also called a malignant astrocytoma or high-grade astrocytoma.
  • Glioblastoma (grade IV): A glioblastoma grows and spreads very quickly. The tumor cells look very different from normal cells. This type of tumor usually cannot be cured. It is also called glioblastoma multiforme.

Oligodendroglial Tumors

An oligodendroglial tumor begins in brain cells called oligodendrocytes, which help keep nerve cells healthy. An oligodendrocyte is a type of glial cell. Oligodendrocytes sometimes form tumors called oligodendrogliomas. Grades of oligodendroglial tumors include the following:

  • Oligodendroglioma (grade II): An oligodendroglioma grows slowly, but often spreads into nearby tissues. The tumor cells look something like normal cells. In some cases, an oligodendroglioma can be cured.
  • Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (grade III): An anaplastic oligodendroglioma grows quickly and spreads into nearby tissues. The tumor cells look different from normal cells. This type of tumor usually cannot be cured.

Mixed Gliomas

A mixed glioma is a brain tumor that has two types of tumor cells in it — oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. This type of mixed tumor is called an oligoastrocytoma.

  • Oligoastrocytoma (grade II): An oligoastrocytoma is a slow-growing tumor. The tumor cells look something like normal cells. In some cases, an oligoastrocytoma can be cured.
  • Anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (grade III): An anaplastic oligoastrocytoma grows quickly and spreads into nearby tissues. The tumor cells look different from normal cells. This type of tumor has a worse prognosis than oligoastrocytoma (grade II).

Ependymal Tumors

An ependymal tumor usually begins in cells that line the fluid -filled spaces in the brain and around the spinal cord. An ependymal tumor may also be called an ependymoma. Grades of ependymomas include the following:

  • Ependymoma (grade I or II): A grade I or II ependymoma grows slowly and has cells that look something like normal cells. There are two types of grade I ependymoma — myxopapillary ependymoma and subependymoma. A grade II ependymoma grows in a ventricle (fluid-filled space in the brain) and its connecting paths or in the spinal cord. In some cases, a grade I or II ependymoma can be cured.
  • Anaplastic ependymoma (grade III): An anaplastic ependymoma grows quickly and spreads into nearby tissues. The tumor cells look different from normal cells. This type of tumor usually has a worse prognosis than a grade I or II ependymoma.

Medulloblastomas

A medulloblastoma is a type of embryonal tumor. Medulloblastomas are most common in children or young adults.

Pineal Parenchymal Tumors

A pineal parenchymal tumor forms in parenchymal cells or pineocytes, which are the cells that make up most of the pineal gland. These tumors are different from pineal astrocytic tumors. Grades of pineal parenchymal tumors include the following:

  • Pineocytoma (grade II): A pineocytoma is a slow-growing pineal tumor.
  • Pineoblastoma (grade IV): A pineoblastoma is a rare tumor that is very likely to spread.

Meningeal Tumors

A meningeal tumor, also called a meningioma, forms in the meninges (thin layers of tissue that cover the brain and spinal cord). It can form from different types of brain or spinal cord cells. Meningiomas are most common in adults. Types of meningeal tumors include the following:

  • Meningioma (grade I): A grade I meningioma is the most common type of meningeal tumor. A grade I meningioma is a slow-growing tumor. It forms most often in the dura mater. A grade I meningioma can be cured if it is completely removed by surgery.
  • Meningioma (grade II and III): This is a rare meningeal tumor. It grows quickly and is likely to spread within the brain and spinal cord. The prognosis is worse than a grade I meningioma because the tumor usually cannot be completely removed by surgery.

A hemangiopericytoma is not a meningeal tumor but is treated like a grade II or III meningioma. A hemangiopericytoma usually forms in the dura mater. The prognosis is worse than a grade I meningioma because the tumor usually cannot be completely removed by surgery.

Germ Cell Tumors

A germ cell tumor forms in germ cells, which are the cells that develop into sperm in men or ova (eggs) in women. There are different types of germ cell tumors. These include germinomas, teratomas, embryonal yolk sac carcinomas, and choriocarcinomas. Germ cell tumors can be either benign or malignant.

Craniopharyngioma (Grade I)

A craniopharyngioma is a rare tumor that usually forms just above the pituitary gland (a pea-sized organ at the bottom of the brain that controls other glands). Craniopharyngiomas can form from different types of brain or spinal cord cells. They begin in the center of the brain, just above the back of the nose.

Recurrent Brain Tumors

A recurrent brain tumor is a tumor that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. Brain tumors often recur, sometimes many years after the first tumor. The tumor may recur at the same place in the brain or in other parts of the central nervous system.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

 

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. There are few known risk factors for brain tumors. The following conditions may increase the risk of certain types of brain tumors:

  • Being exposed to vinyl chloride may increase the risk of glioma.
  • Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, having AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), or receiving an organ transplant may increase the risk of primary CNS lymphoma. (See the PDQ summary on Primary CNS Lymphoma for more information.)
  • Having certain genetic syndromes may increase the risk brain tumors:
    • Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) or 2 (NF2).
    • von Hippel-Lindau disease.
    • Tuberous sclerosis.
    • Li-Fraumeni syndrome.
    • Turcot syndrome type 1 or 2.
    • Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

The cause of most adult brain and spinal cord tumors is unknown.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

The symptoms caused by a primary brain tumor depend on where the tumor begins in the brain, what that part of the brain controls, and the size of the tumor. Headaches and other symptoms may be caused by brain tumors. Other conditions, including cancer that has spread to the brain, may cause the same symptoms. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:Brain Tumors

  • Morning headache or headache that goes away after vomiting.
  • Frequent nausea and vomiting.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Vision, hearing, and speech problems.
  • Loss of balance and trouble walking.
  • Weakness.
  • Unusual sleepiness or change in activity level.
  • Changes in personality, mood, ability to focus, or behavior.
  • Seizures.

Spinal Cord Tumors

  • Back pain or pain that spreads from the back towards the arms or legs.
  • A change in bowel habits or trouble urinating.
  • Weakness in the legs.
  • Trouble walking.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the brain and spinal cord are used to diagnose adult brain and spinal cord tumors.

The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Neurological exam: A series of questions and tests to check the brain, spinal cord, and nerve function. The exam checks a person’s mental status, coordination, and ability to walk normally, and how well the muscles, senses, and reflexes work. This may also be called a neuro exam or a neurologic exam.
  • Visual field exam: An exam to check a person’s field of vision (the total area in which objects can be seen). This test measures both central vision (how much a person can see when looking straight ahead) and peripheral vision (how much a person can see in all other directions while staring straight ahead). Any loss of vision may be a sign of a tumor that has damaged or pressed on the parts of the brain that affect eyesight.
  • Tumor marker test: A procedure in which a sample of blood, urine, or tissue is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances made by organs, tissues, or tumor cells in the body. Certain substances are linked to specific types of cancer when found in increased levels in the body. These are called tumor markers. This test may be done to diagnose a germ cell tumor.
  • Gene testing: A laboratory test in which a sample of blood or tissue is tested for changes in a chromosome that has been linked with a certain type of brain tumor. This test may be done to diagnose an inherited syndrome.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) with gadolinium: A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of the brain and spinal cord. A substance called gadolinium is injected into a vein. The gadolinium collects around the cancer cells so they show up brighter in the picture. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). Sometimes a procedure called magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is done during the MRI scan. An MRS is used to diagnose tumors, based on their chemical make-up. MRI is often used to diagnose tumors in the spinal cord.
  • SPECT scan (single photon emission computed tomography scan): A procedure that uses a special camera linked to a computer to make a 3-dimensional(3-D) picture of the brain. A small amount of a radioactive substance is injected into a vein or inhaled through the nose. As the substance travels through the blood, the camera rotates around the head and takes pictures of the brain. Blood flow and metabolism are higher than normal in areas where cancer cells are growing. These areas will show up brighter in the picture. This procedure may be done just before or after a CT scan. SPECT is used to tell the difference between a primary tumor and a tumor that has spread to the brain from somewhere else in the body.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the brain. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do. PET is used to tell the difference between a primary tumor and a tumor that has spread to the brain from somewhere else in the body.
  • Angiogram: A procedure to look at blood vessels and the flow of blood in the brain. A contrast dye is injected into the blood vessel. As the contrast dye moves through the blood vessel, x-rays are taken to see if the vessel is blocked.

A biopsy is also used to diagnose a brain tumor. If imaging tests show there may be a brain tumor, a biopsy is usually done. One of the following types of biopsies may be used:

  • Stereotactic biopsy: When imaging tests show there may be a tumor deep in the brain in a hard to reach place, a stereotactic brain biopsy may be done. This kind of biopsy uses a computer and a 3-dimensional scanning device to find the tumor and guide the needle used to remove the tissue. A small incision is made in the scalp and a small hole is drilled through the skull. A biopsy needle is inserted through the hole to remove cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer.
  • Open biopsy: When imaging tests show that there may be a tumor that can be removed by surgery, an open biopsy may be done. A part of the skull is removed in an operation called a craniotomy. A sample of brain tissue is removed and viewed under a microscope by a pathologist. If cancer cells are found, some or all of the tumor may be removed during the same surgery. Tests are done before surgery to find the areas around the tumor that are important for normal brain function. There are also ways to test brain function during surgery. The doctor will use the results of these tests to remove as much of the tumor as possible with the least damage to normal tissue in the brain.

The pathologist checks the biopsy sample to find out the type and grade of brain tumor. The grade of the tumor is based on how the tumor cells look under a microscope and how quickly the tumor is likely to grow and spread.

The following tests may be done on the tumor tissue that is removed:

  • Immunohistochemistry study: A laboratory test in which a substance such as an antibody, dye, or radioisotope is added to a sample of cancer tissue to test for certain antigens. This type of study is used to tell the difference between different types of cancer.
  • Light and electron microscopy: A laboratory test in which cells in a sample of tissue are viewed under regular and high-powered microscopes to look for certain changes in the cells.
  • Cytogenetic analysis: A laboratory test in which cells in a sample of tissue are viewed under a microscope to look for certain changes in the chromosomes.

Sometimes a biopsy or surgery cannot be done. For some tumors, a biopsy or surgery cannot be done safely because of where the tumor formed in the brain or spinal cord. These tumors are diagnosed and treated based on the results of imaging tests and other procedures.

Sometimes the results of imaging tests and other procedures show that the tumor is very likely to be benign and a biopsy is not done.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

There is no standard staging system for adult brain and spinal cord tumors.

The extent or spread of cancer is usually described as stages. There is no standard staging system for brain and spinal cord tumors. Brain tumors that begin in the brain may spread to other parts of the brain and spinal cord, but they rarely spread to other parts of the body. Treatment of brain and spinal cord tumors is based the following:

  • The type of cell in which the tumor began.
  • Where the tumor formed in the brain or spinal cord.
  • The amount of cancer left after surgery.
  • The grade of the tumor.

Treatment of brain tumors that have spread to the brain from other parts of the body is based on the number of tumors in the brain. Some of the tests and procedures used to diagnose a brain or spinal cord tumor may be repeated after treatment to find out how much tumor is left.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, brain tumors are treated by a team of specialists, including neurologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the brain), neurosurgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers, dieticians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with adult brain and spinal cord tumors. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Four types of standard treatment are used:

  • Watchful waiting
  • Surgery
  • Radiation therapy
  • Chemotherapy

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Watchful Waiting

Watchful waiting is closely monitoring a patient’s condition without giving any treatment until symptoms appear or change.

Surgery

Surgery may be used to diagnose and treat adult brain and spinal cord tumors. Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after the surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type of tumor and where it is in the brain or spinal cord.

The following ways of giving radiation therapy to the tumor cause less damage to the healthy tissue that is around the tumor:

  • 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy: A procedure that uses a computer to create a 3-dimensional (3-D) picture of the brain or spinal cord tumor. This allows doctors to give the highest possible dose of radiation to the tumor, with as little damage to normal tissue as possible. This type of radiation therapy is also called 3-dimensional radiation therapy and 3D-CRT.
  • Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): A type of 3-D radiation therapy that uses a computer to make pictures of the size and shape of the brain or spinal cord tumor. Thin beams of radiation of different intensities (strengths) are aimed at the tumor from many angles. This type of radiation therapy causes less damage to healthy tissue near the tumor.
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery: A type of radiation therapy that uses a head frame attached to the skull to aim a single large dose of radiation directly to a brain tumor. This causes less damage to nearby healthy tissue. Stereotactic radiosurgery is also called stereotaxic radiosurgery, radiosurgery, and radiation surgery. This procedure does not involve surgery.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). Combination chemotherapy is treatment using more than one anticancer drug. To treat brain tumors, a wafer that dissolves may be used to deliver an anticancer drug directly to the brain tumor site after the tumor has been removed by surgery. The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type of tumor and where it is in the brain.

Anticancer drugs given by mouth or vein to treat brain and spinal cord tumors cannot cross the blood-brain barrier and enter the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. Instead, an anticancer drug is injected into the fluid-filled space to kill cancer cells there. This is called intrathecal chemotherapy.

Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Clinical trials

This section refers to new treatments being studied in clinical trials, but it may not mention every new treatment being studied. For more information visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Proton beam radiation therapy is a type of high-energy, external radiation therapy that uses streams of protons (small, positively-charged pieces of matter) to make radiation. This type of radiation kills tumor cells with little damage to nearby tissues. It is used to treat cancers of the head, neck, and spine and organs such as the brain, eye, lung, and prostate. Proton beam radiation is different from x-ray radiation. 

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.

Biologic therapy is being studied for the treatment of some types of brain tumors. Treatments may include the following:

  • Tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy.
  • Dendritic cell vaccine therapy.
  • Gene therapy.

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center as hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist. 
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

 

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website April 2014

 

Un tumor cerebral en adultos es una enfermedad por la que se forman células anormales en los tejidos del cerebro.

Hay muchos tipos de tumores del cerebro y la médula espinal. Los tumores se forman debido al crecimiento anormal de células y puede comenzar en distintas partes del cerebro o la médula espinal. El cerebro y la médula espinal forman juntos el sistema nervioso central (SNC).

Los tumores pueden ser benignos (no cancerosos) o malignos (cancerosos):
  • Los tumores del cerebro y la médula espinal benignos crecen y hacen presión en las áreas cercanas del cerebro. Muy pocas veces se diseminan a otros tejidos y pueden recidivar (volver).
  • Los tumores del cerebro y la médula espinal malignos tienen la tendencia a crecer rápido y diseminarse a otros tejidos del cerebro

Cuando un tejido crece en un área del cerebro o la presiona, puede impedir que esa parte del cerebro funcione correctamente. Tanto los tumores cerebrales benignos y malignos producen síntomas y necesitan tratamiento.

Un tumor cerebral que empieza en otra parte del cuerpo y se disemina hasta el cerebro se llama tumor metastásico.

Los tumores cerebrales que empiezan en el cerebro se llaman tumores cerebrales primarios. Estos tumores se pueden diseminar a otras partes del cerebro o a la espina dorsal y muy pocas veces lo hacen a otras partes del cuerpo.

A menudo, los tumores que se encuentran en el cerebro comenzaron en otra parte del cuerpo y se diseminan a una o más partes del cerebro. Estos se llaman tumores cerebrales metastásicos (o metástasis cerebral). Los tumores cerebrales metastásicos son más comunes que los tumores cerebrales primarios.

Alrededor de la mitad de los tumores cerebrales metastásicos son de cáncer de pulmón. Otros tipos de cáncer que generalmente se diseminan hasta el cerebro son el melanoma y el cáncer de mama, colon, riñón, nasofaringe y de sitio primario desconocido. La leucemia, el linfoma, el cáncer de mama y el cáncer gastrointestinal se pueden diseminar a las leptomeninges (las dos membranas más internas que cubren el cerebro y la médula espinal). Esto se llama carcinomatosis leptomeníngea.

Las tres partes más importantes del cerebro son las siguientes:

  • El encéfalo es la parte más grande del cerebro. Está en la parte superior de la cabeza. El encéfalo controla el pensamiento, el aprendizaje, la solución de problemas, las emociones, el habla, la lectura, la redacción y el movimiento voluntario.
  • El cerebelo está en la región inferior y posterior del cerebro (cerca de la mitad posterior de la cabeza). Controla el movimiento, el equilibrio y la postura.
  • El tronco encefálico conecta el cerebro con la médula espinal. Está en la parte más baja del cerebro (justo arriba de la parte de atrás del cuello). El tronco encefálico controla la respiración, la frecuencia cardíaca, y los nervios y músculos que se usan para ver, oír, caminar, hablar y comer.

La médula espinal conecta el cerebro con los nervios de la mayoría de las partes del cuerpo.

La médula espinal es una columna de tejido nervioso que va desde el tronco encefálico hacia abajo, por el centro de la espalda. Está cubierta por tres capas delgadas de tejido que se llaman membranas. Estas membranas están rodeadas por las vértebras (los huesos de la espalda). La médula espinal lleva los mensajes entre el cerebro y el resto del cuerpo, como una señal del cerebro que hace mover los músculos, o de la piel al cerebro que siente calor.

Hay diferentes tipos de tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal.

Los tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal se llaman según el tipo de célula con los que se forman y el lugar del cerebro en el SNC donde se forman primero. Se puede usar el grado del tumor para indicar la diferencia entre los tipos de tumores de crecimiento lento y los de crecimiento rápido. El grado del tumor se basa en qué tan anormal es el aspecto de las células examinadas bajo un microscopio y en la probable rapidez en que el tumor pueda crecer y diseminarse.

Sistema de graduación de los tumores

  • Grado I (grado bajo): el tumor crece lentamente, tiene células con un aspecto muy parecido al de las células normales y se disemina muy raramente hasta los tejidos cercanos. Los tumores cerebrales de grado I se pueden curar si se extirpan por completo por medio de cirugía.
  • Grado II: el tumor crece lentamente, pero se puede diseminar hasta el tejido cercano y puede recidivar (volver). Algunos tumores se pueden convertir en tumores de grado más alto.
  • Grado III: el tumor crece rápidamente, es probable que se disemine hasta el tejido cercano y sus células tienen un aspecto muy distinto del de las células normales.
  • Grado IV (grado alto): el tumor crece y se disemina muy rápido y el aspecto de las células no es como el de las células normales. El tumor puede tener áreas de células muertas. Con frecuencia, los tumores de grado IV no se pueden curar.

Los tipos de tumores siguientes se pueden formar en el cerebro o en la médula espinal:

Tumores astrocíticos

Un tumor astrocítico empieza en las células del cerebro con forma de estrella que se llaman astrocitos y que sirven para ayudar a que las células nerviosas se mantengan sanas. Un astrocito es un tipo de célula neuroglial. Algunas veces estas células forman tumores que se llaman gliomas. Dentro de los tumores astrocíticos se incluyen los siguientes:

  • Glioma del tronco encefálico (a menudo de grado alto): un glioma del tronco encefálico se forma en el tronco encefálico, que es la parte del cerebro conectada a la médula espinal. A menudo es un tumor de grado alto que se disemina ampliamente por el tronco encefálico y es difícil de curar. Los gliomas del tronco encefálico son poco frecuentes en los adultos. (Para mayor información, consultar el sumario del PDQ sobre Tratamiento del glioma de tronco encefálico infantil).
  • Tumor astrocítico pineal (de cualquier grado): un tumor astrocítico pineal se forma en el tejido que rodea la glándula pineal y puede ser de cualquier grado. La glándula pineal es un órgano diminuto del cerebro que elabora melatonina, una hormona que ayuda a controlar el ciclo del sueño y la vigilia.
  • Astrocitoma pilocítico (grado I): un astrocitoma pilocítico crece lentamente en el cerebro o la médula espinal. Puede tener forma de quiste y pocas veces se disemina hasta los tejidos cercanos. Con frecuencia, los astrocitomas pilocíticos se pueden curar.
  • Astrocitoma difuso (grado II): un astrocitoma difuso crece lentamente, pero a menudo se disemina hasta los tejidos cercanos. Las células tumorales tienen aspecto de células normales. En algunos casos, un astrocitoma difuso se puede curar. También se llama astrocitoma difuso de grado bajo.
  • Astrocitoma anaplásico (grado III): un astrocitoma anaplásico crece rápido y se disemina hasta los tejidos cercanos. Las células tumorales tienen un aspecto diferente al de las células normales. Por lo general, este tipo de tumor no se puede curar. El astrocitoma anaplásico también se llama astrocitoma maligno o astrocitoma de grado alto.
  • Glioblastoma (grado IV): un glioblastoma crece y se disemina muy rápido. Las células tumorales tienen un aspecto muy diferente al de las células normales. Por lo general, este tipo de tumor no se puede curar. También se llama glioblastoma multiforme.

Tumores oligodendrogliales

Un tumor oligodendroglial empieza en las células del cerebro que se llaman oligodendrocitos, que ayuda a mantener sanas las células nerviosas. Un oligodendrocito es un tipo de célula neuroglial. Los oligodendrocitos forman a menudo tumores que se llaman oligodendrogliomas. Los grados de los tumores oligodendrogliales son los siguientes:

  • Oligodendroglioma (grado II): un oligodendroglioma crece de lentamente, pero a menudo se disemina a los tejidos cercanos. Las células tumorales tienen un aspecto similar al de las células normales. En algunos casos, un oligodendroglioma se puede curar.
  • Oligodendroglioma anaplásico (grado III): un oligodendroglioma anaplásico crece rápido y se disemina al tejido cercano. Las células tumorales tienen un aspecto diferente al de las células normales. Con frecuencia, este tipo de tumor no se puede curar.
Gliomas mixtos

Un glioma mixto es un tumor cerebral que contiene dos tipos de células tumorales: oligodendrocitos y astrocitos. Este tipo de tumores mixtos se llaman oligoastrocitomas.

  • Oligoastrocitoma (grado II): un oligoastrocitoma es un tumor de crecimiento lento. El aspecto de las células tumorales es similar al de las células normales. En algunos casos, el oligoastrocitoma se puede curar.
  • Oligoastrocitoma anaplásico (grado III): el oligoastrocitoma anaplásico crece rápido y se disemina a los tejidos cercanos. Las células tumorales tienen un aspecto diferente al de las células normales. Este tipo de tumor tiene un pronóstico peor que el del oligoastrocitoma (grado II).

Tumores ependimarios

Un tumor ependimario habitualmente empieza en las células que revisten los espacios llenos de líquido del cerebro y los que rodean la médula espinal. Los tumores ependimarios también se llaman ependimomas. Los grados de los ependimomas son los siguientes:

  • Ependimoma (grado I o II): un ependimoma de grado I o II crece lentamente y tiene células con aspecto parecido al de las células normales. Hay dos tipos de ependimoma de grado I: ependimoma mixopapilar y subependimoma. Un ependimoma de grado II crece en un ventrículo (espacio lleno de líquido en el cerebro) y sus vías de conexión o en la médula espinal. En algunos casos, un ependimoma de grado I o II se puede curar.
  • Ependimoma anaplásico (grado III): el ependimoma anaplásico crece rápido y se disemina a los tejidos cercanos. Las células tumorales tienen un aspecto diferente al de las células normales. Con frecuencia, este tipo de tumores tiene un pronóstico peor que el ependimoma de grado I y II.

Un meduloblastoma es un tipo de tumor embrionario. Los meduloblastomas son más comunes en los niños y en los adultos jóvenes.

Tumores del parénquima pineal

Un tumor del parénquima pineal se forma en las células del parénquima o pineocitos, que son las células que componen la mayor parte de la glándula pineal. Estos tumores son diferentes de los tumores astrocíticos pineales. Los grados de los tumores del parénquima pineal son los siguientes:

  • Pineocitoma (grado II): un pineocitoma es un tumor pineal de crecimiento lento.
  • Pineoblastoma (grado IV): un pineoblastoma es un tumor poco frecuente que muy probablemente se disemine.

Tumores meníngeos

Un tumor meníngeo, que también se llama meningioma, se forma en las meninges (capas delgadas de tejido que cubren el cerebro y la médula espinal). Puede estar formado por diferentes tipos de células del cerebro y la médula espinal. Los meningiomas son más comunes en los adultos. Los tipos de tumores meníngeos son los siguientes:

  • Meningioma (grado I): un meningioma de grado I es el tipo más común de tumor meníngeo. Un meningioma de grado I es un tumor de crecimiento lento que se forma con más frecuencia en la duramadre. Los meningiomas de grado I se pueden curar si se extirpan por completo por medio de una cirugía.
  • Meningioma (grados II y III): este es un tipo de tumor meníngeo poco frecuente. Crece rápidamente y es probable que se disemine dentro del cerebro y la médula espinal. El pronóstico es peor que el de un meningioma de grado I porque, con frecuencia, el tumor no se puede extirpar por medio de cirugía.

Un hemangiopericitoma no es un tumor meníngeo, pero se trata igual que un meningioma de grados II o III. Un hemangiopericitoma habitualmente se forma en la duramadre. El pronóstico es peor que el de un meningioma porque, con frecuencia, el tumor no se puede extirpar por completo por medio de cirugía.

Tumores de células germinativas

Un tumor de células germinativas se forma en las células germinativas, que son las células que se convierten en espermatozoides en los hombres y en los óvulos (huevos) en las mujeres. Hay distintos tipos de tumores de células germinativas. Estos incluyen los germinomas, los teratomas, los carcinomas del saco vitelino y los coriocarcinomas. Los tumores de células germinativas pueden ser benignos o malignos.

Craneofaringioma (grado I)

Los craneofaringiomas son tumores poco frecuentes que a menudo se forman justo arriba de la hipófisis (un órgano del tamaño de una arveja debajo del cerebro que controla otras glándulas). Los craneofaringiomas se pueden formar a partir de diferentes tipos de células del cerebro o la médula espinal. Estos comienzan en el centro del cerebro, justo encima de la parte de atrás de la nariz.

Tumores cerebrales recidivantes

Un tumor cerebral recidivante es un tumor que recidivó (volvió) después de haber sido tratado. Los tumores cerebrales recidivan a menudo, a veces muchos años después del primer tumor. El tumor puede recidivar en el mismo lugar del cerebro o en otras partes del sistema nervioso central.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta la posibilidad de enfermarse se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a enfermar de cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se va a enfermar de cáncer. Consultar con el médico si piensa que puede estar en riesgo. Hay pocos factores de riesgo conocidos para los tumores cerebrales. Las siguientes afecciones pueden aumentar el riesgo de presentar ciertos tipos de tumores cerebrales:

  • Estar expuesto a cloruro vinílico puede aumentar el riesgo de presentar un glioma.
  • Tener una infección por el virus de Epstein-Barr, tener SIDA (síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida) o recibir un trasplante de órgano puede aumentar el riesgo de presentar un linfoma primario del SNC. (Para mayor información, consultar el sumario del PDQ sobre Linfoma primario del sistema nervioso central).
  • Tener ciertos síndromes genéticos puede aumentar el riesgo de presentar tumores cerebrales:
    • Neurofibromatosis tipos 1 (NF1) o 2 (NF2).
    • Enfermedad de von Hippel-Lindau.
    • Esclerosis tuberosa.
    • Síndrome de Li-Fraumeni.
    • Síndrome de Turcot tipos 1 o 2.
    • Síndrome de carcinoma nevoide de células basales.

Se desconoce la causa de la mayoría de tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Los síntomas de los tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal no son los mismos para cada persona. Los síntomas que causa un tumor cerebral primario dependen del lugar del cerebro donde comienza, lo que controla esa parte del cerebro y el tamaño del tumor. Los dolores de cabeza y otros síntomas pueden obedecer a tumores cerebrales. Otras afecciones, como el cáncer que se diseminó al cerebro, pueden producir los mismos síntomas. Consultar con el médico si tiene alguno de los problemas siguientes:

Tumores cerebrales

  • Dolor de cabeza en las mañanas o dolor de cabeza que desaparece después de vomitar.
  • Náuseas y vómitos frecuentes.
  • Pérdida de apetito.
  • Problemas de la vista, el oído o el habla.
  • Pérdida de equilibrio y problemas para caminar.
  • Debilidad.
  • Somnolencia no habitual o cambio en el grado de actividad.
  • Cambios de personalidad, humor, comportamiento o en la capacidad de concentrarse.
  • Crisis epilépticas.

Tumores de la médula espinal

  • Dolor de espalda o dolor que va desde la espalda hacia los brazos o las piernas.
  • Cambio en los hábitos intestinales o problemas para orinar.
  • Debilidad en las piernas.
  • Problemas para caminar.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Hay pruebas que examinan el cerebro y la médula espinal para diagnosticar tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal en adultos.

Se pueden usar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para chequear los signos generales de salud, incluso verificar si hay signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se toman los antecedentes de los hábitos de salud del paciente, así como los antecedentes médicos de sus enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores.
  • Examen neurológico: serie de preguntas y pruebas para chequear el cerebro, la médula espinal y el funcionamiento de los nervios. El examen verifica el estado mental de la persona, la coordinación y la capacidad de caminar normalmente, así como el funcionamiento de los músculos, los sentidos y los reflejos.
  • Examen del campo visual: examen para comprobar campo visual de una persona de visión (el área total en la que se pueden ver objetos). Esta prueba mide tanto la visión central (cuánto puede ver una persona cuando mira fijamente hacia adelante) como la visión periférica (cuánto una persona puede ver en todas las otras direcciones cuando mira fijamente hacia adelante). Cualquier pérdida de la vista puede ser un signo de un tumor que dañó o presionó partes del cerebro que afectan la vista.
  • Prueba de marcadores tumorales: procedimiento mediante el que se examina una muestra de sangre, orina o tejido para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias elaboradas por los órganos, los tejidos o las células tumorales del cuerpo. Ciertas sustancias se relacionan con tipos específicos de cáncer cuando se encuentran en concentraciones muy altas en el cuerpo. Estas sustancias se llaman marcadores tumorales. Esta prueba se puede realizar para diagnosticar un tumor de células germinativas.
  • Prueba genética: prueba de laboratorio en la que se estudia una muestra de sangre o de tejido para determinar si hay cambios en un cromosoma que se relaciona con cierto tipo de tumor cerebral. Esta prueba se puede realizar para diagnosticar un síndrome hereditario.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. De forma opcional, se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética) con gadolinio: procedimiento para el que se utiliza un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas del cerebro y la médula espinal. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia que se llama gadolinio. El gadolinio se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas y las hace aparecer más brillantes en la imagen. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN). A veces, se realiza un procedimiento que se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética espectroscópica (IRME) durante la exploración por IRM. Las IRME se usan para diagnosticar tumores con base en su constitución química. Las IRM se usan a menudo para diagnosticar tumores en la médula espinal.
  • Exploración por TCEFU (tomografía computarizada por emisión de fotón único): procedimiento para el que se usa una cámara especial conectada con una computadora para obtener una imagen tridimensional (3-D) del cerebro. Se inyecta una pequeña cantidad de una sustancia radiactiva en una vena o se inhala por la nariz. A medida que la sustancia se desplaza por la sangre, la cámara rota alrededor de la cabeza y toma imágenes del cerebro. El flujo de la sangre y el metabolismo son más altos de lo normal en las áreas donde hay células cancerosas que crecen. Esas áreas se ven más brillantes en la imagen. Este procedimiento se puede realizar inmediatamente antes o después de una exploración por TC. La TCEFU se usa para determinar la diferencia entre un tumor primario y un tumor que se diseminó al cerebro desde otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células tumorales malignas en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El explorador TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cerebro que absorben la glucosa. Las células tumorales malignas tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales. La TEP se usa para diferenciar entre un tumor primario y un tumor que se diseminó al cerebro desde otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Angiograma: procedimiento que se usa para observar los vasos sanguíneos y el flujo de la sangre en el cerebro. Se inyecta un tinte de contraste en el vaso sanguíneo. A medida en que el tinte de contraste se desplaza por el vaso sanguíneo, se toman radiografías para ver si este se obstruye.

También se realiza una biopsia para diagnosticar un tumor cerebral. Si las pruebas con imágenes muestran que puede haber tumor cerebral, a menudo se realiza una biopsia. Se puede realizar uno de los siguientes tipos de biopsia:

  • Biopsia estereotáctica: cuando las pruebas con imágenes muestran que puede haber un tumor profundo en el cerebro en un lugar difícil de alcanzar, se puede realizar una biopsia estereotáctica del cerebro. Para este tipo de biopsia se usa una computadora y un aparato explorador tridimensional para encontrar el tumor y guiar la aguja que se usa para extraer el tejido. Se hace una incisión pequeña en el cuero cabelludo y se abre un agujero pequeño a través del cráneo. Se inserta una aguja para biopsia a través del agujero a fin de extraer células o tejidos para que un patólogo los observe al microscopio y determine si hay signos de cáncer.
  • Biopsia abierta: cuando las pruebas con imágenes muestran que hay un tumor que se pueden extirpar por medio de cirugía, se puede realizar una biopsia abierta. Se extrae una parte del cráneo en una operación que se llama craneotomía. Se extrae una muestra de tejido cerebral y un patólogo lo observa al microscopio. Si se encuentran células cancerosas, se puede remover todo o parte del tumor durante la misma cirugía. Hay pruebas que se realizan antes de la cirugía para encontrar las áreas alrededor del tumor que son importantes para el funcionamiento normal del cerebro. También hay formas de examinar el funcionamiento del cerebro durante la cirugía. El médico usará los resultados de estas pruebas para extirpar la mayor cantidad de tumor posible con el menor daño al tejido normal del cerebro.

ctt line break

Estadificación

No hay un sistema estándar de estadificación para los tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal en adultos.

El grado o la diseminación del cáncer habitualmente se describen en términos de estadios. No hay un sistema de estadificación estándar para los tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal. Los tumores cerebrales que comienzan en el cerebro se pueden diseminar hasta otras partes del cerebro y la médula espinal, pero no se suelen diseminar hasta otras partes del cuerpo. El tratamiento de los tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal se basa en los siguientes aspectos:

  • Tipo de célula en la que comenzó el tumor.
  • Lugar en que se formó el tumor en el cerebro o la médula espinal.
  • Cantidad de cáncer que queda después de la cirugía.
  • Grado del tumor.

El tratamiento de los tumores cerebrales que se diseminaron al cerebro desde otras partes del cuerpo se basa en la cantidad de tumores en el cerebro.

Las pruebas de imaginología se pueden repetir después de la cirugía para ayudar a planificar tratamiento adicional. Algunos de las pruebas y procedimientos que se usan para diagnosticar un tumor cerebral o de la médula espinal se pueden repetir después del tratamiento para determinar la cantidad de tumor que todavía queda.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamientos para los pacientes de tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal en adultos.

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes adultos de tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente en uso) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento consiste en un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan cuatro tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Espera cautelosa
  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Espera cautelosa

La espera cautelosa es la vigilancia estrecha de la condición de un paciente sin administrar ningún tratamiento hasta que los síntomas se presenten o cambien.

Cirugía

La cirugía se puede usar para diagnosticar y tratar los tumores cerebrales y de la médula espinal en adultos. Consultar la sección Información general de este sumario.

Incluso si el médico extirpa todo el cáncer que se puede ver en el momento de la cirugía, algunos pacientes pueden recibir quimioterapia o radioterapia después de la cirugía para destruir cualquier célula cancerosa que quede. El tratamiento que se administra después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa usa una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía radiación al área donde se encuentra el cáncer. La radioterapia interna usa una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente dentro del cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo y el lugar del cerebro o de la médula espinal donde está el tumor.

Las siguientes formas de administrar radioterapia al tumor causan menos daño al tejido sano cercano:

  • Radioterapia conformal tridimensional: procedimiento en el que se usa una computadora para crear una imagen tridimensional (3-D) del tumor cerebral o de la médula espinal. Esto permite que los médicos administren la dosis más alta posible de radiación al tumor, con el menor daño al tejido normal como sea posible. Este tipo de radioterapia también se llama radioterapia tridimensional o RCT-3D.
  • Radioterapia de intensidad modulada (RIM): tipo de radioterapia 3D en la que se usa una computadora para tomar imágenes del tamaño y la forma del tumor cerebral o de la médula espinal. Se administran rayos finos de radiación de varias intensidades (fuerzas) al tumor desde diferentes ángulos. Este tipo de radioterapia produce menos daño al tejido sano cercano al tumor.
  • Radiocirugía estereotáctica: tipo de radioterapia en la que se usa un marco en la cabeza unido al cráneo para administrar una sola dosis alta de radiación directamente al tumor cerebral. Esto causa menos daño al tejido sano cercano. La radiocirugía estereotáctica también se llama radiocirugía estereotáxica, radiocirugía y cirugía de radiación. Este procedimiento no incluye cirugía.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de las células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra por boca o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La quimioterapia de combinación es un tratamiento en el que se usa más de un medicamento contra el cáncer. Para tratar los tumores cerebrales, se puede usar una oblea Gliadel que se disuelve para enviar el medicamento contra el cáncer directamente al sitio del tumor cerebral después que se extirpó el tumor mediante cirugía. La forma en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el lugar del cerebro donde está el tumor.

Los medicamentos contra el cáncer que se administran por boca o por medio de una vena para tratar los tumores del cerebro y de la médula espinal no pueden cruzar la barrera hematoencefálica y entrar en el líquido que rodea el cerebro y la médula espinal. En su lugar, se inyecta un medicamento contra el cáncer en el espacio lleno de líquido a fin de eliminar las células cancerosas que se encuentran ahí. Esto se llama quimioterapia intratecal.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información en inglés sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Radioterapia con haz de protón: La radioterapia con haz de protón es un tipo de radioterapia externa de alta energía que usa corrientes de protones (pedazos pequeños de materia con carga positiva) para crear radiación. Este tipo de radiación elimina las células tumorales con poco daño a los tejidos cercanos y se usa para tratar el cáncer de cabeza, cuello y espina vertebral, y órganos como el cerebro, los ojos, los pulmones y la próstata. La radioterapia con haz de protón es diferente de la radiación con rayos x.

Terapia biológica: La terapia biológica es un tratamiento para el que se usa el sistema inmunitario del paciente para combatir el cáncer. Se usan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o producidas en el laboratorio para impulsar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra el cáncer. Este tipo de tratamiento del cáncer también se llama bioterapia o inmunoterapia.

La terapia biológica está en estudio para el tratamiento de algunos tipos de tumores cerebrales. Dentro de los tratamientos se incluyen los siguientes:

  • Terapia con el inhibidor de la tirosina cinasa.
  • Terapia con el factor de crecimiento endotelial vascular (FCEV).
  • Terapia con la vacuna de células dendríticas.
  • Terapia génica.

Terapia dirigida: La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento que usa medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales.

Hay cuidados de apoyo que se ofrecen para disminuir los problemas que causa la enfermedad y su tratamiento.

Esta terapia controla los problemas o los efectos secundarios que causa la enfermedad o su tratamiento y mejora la calidad de vida. Los cuidados de apoyo para los tumores cerebrales incluyen medicamentos para controlar las crisis epilépticas y la acumulación de líquidos o hinchazón en el cerebro.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Robert Bollo, M.D., M.S.

Locations
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5340

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Endoscopic Surgery, Epilepsy Surgery, Hydrocephalus, Neuro Spine Surgery, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Spinal Cord Tumors, Traumatic Brain Injury

Douglas L. Brockmeyer, M.D., F.A.A.P.

Locations
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5340

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Neurosurgery, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Skull Base Surgery, Trauma - Neuro Critical Care

Adam L. Cohen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4269
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-0260

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Neuro-Oncology, Oncology, Spinal Cord Tumors

Howard Colman, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0260

Specialties: Brain Tumors, General Neurology, Neuro-Oncology, Neurosurgery, Spinal Cord Tumors

William T. Couldwell, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Clinical Neurosciences Center (801) 585-6065

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Neurosurgery, Neurovascular Surgery, Skull Base Surgery, Stroke, Trauma - Neuro Critical Care

Randy L. Jensen, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Clinical Neurosciences Center (801) 585-6065
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-0260

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Neurosurgery, Skull Base Surgery, Trauma - Neuro Critical Care

John R. Kestle, M.D.

Locations
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5340

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Neurosurgery, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Trauma - Neuro Critical Care

Michael Allen Pulsipher, B.A., M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0100
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-4700
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-4830

Specialties: Benign Hematology, Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Brain Tumors, Hematology/BMT, Leukemia, Lymphomas, Neuroblastoma, Pediatric Hematology & Oncology

Meic H. Schmidt, M.D., M.B.A.

Locations
Clinical Neurosciences Center (801) 585-6065
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0262

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Endoscopic Surgery, Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, Neuro Spine Surgery, Neuro-Oncology, Neurosurgery, Radiosurgery, Spinal Cord Tumors, Trauma - Neuro Critical Care

Dennis C. Shrieve, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Genitourinary Cancers, Lung Cancer, Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Prostate Cancer, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Phil Taussky, M.D.

Locations
Clinical Neurosciences Center (801) 581-6908

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Cerebral Aneurysms, Hydrocephalus, Neurointerventional Radiology, Neurosurgery, Neurovascular Surgery, Skull Base Surgery, Stroke, Trauma - Neuro Critical Care, Traumatic Brain Injury, Vascular Malformations

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Pediatric Diseases and Conditions
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

Tammie ReynoldsBrain, Spine, and Skull Base Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Tammie Reynolds
Phone: 801-585-0260
Fax: 801-585-3846
E-mail: tammie.reynolds@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Brain tumors are more common in males, except for meningiomas, which are more common in females.
  • Lung cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, melanoma, and other types of cancer often spread to the brain. When this happens, the tumors are called metastatic brain tumors or brain metastases.
  • The Brain, Spine, and Skull Base Cancer Program at Huntsman Cancer Institute provides each patient with state-of-the-art medical, surgical, and radiation care. Patients are guided through the process of diagnosis, treatment, and social services to ensure individual needs are met.
clc graphic right column