Breast Cancer

breast anatomyBreast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the breast.

The breast is made up of lobes and ducts. Each breast has 15 to 20 sections called lobes, which have many smaller sections called lobules. Lobules end in dozens of tiny bulbs that can make milk. The lobes, lobules, and bulbs are linked by thin tubes called ducts.

Each breast also has blood vessels and lymph vessels. The lymph vessels carry an almost colorless fluid called lymph. Lymph vessels lead to organs called lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small bean-shaped structures that are found throughout the body. They filter substances in a fluid called lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast in the axilla (under the arm), above the collarbone, and in the chest.

The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which begins in the cells of the ducts. Cancer that begins in the lobes or lobules is called lobular carcinoma and is more often found in both breasts than are other types of breast cancer.

Inflammatory breast cancer is an uncommon type of breast cancer in which the breast is warm, red, and swollen. The redness and warmth occur because the cancer cells block the lymph vessels in the skin. The skin of the breast may also look dimpled like the skin of an orange.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

 

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for breast cancer include the following:

  • Menstruating at an early age.
  • Older age at first birth or never having given birth.
  • A personal history of invasive breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), or benign (noncancer) breast disease.
  • A family history (first-degree relative, such as mother, daughter, or sister) of breast cancer.  Learn more about hereditary cancer risk from our Family Cancer Assessment Clinic.
  • Having inherited changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
  • Treatment with radiation therapy to the breast/chest.
  • Having breast tissue that is dense on a mammogram.
  • Taking hormones such as estrogen and progesterone for symptoms of menopause.
  • Having taken the hormone diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy or being the daughter of a woman who took DES while pregnant.
  • Obesity.
  • Not getting enough exercise.
  • Drinking alcoholic beverages.
  • Being white.

Breast cancer is sometimes caused by inherited gene mutations (changes). The genes in cells carry the hereditary information that is received from a person’s parents. Hereditary breast cancer makes up about 5% to 10% of all breast cancer. Some mutated genes related to breast cancer are more common in certain ethnic groups.

Women who have certain gene mutations, such as a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, have an increased risk of breast cancer. Also, women who have had breast cancer in one breast have an increased risk of developing breast cancer in the other breast. These women also have an increased risk of ovarian cancer, and may have an increased risk of other cancers. Men who have a mutated gene related to breast cancer also have an increased risk of this disease.

There are tests that can detect (find) mutated genes. Learn about genetic testing from our Family Cancer Assessment Clinic.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Breast cancer may cause any of the following signs and symptoms. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • A lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm area.
  • A change in the size or shape of the breast.
  • A dimple or puckering in the skin of the breast.
  • A nipple turned inward into the breast.
  • Fluid, other than breast milk, from the nipple, especially if it's bloody.
  • Scaly, red, or swollen skin on the breast, nipple, or areola (the dark area of skin that is around the nipple).
  • Dimples in the breast that look like the skin of an orange.

Other conditions that are not breast cancer may cause these same symptoms. View these factsheets for more information:

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

To schedule a mammogram at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) call 801-581-5496. To learn more, view the following resources:

Tests that examine the breasts are used to detect (find) and diagnose breast cancer. A doctor should be seen if changes in the breast are noticed. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Clinical breast exam (CBE): An exam of the breast by a doctor or other health professional. The doctor will carefully feel the breasts and under the arms for lumps or anything else that seems unusual.
  • Mammogram: An x-ray of the breast. Learn more about this procedure and what to expect during a mammogram.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. The picture can be printed to be looked at later.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Blood chemistry studies: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. An unusual (higher or lower than normal) amount of a substance can be a sign of disease in the organ or tissue that makes it.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. If a lump in the breast is found, the doctor may need to remove a small piece of the lump. Four types of biopsies are as follows:
    • Excisional biopsy: The removal of an entire lump of tissue.
    • Incisional biopsy: The removal of part of a lump or a sample of tissue.
    • Core biopsy: The removal of tissue using a wide needle.
    • Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy: The removal of tissue or fluid, using a thin needle.

If cancer is found, tests are done to study the cancer cells. Decisions about the best treatment are based on the results of these tests. The tests give information about:

  • how quickly the cancer may grow.
  • how likely it is that the cancer will spread through the body.
  • how well certain treatments might work.
  • how likely the cancer is to recur (come back).

Tests include the following:

  • Estrogen and progesterone receptor test: A test to measure the amount of estrogen and progesterone (hormones) receptors in cancer tissue. If there are more estrogen and progesterone receptors than normal, the cancer may grow more quickly. The test results show whether treatment to block estrogen and progesterone may stop the cancer from growing.
  • Human epidermal growth factor type 2 receptor (HER2/neu) test: A laboratory test to measure how many HER2/neu genes there are and how much HER2/neu protein is made in a sample of tissue. If there are more HER2/neu genes or higher levels of HER2/neu protein than normal, the cancer may grow more quickly and is more likely to spread to other parts of the body. The cancer may be treated with drugs that target the HER2/neu protein, such as trastuzumab and lapatinib.
  • Multigene tests: Tests in which samples of tissue are studied to look at the activity of many genes at the same time. These tests may help predict whether cancer will spread to other parts of the body or recur (come back).
    • Oncotype DX: This test helps predict whether stage I or stage II breast cancer that is estrogen receptor positive and node-negative will spread to other parts of the body. If the risk of the cancer spreading is high, chemotherapy may be given to lower the risk.
    • MammaPrint: This test helps predict whether stage I or stage II breast cancer that is node-negative will spread to other parts of the body. If the risk of the cancer spreading is high, chemotherapy may be given to lower the risk.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After breast cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the breast or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out whether the cancer has spread within the breast or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy: The removal of the sentinel lymph node during surgery. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a tumor. It is the first lymph node the cancer is likely to spread to from the tumor. A radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through the lymph ducts to the lymph nodes. The first lymph node to receive the substance or dye is removed. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells. If cancer cells are not found, it may not be necessary to remove more lymph nodes.
  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Bone scan: A procedure to check if there are rapidly dividing cells, such as cancer cells, in the bone. A very small amount of radioactive material is injected into a vein and travels through the bloodstream. The radioactive material collects in the bones and is detected by a scanner.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if breast cancer spreads to the bone, the cancer cells in the bone are actually breast cancer cells. The disease is metastatic breast cancer, not bone cancer.

The following stages are used for breast cancer:

Stage 0 (carcinoma in situ)

There are 3 types of breast carcinoma in situ:

  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lining of a breast duct. The abnormal cells have not spread outside the duct to other tissues in the breast. In some cases, DCIS may become invasive cancer and spread to other tissues. At this time, there is no way to know which lesions could become invasive.
  • Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is a condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lobules of the breast. This condition seldom becomes invasive cancer. However, having LCIS in one breast increases the risk of developing breast cancer in either breast.
  • Paget disease of the nipple is a condition in which abnormal cells are found in the nipple only.

Stage I

In stage I, cancer has formed. Stage I is divided into stages IA and IB.

  • In stage IA, the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Cancer has not spread outside the breast.
  • In stage IB, small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes and either:
    • no tumor is found in the breast; or
    • the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller.

Stage II

Stage II is divided into stages IIA and IIB.

  • In stage IIA:
    • no tumor is found in the breast or the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Cancer (larger than 2 millimeters) is found in 1 to 3 axillary lymph nodes or in the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during a sentinel lymph node biopsy); or
    • the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes.
  • In stage IIB, the tumor is:
    • larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes; or
    • larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has spread to 1 to 3 axillary lymph nodes or to the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during a sentinel lymph node biopsy); or
    • larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes.

Stage III

In stage IIIA:

  • no tumor is found in the breast or the tumor may be any size. Cancer is found in 4 to 9 axillary lymph nodes or in the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during imaging tests or a physical exam); or
  • the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes; or
  • the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has spread to 1 to 3 axillary lymph nodes or to the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during a sentinel lymph node biopsy).

In stage IIIB, the tumor may be any size and cancer has spread to the chest wall and/or to the skin of the breast and caused swelling or an ulcer. Also, cancer may have spread to:

  • up to 9 axillary lymph nodes; or
  • the lymph nodes near the breastbone.

Cancer that has spread to the skin of the breast may also be inflammatory breast cancer.

In stage IIIC, no tumor is found in the breast or the tumor may be any size. Cancer may have spread to the skin of the breast and caused swelling or an ulcer and/or has spread to the chest wall. Also, cancer has spread to:

  • 10 or more axillary lymph nodes; or
  • lymph nodes above or below the collarbone; or
  • axillary lymph nodes and lymph nodes near the breastbone.

Cancer that has spread to the skin of the breast may also be inflammatory breast cancer.

For treatment, stage IIIC breast cancer is divided into operable and inoperable stage IIIC.

Stage IV

In stage IV, cancer has spread to other organs of the body, most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, breast cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with breast cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Six types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Learn about surgery options in our video about breast cancer surgery.

 

Most patients with breast cancer have surgery to remove the cancer from the breast. Some of the lymph nodes under the arm are usually taken out and looked at under a microscope to see if they contain cancer cells.

Breast-conserving surgery, an operation to remove the cancer but not the breast itself, includes the following:

  • Lumpectomy: Surgery to remove a tumor (lump) and a small amount of normal tissue around it.
  • Partial mastectomy: Surgery to remove the part of the breast that has cancer and some normal tissue around it. The lining over the chest muscles below the cancer may also be removed. This procedure is also called a segmental mastectomy.

Patients who are treated with breast-conserving surgery may also have some of the lymph nodes under the arm removed for biopsy. This procedure is called lymph node dissection. It may be done at the same time as the breast-conserving surgery or after. Lymph node dissection is done through a separate incision.

Other types of surgery include the following:

  • Total mastectomy: Surgery to remove the whole breast that has cancer. This procedure is also called a simple mastectomy. Some of the lymph nodes under the arm may be removed for biopsy at the same time as the breast surgery or after. This is done through a separate incision.
  • Modified radical mastectomy: Surgery to remove the whole breast that has cancer, many of the lymph nodes under the arm, the lining over the chest muscles, and
    sometimes, part of the chest wall muscles.

Chemotherapy may be given before surgery to remove the tumor. When given before surgery, chemotherapy will shrink the tumor and reduce the amount of tissue that needs to be removed during surgery. Treatment given before surgery is called neoadjuvant therapy.

Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after the surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

If a patient is going to have a mastectomy, breast reconstruction (surgery to rebuild a breast’s shape after a mastectomy) may be considered. Breast reconstruction may be done at the time of the mastectomy or at a future time. Learn more in our video about breast reconstruction after surgery.

Sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by surgery

Sentinel lymph node biopsy is the removal of the sentinel lymph node during surgery. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a tumor. It is the first lymph node the cancer is likely to spread to from the tumor. A radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through the lymph ducts to the lymph nodes. The first lymph node to receive the substance or dye is removed. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells. If cancer cells are not found, it may not be necessary to remove more lymph nodes. After the sentinel lymph node biopsy, the surgeon removes the tumor (breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy).

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal
fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Hormone therapy

Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment that removes hormones or blocks their action and stops cancer cells from growing. Hormones are substances made by glands in the body and circulated in the bloodstream. Some hormones can cause certain cancers to grow. If tests show that the cancer cells have places where hormones can attach (receptors), drugs, surgery, or radiation therapy is used to reduce the production of hormones or block them from working. The hormone estrogen, which makes some breast cancers grow, is made mainly by the ovaries. Treatment to stop the ovaries from making estrogen is called ovarian ablation.

Hormone therapy with tamoxifen is often given to patients with early stages of breast cancer and those with metastatic breast cancer (cancer that has spread to other parts of the body). Hormone therapy with tamoxifen or estrogens can act on cells all over the body and may increase the chance of developing endometrial cancer. Women taking tamoxifen should have a pelvic exam every year to look for any signs of cancer. Any vaginal bleeding, other than menstrual bleeding, should be reported to a doctor as soon as possible.

Hormone therapy with an aromatase inhibitor is given to some postmenopausal women who have hormone-dependent breast cancer. Hormone-dependent breast cancer needs the hormone estrogen to grow. Aromatase inhibitors decrease the body's estrogen by blocking an enzyme called aromatase from turning androgen into estrogen.

For the treatment of early stage breast cancer, certain aromatase inhibitors may be used as adjuvant therapy instead of tamoxifen or after 2 or more years of tamoxifen. For the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, aromatase inhibitors are being tested in clinical trials to compare them to hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are two types of targeted therapies used in the treatment of breast cancer. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy being studied for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.

Monoclonal antibody therapy is a cancer treatment that uses antibodies made in the laboratory, from a single type of immune system cell. These antibodies can identify substances on cancer cells or normal substances that may help cancer cells grow. The antibodies attach to the substances and kill the cancer cells, block their growth, or keep them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry drugs, toxins, or radioactive material directly to cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies may be used in combination with chemotherapy as adjuvant therapy.

Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the effects of the growth factor protein HER2, which sends growth signals to breast cancer cells. About one-fourth of patients with breast cancer have tumors that may be treated with trastuzumab combined with chemotherapy.

Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may be combined with trastuzumab and chemotherapy to treat breast cancer. It may be used to treat certain patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has metastasized (spread to other parts of the body).

Ado-trastuzumab emtansine is a monoclonal antibody linked to an anticancer drug. This is called an antibody-drug conjugate. It is used to treat HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body or recurred (come back).

Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are targeted therapy drugs that block signals needed for tumors to grow. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be used with other anticancer drugs as adjuvant therapy.

Lapatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks the effects of the HER2 protein and other proteins inside tumor cells. It may be used with other drugs to treat patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has progressed after treatment with trastuzumab.

PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy that block DNA repair and may cause cancer cells to die. PARP inhibitor therapy is being studied for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.

Clinical trials

This section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. For more information, also visit HCI's clinical trials website.

High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant is a way of giving high doses of chemotherapy and replacing blood-forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood or bone marrow of the patient or a donor and are frozen and stored. After the chemotherapy is completed, the stored stem cells are thawed and given back to the patient through an infusion. These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) the body’s blood cells.

Studies have shown that high-dose chemotherapy followed by stem cell transplant does not work better than standard chemotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer. Doctors have decided that, for now, high-dose chemotherapy should be tested only in clinical trials. Before taking part in such a trial, women should talk with their doctors about the serious side effects, including death, that may be caused by high-dose chemotherapy.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de seno (mama) es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la mama.

La mama está compuesta por lóbulos y conductos. Cada mama tiene entre 15 y 20 secciones que se llaman lobulillos. Los lobulillos terminan en docenas de bulbos minúsculos que pueden producir leche. Los lóbulos, los lobulillos y los bulbos están conectados por tubos delgados que se llaman conductos.

Cada mama tiene también vasos sanguíneos y vasos linfáticos. Los vasos linfáticos transportan un líquido casi incoloro que se llama linfa. Los vasos linfáticos van a órganos que se llaman ganglios linfáticos. Estos son estructuras pequeñas con forma de frijol que se encuentran en todo el cuerpo. Filtran sustancias de un líquido que se llama linfa y ayudan a combatir infecciones y enfermedades. Hay racimos de ganglios linfáticos cerca de la mama en las axilas (debajo de los brazos), por encima de la clavícula y en el pecho.

El tipo más común de cáncer de mama es el carcinoma ductal, que empieza en las células de los conductos. El cáncer que empieza en los lóbulos o los lobulillos se llama carcinoma lobulillar y se encuentra con mayor frecuencia en ambas mamas que otros tipos de cáncer de mama. El cáncer de mama inflamatorio es un tipo de cáncer poco común en el que la mama está caliente, enrojecida e hinchada.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta sus probabilidades de enfermar se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que usted va a tener cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que usted no va a tener cáncer. Consulte con su médico si se piensa que puede estar en riesgo. Los factores de riesgo para el cáncer de mama son los siguientes:

  • Menstruación a edad temprana.
  • Edad avanzada en el momento del primer parto o no haber dado a luz nunca.
  • Antecedentes personales de cáncer de mama invasivo, carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS), carcinoma lobulillar in situ (CLIS) o de enfermedad benigna (no cancerosa) de mama.
  • Antecedentes familiares (familiar de primer grado, como la madre, una hija o una hermana) con cáncer de mama.
  • Cambios hereditarios en los genes BRCA1 o BRCA2 .
  • Tratamiento con radioterapia dirigida a la mama o el pecho.
  • Tejido de la mama que se ve denso en un mamograma.
  • Uso de hormonas, como estrógeno y progesterona para tratar los síntomas de la menopausia.
  • Uso previo de la hormona dietilstilbestrol (DES) durante el embarazo o ser la hija de una mujer que tomó DES durante el embarazo.
  • Obesidad.
  • Actividad física insuficiente.
  • Consumo de bebidas alcohólicas.
  • Raza blanca.

En algunas ocasiones, el cáncer de mama obedece a mutaciones (alteraciones) genéticas heredadas.

Los genes de las células llevan la información hereditaria que cada persona recibe de los padres. El cáncer de mama hereditario representa alrededor de 5 a 10% de todos los casos de cáncer de mama. Algunos genes mutados relacionados con este tipo de cáncer son más comunes en ciertos grupos étnicos.

Las mujeres que presentan ciertas mutaciones genéticas, como la mutación de BRCA1 o BRCA2 tienen un aumento de riesgo de cáncer de mama. Además, las mujeres que tuvieron cáncer en una mama tienen un riesgo más alto de tener cáncer en la otra mama. Estas mujeres también tienen mayor riesgo de cáncer de ovario y pueden tener un mayor riesgo de otros cánceres. Los hombres que tienen una mutación relacionada con el cáncer de mama también tienen un mayor riesgo de esta enfermedad.

Hay pruebas que pueden detectar (encontrar) genes mutados. Estas pruebas genéticas se realizan algunas veces para miembros de familias con un riesgo alto de cáncer.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de mama puede causar cualquiera de los siguientes signos y síntomas. Consulte con su médico si tiene cualquiera de los siguientes problemas:

  • Masa o engrosamiento en la mama o cerca de ella, o en el área debajo del brazo.
  • Cambio en el tamaño o la forma de la mama.
  • Hoyuelo o arruga en la piel de la mama.
  • Pezón que se vuelve hacia adentro de la mama.
  • Líquido que sale del pezón, que no es leche materna; especialmente si es sanguinolento.
  • Piel con escamas, roja o hinchada en la mama, el pezón o la aréola (área oscura de piel que rodea el pezón).
  • Hoyuelos en la mama parecidos a la piel de naranja (se llama piel de naranja).

Otras afecciones que no son cáncer de mama pueden causar los mismos síntomas.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de mama, se utilizan pruebas que examinan las mamas. Se debe consultar con un médico si se observan cambios en la mama. Se pueden usar las siguientes pruebas o procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para revisar los signos generales de salud, incluso verificar si hay signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se anotan los antecedentes de los hábitos de salud del paciente y los antecedentes médicos de sus enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores.
  • Examen clínico de la mama (ECM): examen de la mama realizado por un médico u otro profesional de la salud. El médico palpará cuidadosamente las mamas y el área debajo de los brazos para detectar masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca poco habitual.
  • Mamograma: radiografía de la mama.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento para el que se hacen rebotar ondas de sonido de alta energía (ultrasonido) en los tejidos u órganos internos para producir ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales llamada ecograma. La imagen se puede imprimir para observar más tarde.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Estudios químicos de la sangre: procedimiento por el que se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias que los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo liberan en esta. Una cantidad no habitual (mayor o menor que la normal) de una sustancia puede ser signo de enfermedad en el órgano o el tejido que la elabora.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo las observe al microscopio y verifique si hay signos de cáncer. Si se encuentra un bulto en la mama, el médico puede necesitar extraer una pequeña cantidad del bulto. Los cuatro tipos de biopsias son los siguientes:
    • Biopsia por escisión : extracción completa de una masa de tejido.
    • Biopsia por incisión : extracción de una parte de una masa o de una muestra de tejido.
    • Biopsia central : extracción de tejido con una aguja ancha.
    • Biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina (AAF): extracción de tejido o líquido con una aguja fina.

Si se encuentra cáncer, se llevan a cabo pruebas para estudiar las células cancerosas.

Las decisiones sobre cuál es el mejor tratamiento se toman de acuerdo con el resultado de estas pruebas. Las pruebas proveen información sobre los siguientes aspectos:

  • La rapidez con que puede crecer el cáncer.
  • La probabilidad de que el cáncer se disemine por todo el cuerpo.
  • La eficacia de ciertos tratamientos.
  • La probabilidad de que el cáncer recidive (vuelva).

Las pruebas incluyen los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Prueba de receptores de estrógeno y progesterona: prueba que se usa para medir la cantidad de receptores de estrógeno y progesterona (hormonas) en el tejido canceroso. Si se encuentra más receptores de estrógeno y progesterona de lo normal, el cáncer puede crecer más rápido. Los resultados de las pruebas indican si el tratamiento que impide la acción de estrógeno y progesterona, puede detener el crecimiento del cáncer.
  • Receptor del factor de crecimiento epidérmico humano tipo 2 (HER2/neu): prueba de laboratorio para medir cuántos genes HER2/neu hay y cuánta proteína HER2/neu se elabora en una muestra de tejido. Si hay más genes HER2/neu o concentraciones más elevadas de proteína HER2/neu que lo normal, el cáncer puede crecer más rápido y es más probable que se disemine hasta otras partes del cuerpo. El cáncer se puede tratar con medicamentos dirigidos a la proteína HER2/neu como el trastuzumab y el lapatinib.
  • Pruebas multigénicas: pruebas en las que se estudian muestras de tejidos para observar la actividad de varios genes a la vez. Estas pruebas pueden ayudar a predecir si el cáncer se diseminará hasta otras partes del cuerpo o si recidivará (volverá).
    • Oncotype DX: esta prueba ayuda a predecir si el cáncer de mama en estadio I o el cáncer de mama en estadio II que tienen receptores de estrógeno positivos y ganglios linfáticos negativos se diseminarán hasta otras partes del cuerpo. Si el riesgo de diseminación del cáncer es alto, se puede administrar quimioterapia para reducir el riesgo.
    • MammaPrint: esta prueba ayuda a predecir si un cáncer de mama en estadio I o en estadio II con ganglios negativos, se diseminará hasta otras partes del cuerpo. Si el riesgo de diseminación es alto, se puede administrar quimioterapia para reducir el riesgo.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de que se diagnostica el cáncer de mama, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de esta o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso que se usa para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro de la mama o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información que se obtiene en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio a fin de planificar el tratamiento. Para el proceso de estadificación, se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela: extracción del ganglio linfático centinela durante una cirugía. El ganglio linfático centinela es el primer ganglio linfático que recibe el drenaje linfático de un tumor y es el primer ganglio linfático donde es posible que el cáncer se disemine desde el tumor. Se inyecta una sustancia radiactiva o un tinte azul cerca del tumor. La sustancia o el tinte fluye a través de los conductos linfáticos hasta los ganglios linfáticos. Se extrae el primer ganglio que recibe la sustancia o el tinte. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Cuando no se detectan células cancerosas, puede no ser necesario extraer más ganglios linfáticos.
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y huesos del interior del pecho. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas internas del cuerpo.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el que se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen de forma más clara. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Exploración ósea: procedimiento que se utiliza para verificar si hay células en los huesos que se multiplican rápidamente, como las células cancerosas. Se inyecta una cantidad muy pequeña de material radiactivo en una vena y este recorre todo el torrente sanguíneo. Cuando el material radiactivo se acumula en los huesos, se puede detectar con un escáner.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El explorador por TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de mama se disemina a los huesos, las células cancerosas en los huesos son, en realidad, células de cáncer de mama. La enfermedad es cáncer de mama metastásico, no cáncer de hueso. Para el cáncer de mama se usan los siguientes estadios:

Esta sección describe los estadios del cáncer de mama. Los estadios del cáncer de mama se basan en los resultados de las pruebas que se le hacen al tumor y los ganglios linfáticos que se extirpan durante la cirugía y otras pruebas.

Estadio 0 (carcinoma in situ)

Hay tres tipos de carcinoma de mama in situ:

  • Carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS): es una afección no invasiva en la que se encuentran células anormales en el revestimiento de un conducto de la mama. Las células anómalas no se diseminaron afuera de este conducto hasta otros tejidos de la mama. En algunos casos, el CDIS se puede volver cáncer invasivo y diseminarse hasta otros tejidos. Por el momento no se puede saber cuáles lesiones se volverán invasivas.
  • Carcinoma lobulillar in situ (CLIS): afección en la que se encuentran células anormales en los lobulillos de la mama. Muy raras veces esta afección se vuelve cáncer invasivo. Sin embargo, el presentar CLIS en una mama aumenta el riesgo de presentar cáncer de mama en cualquier mama.
  • La enfermedad de Paget del pezón, es una afección en la que se encuentran células anormales solo en el pezón.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer ya se formó. El estadio I se divide en los estadios IA y IB.

  • En el estadio IA, el tumor mide dos centímetros o menos, y no se diseminó fuera de la mama.
  • En el estadio IB se encuentran pequeños racimos de células de cáncer de mama (mayores de 0,2 milímetros, pero no mayores de dos milímetros) en los ganglios linfáticos y se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones:
    • No se encuentra un tumor en la mama; o
    • El tumor mide dos centímetros o menos

Estadio II

El estadio II se divide en los estadios IIA and IIB.

  • En el estadio IIA:
    • No se encuentra tumor en la mama, o el tumor mide dos centímetros o menos. El cáncer (que mide más de dos milímetros) se encuentra en uno a tres ganglios linfáticos axilares o en los ganglios linfáticos cerca del esternón (se encuentra durante una biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela ); o
    • El tumor mide más de dos centímetros, pero no más de cinco centímetros. El cáncer no se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos.
  • En el estadio IIB, el tumor tiene una de las siguientes características:
    • Mide más de dos centímetros, pero no más de cinco centímetros. Se encuentran pequeños racimos de células de cáncer de mama en los ganglios linfáticos (mayores de 0,2 milímetros pero no mayores de dos milímetros); o
    • Mide más de dos centímetros pero menos de cinco centímetros. El cáncer se diseminó a uno a tres ganglios linfáticos axilares o a los ganglios linfáticos cerca del esternón (se encuentran durante una biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela ); o
    • Mide más de cinco centímetros, pero no se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos.

Estadio III

En el estadio IIIA:

  • No se encuentra tumor en la mama o el tumor puede ser de cualquier tamaño. Se encuentra cáncer en 4 a 9 ganglios linfáticos axilares o en los ganglios linfáticos cerca del esternón (se encuentran durante pruebas con imágenes o un examen físico); o
  • El tumor mide más de cinco centímetros. Se encuentran pequeños racimos de células de cáncer de mama (miden más de 0,2 milímetros pero menos de dos milímetros) en los ganglios linfáticos; o
  • El tumor es mide más de cinco centímetros. El cáncer se diseminó hasta uno a tres ganglios linfáticos axilares o a los ganglios linfáticos cerca del esternón (se encuentran durante una biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela).

En el estadio IIIB, el tumor puede tener cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó hasta a la pared torácica o la piel de la mama y produjo inflamación o úlcera. El cáncer también se puede haber diseminado hasta:

  • No más de nueve ganglios linfáticos axilares; o
  • Los ganglios linfáticos cerca del esternón.

El cáncer que se diseminó hasta la piel de la mama se llama cáncer de mama inflamatorio.

En el estadio IIIC, no se encuentra un tumor en la mama o el tumor puede tener cualquier tamaño. El cáncer se pudo diseminar hasta la piel de la mama y causar inflamación o una úlcera, o se diseminó hasta la pared torácica. El cáncer también se diseminó hasta:

  • Diez o más ganglios linfáticos axilares; o
  • Ganglios linfáticos por encima o debajo de la clavícula; o
  • Ganglios linfáticos axilares y ganglios linfáticos cerca del esternón.

El cáncer que se diseminó hasta la piel de la mama puede ser cáncer de mama inflamatorio.

Para fines de tratamiento el cáncer de mama en estadio lllC se divide en operable e inoperable.

Estadio IV

En el estadio IV, el cáncer se diseminó hasta otros órganos del cuerpo, con mayor frecuencia hasta los huesos, los pulmones, el hígado o el cerebro.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tratamientos disponibles para las pacientes de cáncer de mama. Algunos son estándar (el tratamiento que se usa actualmente) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de tratamientos es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un nuevo tratamiento es mejor que el estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el estándar. Los pacientes deberían considerar participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan seis tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Biopsia del ganglio linfático centinela seguida de cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia
  • Terapia con hormonas
  • Terapia dirigida

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La mayoría de las pacientes de cáncer de mama se someten a cirugía a fin de extirpar el cáncer de la mama. Habitualmente se extirpan algunos de los ganglios linfáticos de abajo del brazo y se observan al microscopio para verificar si contienen células cancerosas.

Cirugía para conservar la mama: operación para extirpar el cáncer, pero no la mama. Incluye los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Lumpectomía: cirugía para extirpar el tumor (masa) y una pequeña cantidad de tejido normal alrededor de este.
  • Mastectomía parcial: cirugía para extirpar la parte de la mama que tiene cáncer y algo del tejido normal que la rodea. También se puede extirpar el revestimiento de los músculos pectorales debajo del cáncer. Este procedimiento también se llama mastectomía segmentaria.

A las pacientes tratadas con cirugía para conservar la mama, también se les puede extirpar algunos de ganglios linfáticos debajo del brazo para someterlos a una biopsia. Este procedimiento se llama disección de ganglios linfáticos. Se puede realizar al mismo tiempo o después de la cirugía para conservar la mama. La disección de ganglios linfáticos se realiza a través de una incisión separada.

  • Otros tipos de cirugía incluyen los siguientes procedimientos:

    • Mastectomía total: cirugía para extirpar toda la mama que tiene cáncer. Este procedimiento también se llama mastectomía simple. Se pueden extraer algunos de los ganglios linfáticos de abajo del brazo para someterlos a una biopsia en el mismo momento de la cirugía o después de esta. Esto se realiza a través de una incisión separada.
    • Mastectomía radical modificada: cirugía para extirpar toda la mama que contiene cáncer, muchos de los ganglios linfáticos de abajo del brazo, el revestimiento de los músculos pectorales y, a veces, parte de los músculos de la pared torácica.

Se puede administrar quimioterapia antes de la cirugía para extirpar el tumor. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra antes de la cirugía, reducirá el tamaño del tumor y la cantidad de tejido que es necesario extirpar durante la cirugía. El tratamiento administrado antes de la cirugía se llama terapia neoadyuvante.

Incluso si el médico extirpa todo el cáncer que se puede ver en el momento de la cirugía, algunas pacientes pueden recibir radioterapia, quimioterapia o terapia con hormonas después de la cirugía para destruir cualquier célula cancerosa que haya quedado. El tratamiento administrado después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Si la paciente se va a someter a una mastectomía, se puede considerar la reconstrucción de la mama (cirugía para reconstruir la forma de una mama después de una mastectomía). La reconstrucción de mama se puede hacer en el momento de la mastectomía o después. La reconstrucción se puede llevar a cabo con tejido de la paciente (no de la mama) o mediante implantes rellenos con una solución salina o un gel de silicona.

La biopsia del ganglio linfático centinela es la extracción del ganglio linfático centinela durante una cirugía. Este es el primer ganglio que recibe el drenaje linfático de un tumor. El ganglio linfático centinela es el primer ganglio linfático donde es posible que el cáncer se disemine desde el tumor. Se inyecta una sustancia radiactiva o un tinte azul cerca del tumor. La sustancia o el tinte fluyen a través de los conductos linfáticos hasta los ganglios linfáticos. Se extrae el primer ganglio que recibe la sustancia o el tinte. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Cuando no se detectan células cancerosas, puede no ser necesario extraer más ganglios linfáticos. Después de la biopsia del ganglio linfático centinela, el cirujano extirpa el tumor (cirugía para conservar la mama o mastectomía).

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa usa una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía radiación al área donde se encuentra el cáncer. La radioterapia interna usa una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente dentro del tumor o cerca de este. La forma en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de las células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra por boca o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y afectan a células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La forma en que se administre la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Terapia con hormonas

La terapia con hormonas es un tratamiento para el cáncer por el que se extraen las hormonas o se bloquea su acción, y se impide el crecimiento de las células cancerosas. Las hormonas son sustancias elaboradas por las glándulas del cuerpo que circulan por el torrente sanguíneo. Algunas hormonas pueden hacer crecer ciertos cánceres. Si las pruebas muestran que las células cancerosas ofrecen sitios donde pueden adherirse las hormonas (receptores), se utilizan medicamentos, cirugía o radioterapia para reducir su producción o impedir que funcionen. La hormona estrógeno, que hace crecer algunos cánceres de mama, es elaborada en su mayor parte por los ovarios. El tratamiento para impedir que los ovarios elaboren estrógeno se llama ablación ovárica.

La terapia con hormonas con tamoxifeno a menudo se suministra a pacientes con estadios tempranos de cáncer de mama y a pacientes de cáncer metastásico de mama (cáncer que se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo). La terapia con hormonas con tamoxifeno o estrógenos puede actuar sobre las células de todo el cuerpo y puede aumentar la probabilidad de presentar cáncer de endometrio. Las mujeres que toman tamoxifeno se deben someter a un examen pélvico todos los años para verificar si hay signos de cáncer. Cualquier sangrado vaginal que no sea sangrado menstrual se debe comunicar a un médico tan pronto como sea posible.

La terapia con hormonas con un inhibidor de la aromatasa se administra a algunas mujeres posmenopáusicas que presentan de cáncer de mama hormonodependiente. El cáncer de mama hormonodependiente necesita de la hormona estrógeno para crecer. Los inhibidores de la aromatasa disminuyen el estrógeno en el cuerpo porque impiden que una enzima que se llama aromatasa convierta el andrógeno en estrógeno.

Ciertos inhibidores de la aromatasa se pueden usar para el tratamiento de cáncer de mama en estadio temprano como terapia adyuvante o después de dos años o más de tamoxifeno. Los inhibidores de la aromatasa se prueban en ensayos clínicos para compararlos con la terapia con hormonas con tamoxifeno para el tratamiento del cáncer de mama metastásico.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento en el que se utilizan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales. Los anticuerpos monoclonales y los inhibidores de la tirosina cinasa son dos tipos de terapia dirigida que se usan para el tratamiento del cáncer de mama. Los inhibidores de PARP son un tipo de sustancias que se usan en la terapia dirigida que están en estudio para el tratamiento del cáncer de mama triple negativo.

La terapia con anticuerpos monoclonales es un tratamiento contra el cáncer para el que se utilizan anticuerpos producidos en el laboratorio a partir de un tipo único de células del sistema inmunitario. Estos anticuerpos pueden identificar sustancias en células cancerosas o sustancias normales en el cuerpo que contribuyen al crecimiento de las células cancerosas. Los anticuerpos se adhieren a las sustancias y eliminan las células cancerosas, impiden su crecimiento o impiden que se diseminen. Los anticuerpos monoclonales se administran por infusión. Se pueden utilizar solos o para administrar medicamentos, toxinas o material directamente hasta las células cancerosas. Los anticuerpos monoclonales se pueden usar en combinación con la quimioterapia como terapia adyuvante.

El trastuzumab es un anticuerpo monoclonal que bloquea los efectos de la proteína del factor de crecimiento HER2, que envía señales a las células cancerosas de la mama. Alrededor de una cuarta parte de las pacientes de cáncer de mama tienen tumores que se pueden tratar con trastuzumab combinado con quimioterapia.

El pertuzumab es un anticuerpo monoclonal que se puede combinar con trastuzumab y quimioterapia para tratar el cáncer de mama. Se puede usar para tratar a pacientes con cáncer de mama positivo al HER2 que hizo metástasis (se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo).

La Ado-trastuzumab emtansina es un anticuerpo monoclonal ligado a un medicamento contra el cáncer. Esto se llama anticuerpo conjugado. Se usa para el tratamiento de cáncer de mama positivo al HER2 que se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo o recidivó (volvió).

Los inhibidores de la tirosina cinasa son medicamentos que se usan en la terapia dirigida para bloquear las señales que los tumores necesitan para crecer. Los inhibidores de la tirosina cinasa se pueden usar con otros medicamentos anticancerosos como terapia adyuvante.

El lapatinib es un inhibidor de la tirosina cinasa que bloquea los efectos de la proteína HER2 y de otras proteínas del interior de las células tumorales. Se puede utilizar con otros medicamentos para tratar a pacientes que tienen cáncer de mama que es positivo para la HER2 y cuyo cáncer evolucionó después del tratamiento con trastuzumab.

Los inhibidores de PARP son un tipo de sustancia que se usa en la terapia dirigida para bloquear la reparación del ADN y podrían destruir las células cancerosas. La terapia con un inhibidor del PARP está en estudio para el tratamiento del cáncer de mama triple negativo.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información en inglés sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Quimioterapia de dosis alta con trasplante de células madre es una forma de administrar dosis altas de quimioterapia y remplazar las células generadoras de sangre destruidas por el tratamiento de cáncer. Las células madre (células sanguíneas inmaduras) se extraen de la sangre o la médula ósea del mismo paciente o un donante, y se congelan y almacenan. Después de finalizar la quimioterapia, las células madre guardadas se descongelan y se reinyectan al paciente mediante una infusión. Estas células madre reinyectadas crecen (y restauran) las células sanguíneas del cuerpo.

Algunos estudios mostraron que con las dosis altas de quimioterapia seguidas de un trasplante de células madre no se obtienen mejores resultados que con la quimioterapia estándar para el tratamiento del cáncer de mama. Los médicos decidieron que, por ahora, las dosis altas de quimioterapia solo se deben probar en los ensayos clínicos. Antes de participar en un estudio de este tipo, las mujeres deben consultar con sus médicos sobre los efectos secundarios graves, incluso la muerte, que pueden causar las dosis altas de quimioterapia.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Chanteel A. Ballard, APRN

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0250

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Nurse Practitioner, Oncology

Anna C. Beck, M.D.

Locations
Eccles Primary Children’s Outpatient Services Building (801) 662-1000
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4246
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 587-4241
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Medical Oncology, Pain Medicine & Palliative Care

Saundra S. Buys, M.D.

Locations
Eccles Primary Children’s Outpatient Services Building (801) 662-1000
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4269
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Oncology

Adam L. Cohen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4269
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-0260

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Neuro-Oncology, Oncology, Spinal Cord Tumors

Rosemary Conder, APRN

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4269

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Family Nurse Practitioner, Oncology

David K. Gaffney, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Lymphomas, Radiation Oncology

Kristine E. Kokeny, M.D.

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Genitourinary Cancers, Lung Cancer, Radiation Oncology

Cindy B. Matsen, M.D.

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Surgery, General

James M. McGreevy, M.D.

Locations
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500
University Hospital (801) 581-4488

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Breast Disease, Breast Surgery, Surgery, General

Edward W. Nelson, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 587-4241
University Hospital (801) 581-7738

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Breast Disease, Breast Surgery, Endocrine, Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Oncology Surgery, Parathyroid, Surgery, General, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery, Women's Health

Matthew M. Poppe, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Jane M. Porretta, M.D., FACS

Locations
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Breast Surgery, Surgery, General

Mark Savarise, M.D.

Locations
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-5026

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Breast Surgery, Colorectal Surgery, Endoscopy, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Sclerotherapy, Spider Veins, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy

Victoria J. Serpico, APRN

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 587-4241

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Breast Disease, Breast Surgery, Family Nurse Practitioner

John H. Ward, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4269

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Oncology

Theresa L. Werner, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0250

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Medical Oncology, Oncology

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Interactive Tools
Videos
Tests and Procedures
Articles
News
Drug Reference
Health Tips

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

coming soonBreast Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Rachel Roller
Phone: 801-587-4241
E-mail: rachel.roller@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Women in the United States get breast cancer more than any other type of cancer except skin cancer.
  • The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA) prevents health insurance companies from denying coverage or adjusting premiums based on genetic information, and also prevents employers from using genetic information to influence hiring, firing, promotion, or salary-related decisions.
  • Although rare, men can develop breast cancer.
clc graphic right column