Cancer Screening and Early Detection

Some types of cancer can be found before they cause symptoms. Checking for cancer (or for conditions that may lead to cancer) in people who have no symptoms is called screening. Screening can help doctors find and treat some types of cancer early. Generally, cancer treatment is more effective when the disease is found early.

It may help to ask your doctor the following questions about screening:

  • Which tests do you recommend for me and why?
  • How much do the tests cost? Will my health insurance help pay for screening tests?
  • Do the tests hurt? Are there any risks?
  • How soon after the tests will I learn the results?
  • If the results show a problem, what is the next step?

Look through these tabs to learn what screenings are recommended for cancers of the breast, colon, skin, lungs, and cervix. If you have questions about screening for cancer in another area of the body, talk with your doctor.

Visit the National Cancer Institute for more information about tests to detect cancer.

 

This provides a brief overview of cancer screening for the general public. People with a family or personal history of cancer, or with concerns about their risk of cancer, should discuss individual cancer screening recommendations with their doctor. 

Breast Cancer Screening

Learn about breast cancer screening options in our Breast Cancer Screening Cardbreast cancer screening card

To schedule a mammogram at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), call 801-581-5496. HCI's Breast Cancer Program provides comprehensive, compassionate, state-of-the-art care. Our mission is to guide each patient through the decision-making process of risk evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment for breast cancer.

Learn more about mammography at HCI in this video.

This provides a brief overview of cancer screening for the general public. People with a family or personal history of cancer, or with concerns about their risk of cancer, should discuss individual cancer screening recommendations with their doctor. 

Colon Cancer Screening

colonoscopy cardLearn how a colonoscopy can help prevent and detect colon cancer in our Prevent Colon Cancer card, or watch the Introduction to Colonoscopy video below.

To schedule a colonoscopy at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), call 801-587-7000. HCI's Gastrointestinal Cancer Program diagnoses and treats all cancers of the digestive system, including cancers of the colon and rectum.

 

 

 

Introduction to Colonoscopy 

 

This provides a brief overview of cancer screening for the general public. People with a family or personal history of cancer, or with concerns about their risk of cancer, should discuss individual cancer screening recommendations with their doctor. 

Skin Cancer and Melanoma

melanoma signs cardSkin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer. There are three main types: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma.

Learn how to protect yourself from skin cancer and the danger signs of melanoma

To schedule a skin exam at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), call 801-581-2955. HCI's Melanoma Cancer Program diagnoses and treats melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancers, and other skin conditions.

 

 

 

This provides a brief overview of cancer screening for the general public. People with a family or personal history of cancer, or with concerns about their risk of cancer, should discuss individual cancer screening recommendations with their doctor. 

Lung Cancer Screening

lung cancer screening brochureLearn about screening tests for lung cancer in our Lung Cancer Screening brochure.

To schedule an appointment at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), call 801-585-0100. HCI's Lung Cancer Program offers consultation, diagnosis, and treatment for cancers of the lungs, chest wall, trachea, and mediastinum. The program’s multidisciplinary team of specialists, including thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, pulmonologists, pathologists, radiation oncologists and radiologists, provides consultations along with diagnostic and therapeutic services.

 

This provides a brief overview of cancer screening for the general public. People with a family or personal history of cancer, or with concerns about their risk of cancer, should discuss individual cancer screening recommendations with their doctor. 

Cervical Cancer Screening

  • Cervical cancer screening, which includes the Pap test and HPV testing, is an essential part of a woman's routine health care because it can detect cancer or abnormalities that may lead to cancer of the cervix.
  • Current cervical cancer screening guidelines recommend that women should have a Pap test every 3 years beginning at age 21. These guidelines further recommend that women ages 30 to 65 should have HPV and Pap cotesting every 5 years or a Pap test alone every 3 years. Women with certain risk factors may need to have more frequent screening or to continue screening beyond age 65.
  • Women who have received the HPV vaccine still need regular cervical screening.

Huntsman Cancer Institute’s Gynecology Oncology Program diagnoses and treats all cancers of the female reproductive tract, including ovarian, endometrial/ uterine, cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers. Our multidisciplinary team includes specialists in the screening and prevention of gynecologic cancers.