Colon Cancer

colon

Colon cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the colon.

The colon is part of the body’s digestive system. The digestive system removes and processes nutrients (vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water) from foods and helps pass waste material out of the body. The digestive system is made up of the esophagus, stomach, and the small and large intestines. The first 6 feet of the large intestine are called the large bowel or colon. The last 6 inches are the rectum and the anal canal. The anal canal ends at the anus (the opening of the large intestine to the outside of the body).

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

 

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors include the following:

  • A family history of cancer of the colon or rectum. Learn more about hereditary cancer risk from our Family Cancer Assessment Clinic.
  • Certain hereditary conditions, such as familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome).
  • A history of ulcerative colitis (ulcers in the lining of the large intestine) or Crohn disease.
  • A personal history of cancer of the colon, rectum, ovary, endometrium, or breast.
  • A personal history of polyps (small areas of bulging tissue) in the colon or rectum.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by colon cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • A change in bowel habits.
  • Blood (either bright red or very dark) in the stool.
  • Diarrhea, constipation, or feeling that the bowel does not empty all the way.
  • Stools that are narrower than usual.
  • Frequent gas pains, bloating, fullness, or cramps.
  • Weight loss for no known reason.
  • Feeling very tired.
  • Vomiting.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the colon and rectum are used to detect (find) and diagnose colon cancer.

The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Digital rectal exam: An exam of the rectum. The doctor or nurse inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the rectum to feel for lumps or anything else that seems unusual.
  • Fecal occult blood test: A test to check stool (solid waste) for blood that can only be seen with a microscope. Small samples of stool are placed on special cards and returned to the doctor or laboratory for testing.
  • Barium enema: A series of x-rays of the lower gastrointestinal tract. A liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic
    compound) is put into the rectum. The barium coats the lower gastrointestinal tract and
    x-rays are taken. This procedure is also called a lower GI series.
  • Sigmoidoscopy: A procedure to look inside the rectum and sigmoid (lower) colon for polyps (small areas of bulging tissue), other abnormal areas, or cancer. A sigmoidoscope is inserted through the rectum into the sigmoid colon. A sigmoidoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove polyps or tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer.
  • Colonoscopy: A procedure to look inside the rectum and colon for polyps, abnormal areas, or cancer. A colonoscope is inserted through the rectum into the colon. A colonoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove polyps or tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. For more information, view the video below.

 

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After colon cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the colon or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the colon or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment.

The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the abdomen or chest, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the colon. A substance called gadolinium is injected into the patient through a vein. The gadolinium collects around the cancer cells so they show up brighter in the picture. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • Surgery: A procedure to remove the tumor and see how far it has spread through the colon.
  • Lymph node biopsy: The removal of all or part of a lymph node. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells.
  • Complete blood count (CBC): A procedure in which a sample of blood is drawn and checked for the following:
    • The number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    • The amount of hemoglobin (the protein that carries oxygen) in the red blood cells.
    • The portion of the blood sample made up of red blood cells.
  • Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) assay: A test that measures the level of CEA in the blood. CEA is released into the bloodstream from both cancer cells and normal cells. When found in higher than normal amounts, it can be a sign of colon cancer or other conditions.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if colon cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually colon cancer cells. The disease is metastatic colon cancer, not lung cancer.

The following stages are used for colon cancer:

Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the mucosa (innermost layer) of the colon wall. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ.

Stage I

In stage I, cancer has formed in the mucosa (innermost layer) of the colon wall and has spread to the submucosa (layer of tissue under the mucosa). Cancer may have spread to the muscle layer of the colon wall.

Stage II

Stage II colon cancer is divided into stage IIA, stage IIB, and stage IIC.

  • Stage IIA: Cancer has spread through the muscle layer of the colon wall to the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall.
  • Stage IIB: Cancer has spread through the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall but has not spread to nearby organs.
  • Stage IIC: Cancer has spread through the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall to nearby organs.

Stage III

Stage III colon cancer is divided into stage IIIA, stage IIIB, and stage IIIC.

In stage IIIA:

  • Cancer may have spread through the mucosa (innermost layer) of the colon wall to the submucosa (layer of tissue under the mucosa) and may have spread to the muscle layer of the colon wall. Cancer has spread to at least one but not more than 3 nearby lymph nodes or cancer cells have formed in tissues near the lymph nodes; or
  • Cancer has spread through the mucosa (innermost layer) of the colon wall to the submucosa (layer of tissue under the mucosa). Cancer has spread to at least 4 but not more than 6 nearby lymph nodes.

In stage IIIB:

  • Cancer has spread through the muscle layer of the colon wall to the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall or has spread through the serosa but not to nearby organs. Cancer has spread to at least one but not more than 3 nearby lymph nodes or cancer cells have formed in tissues near the lymph nodes; or
  • Cancer has spread to the muscle layer of the colon wall or to the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall. Cancer has spread to at least 4 but not more than 6 nearby lymph nodes; or
  • Cancer has spread through the mucosa (innermost layer) of the colon wall to the submucosa (layer of tissue under the mucosa) and may have spread to the muscle layer of the colon wall. Cancer has spread to 7 or more nearby lymph nodes.

In stage IIIC:

  • Cancer has spread through the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall but has not spread to nearby organs. Cancer has spread to at least 4 but not more than 6 nearby lymph nodes; or
  • Cancer has spread through the muscle layer of the colon wall to the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall or has spread through the serosa but has not spread to nearby organs. Cancer has spread to 7 or more nearby lymph nodes; or
  • Cancer has spread through the serosa (outermost layer) of the colon wall and has spread to nearby organs. Cancer has spread to one or more nearby lymph nodes or cancer cells have formed in tissues near the lymph nodes.

Stage IV

Stage IV colon cancer is divided into stage IVA and stage IVB.

  • Stage IVA: Cancer may have spread through the colon wall and may have spread to nearby organs or lymph nodes. Cancer has spread to one organ that is not near the colon, such as the liver, lung, or ovary, or to a distant lymph node.
  • Stage IVB: Cancer may have spread through the colon wall and may have spread to nearby organs or lymph nodes. Cancer has spread to more than one organ that is not near the colon or into the lining of the abdominal wall.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, colorectal cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including gastroenterologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the digestive system), surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with colon cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Six types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Surgery (removing the cancer in an operation) is the most common treatment for all stages of colon cancer. A doctor may remove the cancer using one of the following types of surgery:

  • Local excision: If the cancer is found at a very early stage, the doctor may remove it without cutting through the abdominal wall. Instead, the doctor may put a tube with a cutting tool through the rectum into the colon and cut the cancer out. This is called a local excision. If the cancer is found in a polyp (a small bulging area of tissue), the operation is called a polypectomy.
  • Resection of the colon with anastomosis: If the cancer is larger, the doctor will perform a partial colectomy (removing the cancer and a small amount of healthy tissue around it). The doctor may then perform an anastomosis (sewing the healthy parts of the colon together). The doctor will also usually remove lymph nodes near the colon and examine them under a microscope to see whether they contain cancer.
  • Resection of the colon with colostomy: If the doctor is not able to sew the 2 ends of the colon back together, a stoma (an opening) is made on the outside of the body for waste to pass through. This procedure is called a colostomy. A bag is placed around the stoma to collect the waste. Sometimes the colostomy is needed only until the lower colon has healed, and then it can be reversed. If the doctor needs to remove the entire lower colon, however, the colostomy may be permanent.

Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the operation, some patients may be given chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after the surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Radiofrequency Ablation

Radiofrequency ablation is the use of a special probe with tiny electrodes that kill cancer cells. Sometimes the probe is inserted directly through the skin and only local anesthesia is needed. In other cases, the probe is inserted through an incision in the abdomen. This is done in the hospital with general anesthesia.

Cryosurgery

Cryosurgery is a treatment that uses an instrument to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue. This type of treatment is also called cryotherapy.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy).

Chemoembolization of the hepatic artery may be used to treat cancer that has spread to the liver. This involves blocking the hepatic artery (the main artery that supplies blood to the liver) and injecting anticancer drugs between the blockage and the liver. The liver’s arteries then deliver the drugs throughout the liver. Only a small amount of the drug reaches other parts of the body. The blockage may be temporary or permanent, depending on what is used to block the artery. The liver continues to receive some blood from the hepatic portal vein, which carries blood from the stomach and intestine.

The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.


Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells.

Types of targeted therapies used in the treatment of colon cancer include the following:

  • Monoclonal antibodies: Monoclonal antibodies are made in the laboratory from a single type of immune system cell. These antibodies can identify substances on cancer cells or normal substances that may help cancer cells grow. The antibodies attach to the substances and kill the cancer cells, block their growth, or keep them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry drugs, toxins, or radioactive material directly to cancer cells.
  • Angiogenesis inhibitors: Angiogenesis inhibitors stop the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow.

Clinical trials

These studies discover and evaluate new and improved cancer treatments. Patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors about participating in a clinical trial or any questions regarding research studies. For more information, also visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website April 2014

El cáncer de colon es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos del colon.

El colon forma parte del aparato digestivo. El aparato digestivo elimina y procesa nutrientes (como las vitaminas, los minerales, los carbohidratos, las grasas, las proteínas y el agua) de los alimentos y ayuda a eliminar los desechos del cuerpo. El aparato digestivo está formado por el esófago, el estómago y los intestinos delgado y grueso. A los primeros 6 pies del intestino grueso también se le llama el colon mientras que las últimas 6 pulgadas se denominan recto y conducto anal. El conducto anal termina en el ano (apertura del colon a la parte exterior del cuerpo).

Los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal se pueden presentar en el colon. Para mayor información consultar el sumario sobre tumores del estroma gastrointestinal.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta las probabilidades de presentar una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a tener cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se va a presentar cáncer. Consultar con su médico si piensa que tiene riesgos. Se desconoce la causa de la leucemia de células pilosas. Esta se presenta con mayor frecuencia en hombres de edad avanzada.

  • Antecedentes familiares de cáncer del colon o del recto.
  • Ciertas afecciones hereditarias, tales como la poliposis adenomatosa familiar y el cáncer de colon hereditario sin poliposis (CCHSP; síndrome de Lynch).
  • Antecedentes de colitis ulcerosa (úlceras en el revestimiento del colon) o enfermedad de Crohn.
  • Antecedentes personales de cáncer de colon, recto, ovario, endometrio o mama.
  • Antecedentes personales de pólipos (áreas pequeñas y protuberantes de tejido) en el colon o el recto.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de colon u otras afecciones pueden producir estos y otros signos y síntomas. Consulte su médico si presenta lo siguiente:

  • Cambio en los hábitos de deposición.
  • Sangre en las heces (ya sea color rojo muy vivo o muy oscuro).
  • Diarrea, estreñimiento, o sensación de que el intestino no se vacía completamente.
  • Heces más delgadas de lo normal.
  • Dolor frecuente ocasionado por gases, flatulencia, saciedad o calambres).
  • Pérdida de peso sin razón aparente.
  • Mucho cansancio.
  • Vómitos.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de colon, se utilizan pruebas que examinan el colon y el recto.

Entre los procedimientos que se pueden utilizar se encuentran los siguientes:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para revisar los signos generales de salud, incluso verificar si hay signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. También se toman los antecedentes médicos de las enfermedades y los tratamientos anteriores del paciente.
  • Examen digital del recto: el médico o enfermero introduce un dedo cubierto por un guante lubricado en el recto para palpar y ver si hay masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca poco usual.
  • Prueba de sangre oculta en la materia fecal: análisis que evalúa la presencia de sangre visible solamente al microscopio en las heces (residuos sólidos). Se colocan muestras pequeñas de heces sobre tarjetas especiales y se envían al médico o al laboratorio para evaluación.
  • Enema de bario: serie de rayos X del tubo gastrointestinal inferior. Se introduce en el recto un líquido que contiene bario (un compuesto metálico, de color plateado blancuzco). El líquido recubre el tubo digestivo inferior del que luego se toman radiografías. Este procedimiento también se llama serie gastrointestinal (GI) inferior.
  • Sigmoidoscopia: procedimiento para observar el interior del recto y el colon sigmoide (inferior) para verificar si hay pólipos (áreas pequeñas y protuberantes de tejido), otras áreas anormales o cáncer. Se inserta un sigmoidoscopio a través del recto hasta el colon sigmoide. Un sigmoidoscopio es un instrumento delgado con forma de tubo con una luz y un lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer pólipos o muestras de tejido, que se observan bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de cáncer.
  • Colonoscopia: procedimiento para observar el interior del recto y el colon para determinar si hay pólipos, áreas anormales o cáncer. Se inserta un colonoscopio a través del recto hasta el colon. Un colonoscopio es un instrumento delgado con forma de tubo que tiene una luz y un lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer pólipos o muestras de tejido para verificar bajo un microscopio si hay signos de cáncer.
  • Colonoscopía virtual: procedimiento en el que se usa una serie de rayos X llamada tomografía computarizada para captar una serie de imágenes del colon. Una computadora agrupa las imágenes para crear otras imágenes detalladas que pueden mostrar pólipos y cualquier otra cosa que parezca inusual en la superficie interna del colon. Esta prueba también se llama colonografía o colonografía por TC.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo las pueda observar al microscopio y verificar si hay signos de cáncer.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después del diagnóstico del cáncer de colon, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se han diseminado dentro del colon o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso que se utiliza para determinar si el cáncer se ha diseminado dentro del colon o a otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información que se reúne durante el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio de la enfermedad a fin de planificar el tratamiento.

Las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos se pueden utilizar en el proceso de estadificación:

  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, como el abdomen o el pecho, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento en el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del colon. Se inyecta al paciente una sustancia llamada gadolinio a través de una vena, y este se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas para hacerlas aparecer más brillantes en la imagen. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El explorador TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y huesos del interior del tórax. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Cirugía : procedimiento para extirpar el tumor y determinar a qué distancia del colon se diseminó.
  • Biopsia de ganglios linfáticos: extracción de parte o de todo el ganglio linfático. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio para determinar si hay presencia de células cancerosas.
  • Recuento sanguíneo completo (RSC): procedimiento por el cual se toma una muestra de sangre para verificar los siguientes elementos:
    • La cantidad de glóbulos rojos, glóbulos blancos y plaquetas.
    • La cantidad de hemoglobina (la proteína que transporta oxígeno) en los glóbulos rojos.
    • La parte de la muestra de sangre compuesta por glóbulos rojos.
  • Prueba del antígeno carcinoembrionario (ACE): prueba por la que se mide la concentración de ACE en la sangre. El ACE se libera en el torrente sanguíneo tanto por las células cancerosas como por las células normales. Cuando se encuentra en cantidades más altas de lo normal, puede ser un signo de cáncer de colon u otras afecciones.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo.

Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de colon se disemina a los pulmones, las células cancerosas en los pulmones son en realidad células de cáncer de colon. La enfermedad es cáncer de colon metastásico y no cáncer de pulmón.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el cáncer de colon:

Estadio 0 (carcinoma in situ)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en la mucosa (capa más interna) de la pared del colon. Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse. El estadio 0 también se llama carcinoma in situ.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se formó en la mucosa (capa más interna) de la pared del colon y se diseminó hasta la submucosa (capa de tejido debajo de la mucosa). El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta la capa muscular de la pared del colon.

Estadio II

El cáncer de colon en estadio II, se divide en estadio IIA, estadio IIB y estadio IIC.

  • Estadio IIA: el cáncer se diseminó a través de la capa muscular de la pared del colon hasta la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon.
  • Estadio IIB: el cáncer se diseminó a través de la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon, pero no se diseminó a los órganos cercanos.
  • Estadio IIC: el cáncer se diseminó a través de la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon hasta los órganos cercanos.

Estadio III

El cáncer de colon en estadio III, se divide en estadio IIIA, estadio IIIB y estadio IIIC.

En el estadio IIIA:

  • El cáncer se puede haber diseminado a través de la mucosa (capa más interna) de la pared del colon hasta la submucosa (capa de tejido debajo de la mucosa) y se puede haber diseminado hasta la capa muscular de la pared del colon. El cáncer se diseminó a por lo menos uno, pero no más de tres ganglios linfáticos cercanos, o se formaron células cancerosas en los tejidos cercanos a los ganglios linfáticos, o
  • El cáncer se diseminó a través de la mucosa (capa más interna) de la pared del colon hasta la submucosa (capa de tejido debajo de la mucosa). El cáncer se diseminó a cuatro, pero no a más de seis, ganglios linfáticos cercanos.

En el estadio IIIB:

  • El cáncer se diseminó a través de la capa muscular del colon hasta la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon o se diseminó a través de la serosa, pero no hasta los órganos cercanos. El cáncer se diseminó hasta uno, pero no más de tres, ganglios linfáticos cercanos o se formaron células cancerosas en los tejidos cercanos a los ganglios linfáticos, o
  • El cáncer se diseminó hasta la capa muscular de la pared del colon o hasta la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon. El cáncer se disemino a por lo menos cuatro, pero no más de seis, ganglios linfáticos cercanos, o
  • El cáncer se diseminó a través de la mucosa (capa más interna) de la pared del colon hasta la submucosa (capa de tejido debajo de la mucosa) y se puede haber diseminado hasta la capa muscular de la pared del colon. El cáncer se diseminó a siete o más ganglios linfáticos cercanos.

En el estadio IIIC:

  • El cáncer se diseminó a través de la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon, pero no se diseminó hasta los órganos cercanos. El cáncer se diseminó a por lo menos cuatro, pero no más de seis, ganglios linfáticos cercanos, o
  • El cáncer se diseminó a través de la capa muscular de la pared del colon hasta la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon o se diseminó a través de la serosa, pero no se diseminó hasta los órganos cercanos. El cáncer se diseminó a siete o más ganglios linfáticos cercanos, o
  • El cáncer se diseminó a través de la serosa (capa más externa) de la pared del colon y se diseminó hasta órganos cercanos. El cáncer se diseminó a uno o más ganglios linfáticos cercanos, o se formaron células cancerosas en los tejidos cercanos a los ganglios linfáticos.

Estadio IV

El cáncer de colon en estadio IV se divide en estadio IVA y estadio IVB.

  • Estadio IVA: el cáncer se puede haber diseminado a través de la pared del colon y se puede haber diseminado a órganos o ganglios linfáticos cercanos. El cáncer se diseminó a un órgano que no está cerca del colon, como el hígado, un pulmón o un ovario, o hasta un ganglio linfático lejano.
  • Estadio IVB: el cáncer se puede haber diseminado a través de la pared del colon y se puede haber diseminado hasta órganos o ganglios linfáticos cercanos. El cáncer se diseminó a más de un órgano que no está cerca del colon o hasta el revestimiento de la pared abdominal.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes con cáncer del colon. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente en uso) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento consiste en un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían considerar su participación en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan seis tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Ablación por radiofrecuencia
  • Criocirugía
  • Quimioterapia
  • Radioterapia
  • Terapia dirigida

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La cirugía (extirpación del cáncer en una operación) es el tratamiento más común en todos los estadios de cáncer de colon. El médico puede extirpar el cáncer mediante uno de los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Escisión local: si el cáncer se encuentra en un estadio muy inicial, el médico puede extraerlo sin hacer una incisión en la pared abdominal. En cambio, el médico puede introducir un tubo con un instrumento cortante a través del recto hacia el colon y hacer una incisión para extraer el cáncer. Esto se denomina escisión local. Si el cáncer se localiza en un pólipo (una protuberancia del tejido), la operación se denomina polipectomía.
  • Resección del colon con anastomosis: si el cáncer tiene un mayor tamaño, el médico realiza una colectomía parcial (extracción del cáncer y una pequeña cantidad de tejido sano circundante). Luego, el médico puede realizar una anastomosis (coser las partes sanas del colon). En general, el médico también extrae los ganglios linfáticos cercanos al colon y los observa bajo un microscopio para determinar si tienen cáncer.
  • Resección del colon con colostomía: si el médico no puede coser los dos extremos del colon, se practica un estoma (abertura) en la parte externa del cuerpo para permitir el paso de desechos. Este procedimiento se denomina colostomía. Se coloca una bolsa alrededor del estoma para obtener los desechos. En algunas ocasiones, la colostomía solo se necesita hasta que haya sanado el tramo inferior del colon y luego puede revertirse. Sin embargo, si el médico necesita extraer todo el tramo inferior del colon, la colostomía puede ser permanente.

Incluso si el médico extirpa todo el cáncer visible al momento de la cirugía, el paciente tal vez sea sometido a quimioterapia o radioterapia después de la cirugía a fin de eliminar toda célula cancerosa que haya quedado. El tratamiento administrado después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Ablación por radiofrecuencia

La ablación por radiofrecuencia consiste en el uso de un catéter especial con electrodos pequeños que destruyen células cancerosas. A veces el catéter se inserta directamente a través de la piel y solo se necesita anestesia local. En otras ocasiones, el catéter se inserta a través de una incisión en el abdomen. Esto se lleva a cabo en un hospital bajo anestesia general.

Criocirugía

La criocirugía es un tratamiento en el que se usa un instrumento para congelar y destruir tejido anormal. Este tipo de tratamiento también se llama crioterapia.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por boca o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional).

La quimioembolización de la arteria hepática se puede utilizar como tratamiento para el cáncer que se ha diseminado hasta el hígado. Esto implica la obstrucción de la arteria hepática (la arteria principal que suministra sangre al hígado) y la inyección de medicamentos anticancerosos entre el bloqueo y el hígado. Las arterias del hígado se encargan entonces de repartir los medicamentos a través del hígado. Solo una pequeña cantidad del medicamento se extiende a otras partes del cuerpo. El bloqueo puede ser temporal o permanente, dependiendo de lo que se utiliza para bloquear la arteria. El hígado continúa recibiendo un poco de sangre de la vena porta hepática, que lleva la sangre desde el estómago y el intestino.

La forma en que se administra la quimioterapia depender del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que estas crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa usa una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía la radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres, que se coloca directamente en el cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y del estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento para el que se utilizan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales.

Hay tipos de terapia dirigida que se usan en el tratamiento del cáncer de colon como las siguientes:

  • Anticuerpos monoclonales: los anticuerpos monoclonales se producen en el laboratorio a partir de un tipo único de células del sistema inmunitario. Estos anticuerpos pueden identificar sustancias en las células cancerosas o sustancias normales en el cuerpo que pueden ayudar a la formación de células cancerosas. Los anticuerpos se adhieren a las sustancias y destruyen las células cancerosas, impiden su crecimiento o previenen que se diseminen. Los anticuerpos monoclonales se administran por infusión. Se pueden utilizar solos o para administrar medicamentos, toxinas o material radiactivo directamente hasta las células cancerosas.
  • Inhibidores de la angiogénesis: los inhibidores de la angiogénesis detienen en la formación de vasos sanguíneos nuevos que los tumores necesitan para crecer.

Ensayos clínicos

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Ignacio Garrido-Laguna, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0193
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4266

Specialties: Biliary Cancer, Colon Cancer, Medical Oncology, Oncology, Pancreatic Cancer

Robert E. Glasgow, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-6035
University Hospital (801) 585-6035

Specialties: Acute Care Surgery, Barrett's Esophagus, Colorectal Surgery, Endocrine Surgery (Adrenal, Thyroid, Parathyroid), Esophageal Diseases, Esophageal Surgery, GI Motility, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

William J. Peche, M.S.P.H., M.D.

Specialties: Colon Cancer, Colorectal Surgery, Endoscopy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Crohn's/Ulcerative Colitis, Surgery, General

N. Jewel Samadder, M.Sc., M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-9797
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-9797

Specialties: Clinical Genetics, Colon Cancer, Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Pancreatic Cancer

Mark Savarise, M.D.

Locations
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-5026

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Breast Surgery, Colorectal Surgery, Endoscopy, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Sclerotherapy, Spider Veins, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy

Courtney L. Scaife, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-6911

Specialties: Colorectal Surgery, Esophageal Surgery, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oncology Surgery, Pancreatic Cancer, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Sunil Sharma, M.B.A., M.D., FACP

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4266

Specialties: Clinical Scientist, Colon Cancer, Liver Cancer, Oncology, Pancreatic Cancer

John R. Weis, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-0262

Specialties: Colon Cancer, Oncology, Pancreatic Cancer

Related Documents

Videos
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

kevin walker make an appointmentGastrointestinal Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Christy Steele
Phone: 801-587-4422
E-mail: christy.steele@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA) prevents health insurance companies from denying coverage or adjusting premiums based on genetic information, and also prevents employers from using genetic information to influence hiring, firing, promotion, or salary-related decisions.
  • The colon is usually four to five feet long. The rectum is the last several inches of the colon.
clc graphic right column