Esophageal Cancer

esophagusEsophageal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the esophagus.

The esophagus is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from the throat to the stomach. The wall of the esophagus is made up of several layers of tissue, including mucous membrane, muscle, and connective tissue. Esophageal cancer starts at the inside lining of the esophagus and spreads outward through the other layers as it grows.

The two most common forms of esophageal cancer are named for the type of cells that become malignant (cancerous):

  • Squamous cell carcinoma: Cancer that forms in squamous cells, the thin, flat cells lining the esophagus. This cancer is most often found in the upper and middle part of the esophagus, but can occur anywhere along the esophagus. This is also called epidermoid carcinoma.
  • Adenocarcinoma: Cancer that begins in glandular (secretory) cells. Glandular cells in the lining of the esophagus produce and release fluids such as mucus. Adenocarcinomas usually form in the lower part of the esophagus, near the stomach.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors include the following:

  • Tobacco use.
  • Heavy alcohol use.
  • Barrett esophagus: A condition in which the cells lining the lower part of the esophagus have changed or been replaced with abnormal cells that could lead to cancer of the esophagus. Gastric reflux (the backing up of stomach contents into the lower section of the esophagus) may irritate the esophagus and, over time, cause Barrett esophagus.
  • Older age.
  • Being male.
  • Being African-American.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by esophageal cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Painful or difficult swallowing.
  • Weight loss.
  • Pain behind the breastbone.
  • Hoarseness and cough.
  • Indigestion and heartburn.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the esophagus are used to detect (find) and diagnose esophageal cancer.

The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • Barium swallow: A series of x-rays of the esophagus and stomach. The patient drinks a liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and x-rays are taken. This procedure is also called an upper GI series.
  • Esophagoscopy: A procedure to look inside the esophagus to check for abnormal areas. An esophagoscope is inserted through the mouth or nose and down the throat into the esophagus. An esophagoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope
    for signs of cancer. When the esophagus and stomach are looked at, it is called an upper endoscopy.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. The biopsy is usually done during an esophagoscopy. Sometimes a biopsy shows changes in the esophagus that are not cancer but may lead to cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After esophageal cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the esophagus or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out if cancer cells have spread within the esophagus or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • Bronchoscopy: A procedure to look inside the trachea and large airways in the lung for abnormal areas. A bronchoscope is inserted through the nose or mouth into the trachea and lungs. A bronchoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radionuclide glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do. A PET scan and CT scan may be done at the same time. This is called a PET-CT.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS): A procedure in which an endoscope is inserted into the body, usually through the mouth or rectum. An endoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. A probe at the end of the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. This procedure is also called endosonography.
  • Thoracoscopy: A surgical procedure to look at the organs inside the chest to check for abnormal areas. An incision (cut) is made between two ribs and a thoracoscope is inserted into the chest. A thoracoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue or lymph node samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. In some cases, this procedure may be used to remove part of the esophagus or lung.
  • Laparoscopy: A surgical procedure to look at the organs inside the abdomen to check for signs of disease. Small incisions (cuts) are made in the wall of the abdomen and a laparoscope (a thin, lighted tube) is inserted into one of the incisions. Other instruments may be inserted through the same or other incisions to perform procedures such as removing organs or taking tissue samples to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if esophageal cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually esophageal cancer cells. The disease is metastatic esophageal cancer, not lung cancer.

The following stages are used for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus:

Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the inner (mucosal) layer of the esophageal wall. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called high-grade dysplasia.

Stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

Stage I is divided into Stage IA and Stage IB, depending on where the cancer is found.

  • Stage IA: Cancer has formed in the inner (mucosal) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells look a lot like normal cells under a microscope.
  • Stage IB: Cancer has formed:
    • in the inner (mucosal) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells do not look at all like normal cells under a microscope; or
    • in the inner (mucosal) layer and spread into the middle (muscle) layer or the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells look a lot like normal cells under a microscope. The tumor is in the lower esophagus or it is not known where the tumor is.

Stage II squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

Stage II is divided into Stage IIA and Stage IIB, depending on where the cancer has spread.

  • Stage IIA: Cancer has spread:
    • into the middle (muscle) layer or the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells look a lot like normal cells under a microscope. The tumor is in either the upper or middle esophagus; or
    • into the middle (muscle) layer or the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells do not look at all like normal cells under a microscope. The tumor is in the lower esophagus or it is not known where the tumor is.
  • Stage IIB: Cancer:
    • has spread into the middle (muscle) layer or the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells do not look at all like normal cells under a microscope. The tumor is in either the upper or middle esophagus; or
    • is in the inner (mucosal) layer and may have spread into the middle (muscle) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 1 or 2 lymph nodes near the tumor.

Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

Stage III is divided into Stage IIIA, Stage IIIB, and Stage IIIC, depending on where the cancer has spread.

  • Stage IIIA: Cancer:
    • is in the inner (mucosal) layer and may have spread into the middle (muscle) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 3 to 6 lymph nodes near the tumor; or
    • has spread into the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 1 or 2 lymph nodes near the tumor; or
    • has spread into the diaphragm, sac around the heart, or tissue that covers the lungs and lines the inner wall of the chest cavity. The cancer can be removed b surgery.
  • Stage IIIB: Cancer has spread into the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 3 to 6 lymph nodes near the tumor.
  • Stage IIIC: Cancer has spread:
    • into the diaphragm, sac around the heart, or tissue that covers the lungs and lines the inner wall of the chest cavity; the cancer can be removed by surgery. Cancer is found in 1 to 6 lymph nodes near the tumor; or
    • into other nearby organs such as the aorta, trachea, or spine, and the cancer cannot be removed by surgery; or
    • to 7 or more lymph nodes near the tumor.

Stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

In Stage IV, cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

The following stages are used for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus:

Stage 0 (High-grade Dysplasia)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the inner (mucosal) layer of the esophageal wall. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called high-grade dysplasia.

Stage I adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

Stage I is divided into Stage IA and Stage IB, depending on where the cancer is found.

  • Stage IA: Cancer has formed in the inner (mucosal) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells look a lot like normal cells under a microscope.
  • Stage IB: Cancer has formed:
    • in the inner (mucosal) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells do not look at all like normal cells under a microscope and they grow quickly; or
    • in the inner (mucosal) layer and spread into the middle (muscle) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells look a lot like normal cells under a microscope.

Stage II adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

Stage II is divided into Stage IIA and Stage IIB, depending on where the cancer has spread.

  • Stage IIA: Cancer has spread into the middle (muscle) layer of the esophageal wall. The tumor cells do not look at all like normal cells under a microscope and they grow quickly.
  • Stage IIB: Cancer:
    • has spread into the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall; or
    • is in the inner (mucosal) layer and may have spread into the middle (muscle) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 1 or 2 lymph nodes near the tumor.

Stage III adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

Stage III is divided into Stage IIIA, Stage IIIB, and Stage IIIC, depending on where the cancer has spread.

  • Stage IIIA: Cancer:
    • is in the inner (mucosal) layer and may have spread into the middle (muscle) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 3 to 6 lymph nodes near the tumor; or
    • has spread into the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 1 or 2 lymph nodes near the tumor; or
    • has spread into the diaphragm, sac around the heart, or tissue that covers the lungs, and lines the inner wall of the chest cavity. The cancer can be removed by surgery.
  • Stage IIIB: Cancer has spread into the outer (connective tissue) layer of the esophageal wall. Cancer is found in 3 to 6 lymph nodes near the tumor.
  • Stage IIIC: Cancer has spread:
    • into the diaphragm, sac around the heart, or tissue that covers the lungs and lines the inner wall of the chest cavity; the cancer can be removed by surgery. Cancer is found in 1 to 6 lymph nodes near the tumor; or
    • into other nearby organs such as the aorta, trachea, or spine, and the cancer cannot be removed by surgery; or
    • to 7 or more lymph nodes near the tumor.

Stage IV adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

In Stage IV, cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), esophageal cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including gastroenterologists (doctors who specialize in treating problems of the digestive organs), surgeons, medical oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with medicine), radiation oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with radiation), nurses, dietitians, respiratory therapists, speech pathologists, and social workers.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with esophageal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Patients have special nutritional needs during treatment for esophageal cancer. Many people with esophageal cancer find it hard to eat because they have trouble swallowing. The esophagus may be narrowed by the tumor or as a side effect of treatment. Some patients may receive nutrients directly into a vein. Others may need a feeding tube (a flexible plastic tube that is passed through the nose or mouth into the stomach) until they are able to eat on their own. View HCI's Nutrition Care Services to learn more about our dietitians and ways to cope with nutrition-related changes.

Six types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Surgery is the most common treatment for cancer of the esophagus. Part of the esophagus may be removed in an operation called an esophagectomy.

The doctor will connect the remaining healthy part of the esophagus to the stomach so the patient can still swallow. A plastic tube or part of the intestine may be used to make the connection. Lymph nodes near the esophagus may also be removed and viewed under a microscope to see if they contain cancer. If the esophagus is partly blocked by the tumor, an expandable metal stent (tube) may be placed inside the esophagus to help keep it open.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

A plastic tube may be inserted into the esophagus to keep it open during radiation therapy. This is called intraluminal intubation and dilation.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Chemoradiation therapy

Chemoradiation therapy combines chemotherapy and radiation therapy to increase the effects of both.

Laser therapy

Laser therapy is a cancer treatment that uses a laser beam (a narrow beam of intense light) to kill cancer cells.

Electrocoagulation

Electrocoagulation is the use of an electric current to kill cancer cells.

Clinical trials

These studies discover and evaluate new and improved cancer treatments. Patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors about participating in a clinical trial or any questions regarding research studies. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, work, or normal daily life.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de esófago es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos del esófago.

El esófago es el tubo hueco, muscular que transporta los alimentos y los líquidos desde la garganta al estómago. La pared del esófago comprende varias capas de tejido, incluyendo la membrana mucosa, músculo y tejido conjuntivo. El cáncer de esófago comienza en el revestimiento interior del esófago y se disemina hacia afuera hasta las otras capas a medida que crece.

Las dos formas más comunes de cáncer de esófago se denominan de acuerdo con el tipo de células que se vuelven malignas (cancerosas):

  • Carcinoma de células escamosas: cáncer que se forma en las células escamosas, las células delgadas, planas que revisten el esófago. Este tipo de cáncer se encuentra con mayor frecuencia en la parte superior y media del esófago, pero se puede presentar en cualquier lugar del esófago. También se llama carcinoma epidermoide.
  • Adenocarcinoma: cáncer que comienza en las células glandulares (secretorias). Células glandulares en el revestimiento del esófago que producen y liberan líquidos como el moco. Los adenocarcinomas habitualmente se forman en la parte inferior del esófago, cerca del estómago.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumente el riesgo de enfermarse se llama un factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a enfermar de cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se vaya a enfermar de cáncer. Consultar con el médico si piensa que puede estar en riesgo. Entre los factores de riesgo están los siguientes:

  • Consumo de tabaco.
  • Consumo alto de alcohol.
  • Esófago de Barrett: afección en la cual las células que revisten la parte inferior del esófago han cambiado o fueron remplazadas por células anormales que pueden llevar al cáncer de esófago. El reflujo gástrico (el retorno del contenido del estómago a la sección inferior del esófago) puede irritar el esófago y, con el transcurso del tiempo, causar esófago de Barrett.
  • Edad avanzada.
  • Sexo masculino.
  • Ser afroestadounidense.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de esófago u otras afecciones pueden producir estos y otros signos y síntomas. Consulte con su médico si presenta los problemas siguientes:

  • Dolor o dificultad para tragar.
  • Pérdida de peso.
  • Dolor detrás del esternón.
  • Ronquera y tos.
  • Indigestión y acidez estomacal.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de esófago, se utilizan pruebas que examinan el esófago. Pueden utilizarse las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para revisar el estado general de salud, e identificar cualquier signo de enfermedad, como nódulos o cualquier otra cosa que parezca inusual. También se toman datos sobre los hábitos de salud del paciente, así como los antecedentes de enfermedades y los tratamientos aplicados en cada caso.
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y huesos del interior del pecho. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Ingesta de bario: serie de radiografías del esófago y el estómago. El paciente bebe un líquido que contiene bario (compuesto metálico de color plateado blancuzco). Este líquido reviste el esófago y el estómago, y se toman radiografías. Este procedimiento también se llama serie gastrointestinal (GI) superior.
  • Esofagoscopia: procedimiento para examinar el interior del esófago para verificar si hay áreas anormales. Se inserta un esofagoscopio a través de la boca o la nariz y se lo hace bajar por la garganta hasta el esófago. Un esofagoscopio es un instrumento con forma de tubo delgado, con una luz y una lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer muestras de tejido, que se observan bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de cáncer. Cuando se examinan el esófago y el estómago, se llama endoscopia superior.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo las pueda observar bajo un microscopio y verificar si hay signos de cáncer. La biopsia generalmente se lleva a cabo durante una esofagoscopia. En algunas ocasiones, la biopsia muestra cambios en el esófago que no son cáncer pero que pueden llevar a cáncer. 

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticarse el cáncer de esófago, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro del esófago o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro del esófago o a otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio de la enfermedad a fin de planificar el tratamiento. En el proceso de estadificación, se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Broncoscopia: procedimiento para observar el interior de la tráquea y las vías respiratorias mayores del pulmón y determinar si hay áreas anormales. Se introduce un broncoscopio a través de la nariz o la boca hacia la tráquea y los pulmones. Un broncoscopio es un instrumento delgado en forma de tubo, con una luz y una lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer muestras de tejido y observarlas bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de cáncer.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, como el pecho, el abdomen y la pelvis, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. De forma adicional se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El explorador por TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales. Una exploración con TEP y por TC se pueden realizar al mismo tiempo, esto se llama una PET-TC.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Ecografía endoscópica (EE): procedimiento para el cual se introduce un endoscopio en el cuerpo, por lo general, a través de la boca o el recto. Un endoscopio es un instrumento delgado en forma de tubo, con una luz y una lente para observar. Se usa una sonda ubicada en el extremo del endoscopio para hacer rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasónicas) en los tejidos o los órganos internos y crear ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos del cuerpo que se llama sonograma. Este procedimiento también se llama endoecografía.
  • Toracoscopia: procedimiento quirúrgico que se realiza para observar si hay áreas anormales en los órganos internos del pecho. Se hace una incisión (corte) entre dos costillas y se introduce un toracoscopio en el pecho. Un toracoscopio es un instrumento delgado con forma de tubo, con una luz y una lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer tejido o muestras de ganglios linfáticos, que se observan bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de cáncer. En algunos casos, se puede utilizar este procedimiento para extirpar parte del esófago o el pulmón.
  • Laparoscopia: procedimiento quirúrgico para observar los órganos del interior del abdomen y determinar si hay signos de enfermedad. Se realizan pequeñas incisiones (cortes) en la pared del abdomen y se introduce un laparoscopio (tubo delgado, con luz) a través de una de las incisiones. Se pueden introducir otros instrumentos en la misma incisión o en otras para realizar procedimientos tales como extirpar órganos o tomar muestras de tejido para observarlas bajo un microscopio y verificar si hay signos de enfermedad.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó hasta otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de esófago se disemina hasta los pulmones, las células cancerosas en los pulmones son, en realidad, células de cáncer de esófago. La enfermedad es cáncer de esófago metastásico y no cáncer de pulmón.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el carcinoma de células escamosas de esófago:

Estadio 0 (displasia de grado alto)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en la capa interna (mucosa) del tejido que reviste la pared esofágica. Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse hacia el tejido cercano normal. El estadio 0 también se llama displasia de grado alto.

Estadio I del carcinoma de células escamosas de esófago

El estadio I se divide en estadio IA y estadio IB, de acuerdo con el lugar donde se encuentra el cáncer.

  • Estadio IA. El cáncer se formó en la capa interna (mucosa) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales se parecen mucho a las células normales cuando se las observa al microscopio.
  • Estadio IB. El cáncer se formó en uno de los siguientes sitios:
    • En la capa interna (mucosa) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales no se parecen para nada a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio; o
    • En la capa interna (mucosa) y se diseminó hacia la capa media (muscular) o la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales se parecen mucho a las células normales bajo un microscopio. El tumor está en la parte inferior del esófago o no se conoce el sitio del tumor.

Estadio II del carcinoma de células escamosas de esófago

El estadio II se divide en estadio IIA y estadio IIB, de acuerdo con el lugar donde se diseminó el cáncer.

  • Estadio IIA. El cáncer se diseminó hacia uno de los siguientes sitios:
    • Hacia la capa media (muscular) o la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales se parecen mucho a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio. El tumor está en la parte superior o media del esófago; o
    • Hacia la capa media (muscular) o externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Las células normales no se parecen mucho a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio. El tumor está en la parte inferior del esófago o no se conoce el sitio del tumor.
  • Estadio IIB. El cáncer:
    • Se diseminó hacia la capa media (muscular) o la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales no se parecen mucho a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio. El tumor está en la parte superior o la parte media del esófago; o
    • Está en la capa media (mucosa) y se puede haber diseminado hacia la capa media (muscular) de la pared esofágica. El cáncer se encuentra en 1 o 2 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor.

Estadio III del carcinoma de células escamosas de esófago

El estadio III se divide en estadio IIIA, estadio IIIB y estadio IIIC, de acuerdo con el lugar donde se diseminó el cáncer.

  • Estadio IIIA. El cáncer:
    • Está en la capa interna (mucosa) y se puede haber diseminado hacia la capa media (muscular) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 3 a 6 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor; o
    • Se diseminó hacia la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 1 o 2 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor; o
    • Se diseminó hacia el diafragma, la bolsa que rodea el corazón o el tejido que cubre los pulmones y reviste la pared interna de la cavidad torácica. El cáncer se puede extirpar mediante cirugía.
  • Estadio IIIB. El cáncer se diseminó hacia la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 3 a 6 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor.
  • Estadio IIIC. El cáncer se diseminó:
    • Hacia el diafragma, la bolsa que rodea el corazón o el tejido que cubre los pulmones y reviste la pared interna de la cavidad torácica; se puede extirpar el cáncer mediante cirugía. Se encuentra cáncer en 1 a 6 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor; o
    • Hacia órganos cercanos, como la aorta, la tráquea o la espina vertebral, y el cáncer no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía; o
    • Hasta siete o más ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor.

Estadio IV del carcinoma de células escamosas de esófago

En el estadio IV, el cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el adenocarcinoma de esófago:

Estadio 0 (displasia de grado alto)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en la capa interna (mucosa) del tejido que reviste la pared esofágica. Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse hacia el tejido cercano normal. El estadio 0 también se llama displasia de grado alto.

Estadio I del adenocarcinoma de esófago

El estadio I se divide en estadio IA y estadio IB, de acuerdo con el lugar donde se encuentra el cáncer.

  • Estadio IA. El cáncer se formó en la capa interna (mucosa) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales se parecen mucho a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio.
  • Estadio IB. El cáncer se formó en uno de los siguientes sitios:
    • La capa interna (mucosa) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales no se parecen en nada a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio y crecen rápidamente; o
    • La capa interna (mucosa) y se diseminan hacia la capa media (muscular) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales se parecen mucho a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio.

Estadio II del adenocarcinoma de esófago

El estadio II se divide en estadio IIA y estadio IIB, de acuerdo con el lugar donde se encuentra el cáncer.

  • Estadio IIA. El cáncer se diseminó hacia la capa media (muscular) de la pared esofágica. Las células tumorales no se parecen en nada a las células normales cuando se las observa bajo un microscopio y crecen rápidamente.
  • Estadio IIB. El cáncer:
    • Se diseminó hacia la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica; o
    • Está en la capa interna (mucosa) y se puede haber diseminado hacia la capa media (muscular) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 1 o 2 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor.

Estadio III del adenocarcinoma de esófago

El estadio III se divide en estadio IIIA, estadio IIIB y estadio IIIC, de acuerdo con el lugar donde se diseminó el cáncer.
  • Estadio IIIA. El cáncer:
    • Está en la capa interna (mucosa) y se puede haber diseminado hacia la capa media (muscular) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 3 a 6 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor; o
    • Se diseminó hacia la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 1 o 2 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor; o
    • Se diseminó hacia el diafragma, la bolsa que rodea el corazón, el tejido que cubre los pulmones y reviste la pared interna de la cavidad torácica. Se puede extirpar el cáncer mediante cirugía.
  • Estadio IIIB. El cáncer se diseminó hacia la capa externa (tejido conjuntivo) de la pared esofágica. Se encuentra cáncer en 3 a 6 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor.
  • Estadio IIIC. El cáncer se diseminó:
    • Hacia el diafragma, la bolsa que rodea el corazón o el tejido que cubre los pulmones y reviste la pared interna de la cavidad torácica; el cáncer se puede extirpar mediante cirugía. Se encuentra cáncer en 1 a 6 ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor; o
    • Hacia órganos cercanos, como la aorta, la tráquea o la espina vertebral, y el cáncer no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía; o
    • Hasta siete o más ganglios linfáticos cercanos al tumor.

Estadio IV del adenocarcinoma de esófago

En el estadio IV, el cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de cáncer de esófago. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos demuestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Durante el tratamiento del cáncer de esófago, los pacientes tienen necesidades nutricionales especiales. Muchas personas con cáncer de esófago les resulta difícil comer debido a los problemas que tienen para tragar. El esófago puede estar más angosto debido al tumor o como un efecto secundario del tratamiento. Algunos pacientes pueden recibir nutrientes directamente a través de una vena. Otros, pueden necesitar una sonda para alimentarse (un tubo plástico, flexible que se introduce por la nariz o la boca hacia el estómago) hasta que puedan comer por sí mismos. Visite nuestra página sobre cuidado nutricional.

Se usan seis tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia
  • Terapia con quimiorradiación
  • Terapia láser
  • Electrocoagulación

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La cirugía es el tratamiento más común para el cáncer de esófago. Parte del esófago se puede extirpar en una operación que se llama esofagectomía.

El médico conectará la parte sana del esófago con el estómago de manera que el paciente todavía pueda tragar. Se puede utilizar un tubo plástico o parte del intestino para realizar la conexión. Es posible extirpar también los ganglios linfáticos cerca del esófago y observarlos al microscopio para determinar si contienen cáncer. Si el esófago está parcialmente bloqueado por el tumor, se puede colocar una cánula metálica extensible (tubo) dentro del esófago para ayudar a mantenerlo abierto.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. Para la radioterapia externa se usa una máquina afuera del cuerpo que envía la radiación hacia el cáncer. Para la radioterapia interna se utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres, que se coloca directamente en el cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y del estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Se puede introducir un tubo plástico en el esófago para mantenerlo abierto durante la radioterapia. Esto se llama intubación y dilatación intraluminal.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer en el que se usan medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por boca o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La forma de administración de la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Terapia con quimiorradiación

La quimiorradioterapia combina la quimioterapia y la radioterapia para aumentar los efectos de ambas.

Terapia láser

La terapia láser es un tratamiento de cáncer en el que se usa un haz de rayo láser (haz angosto de luz intensa) para destruir células cancerosas.

Electrocoagulación

La electrocoagulación es el uso de una corriente eléctrica para destruir células cancerosas.

Ensayos clínicos

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información en inglés sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Douglas G. Adler, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 213-9797
Redwood Health Center (801) 213-9797
University Hospital (801) 213-9797

Specialties: Biliary Cancer, Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), Endoscopic Ultrasound, Endoscopy, Esophageal Diseases, Gastroenterology, Pancreatic Cancer, Therapeutic Endoscopy

John C. Fang, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 213-9797
Redwood Health Center (801) 213-9797
University Hospital (801) 213-9797
University Hospital (801) 213-9797

Specialties: Barrett's Esophagus, Endoscopy, Enteral Nutrition, Esophageal Diseases, GI Motility, Gastroenterology, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Therapeutic Endoscopy

Robert E. Glasgow, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-6035
University Hospital (801) 585-6035

Specialties: Acute Care Surgery, Barrett's Esophagus, Colorectal Surgery, Endocrine Surgery (Adrenal, Thyroid, Parathyroid), Esophageal Diseases, Esophageal Surgery, GI Motility, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Kathryn A. Peterson, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 213-9797
University Hospital (801) 213-9797

Specialties: Barrett's Esophagus, Endoscopy, Esophageal Diseases, GI Motility, Gastroenterology, Inflammatory Bowel Disease/Crohn's/Ulcerative Colitis, Women's GI Health

Eric T. Volckmann, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 587-3660
University Hospital (801) 587-3856

Specialties: Bariatric Surgery, Barrett's Esophagus, Endocrine Surgery (Adrenal, Thyroid, Parathyroid), Esophageal Diseases, GI Motility, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

kevin walker make an appointmentGastrointestinal Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Christy Steele
Phone: 801-587-4422
E-mail: christy.steele@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • In the United States, men are more than three times as likely as women to develop esophageal cancer.
  • Early esophageal cancer may not cause symptoms.
  • Dietitians and speech pathologists at Huntsman Cancer Institute work closely with esophageal cancer patients who may have trouble eating or swallowing.
clc graphic right column