Gallbladder Cancer

gallbladder and bile duct passage

Gallbladder cancer is a rare disease in which malignant (cancer) cells are found in the tissues of the gallbladder. The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that lies just under the liver in the upper abdomen. The gallbladder stores bile, a fluid made by the liver to digest fat. When food is being broken down in the stomach and intestines, bile is released from the gallbladder through a tube called the common bile duct, which connects the gallbladder and liver to the first part of the small intestine.

The wall of the gallbladder has 3 main layers of tissue.

  • Mucosal (inner) layer.
  • Muscularis (middle, muscle) layer.
  • Serosal (outer) layer.

Between these layers is supporting connective tissue. Primary gallbladder cancer starts in the inner layer and spreads through the outer layers as it grows.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for gallbladder cancer include the following:

  • Being female.
  • Being Native American.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by gallbladder cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes).
  • Pain above the stomach.
  • Fever.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Bloating.
  • Lumps in the abdomen.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Gallbladder cancer is difficult to detect and diagnose for the following reasons:

  • There are no signs or symptoms in the early stages of gallbladder cancer.
  • The symptoms of gallbladder cancer, when present, are like the symptoms of many other illnesses.
  • The gallbladder is hidden behind the liver.

Gallbladder cancer is sometimes found when the gallbladder is removed for other reasons. Patients with gallstones rarely develop gallbladder cancer.

Tests that examine the gallbladder and nearby organs are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage gallbladder cancer.

Procedures that make pictures of the gallbladder and the area around it help diagnose gallbladder cancer and show how far the cancer has spread. The process used to find out if cancer cells have spread within and around the gallbladder is called staging.

In order to plan treatment, it is important to know if the gallbladder cancer can be removed by surgery. Tests and procedures to detect, diagnose, and stage gallbladder cancer are usually done at the same time. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Liver function tests: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by the liver. A higher than normal amount of a substance can be a sign of liver disease that may be caused by gallbladder cancer.
  • Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) assay: A test that measures the level of CEA in the blood. CEA is released into the bloodstream from both cancer cells and normal cells. When found in higher than normal amounts, it can be a sign of gallbladder cancer or other conditions.
  • CA 19-9 assay: A test that measures the level of CA 19-9 in the blood. CA 19-9 is released into the bloodstream from both cancer cells and normal cells. When found in higher than normal amounts, it can be a sign of gallbladder cancer or other conditions.
  • Blood chemistry studies: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. An unusual (higher or lower than normal) amount of a substance can be a sign of disease in the organ or tissue that makes it.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. An abdominal ultrasound is done to diagnose gallbladder cancer.
  • PTC (percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography): A procedure used to x-ray the liver and bile ducts. A thin needle is inserted through the skin below the ribs and into the liver. Dye is injected into the liver or bile ducts and an x-ray is taken. If a blockage is found, a thin, flexible tube called a stent is sometimes left in the liver to drain bile into the small intestine or a collection bag outside the body.
  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography): A procedure used to x-ray the ducts (tubes) that carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder and from the gallbladder to the small intestine. Sometimes gallbladder cancer causes these ducts to narrow and block or slow the flow of bile, causing jaundice. An endoscope (a thin, lighted tube) is passed through the mouth, esophagus, and stomach into the first part of the small intestine. A catheter (a smaller tube) is then inserted through the endoscope into the bile ducts. A dye is injected through the catheter into the ducts and an x-ray is taken. If the ducts are blocked by a tumor, a fine tube may be inserted into the duct to unblock it. This tube (or stent) may be left in place to keep the duct open. Tissue samples may also be taken.
  • Laparoscopy: A surgical procedure to look at the organs inside the abdomen to check for signs of disease. Small incisions (cuts) are made in the wall of the abdomen and a laparoscope (a thin, lighted tube) is inserted into one of the incisions. Other instruments may be inserted through the same or other incisions to perform procedures such as removing organs or taking tissue samples for biopsy. The laparoscopy helps to find out if the cancer is within the gallbladder only or has spread to nearby tissues and if it can be removed by surgery.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. The biopsy may be done after surgery to remove the tumor. If the tumor clearly cannot be removed by surgery, the biopsy may be done using a fine needle to remove cells from the tumor.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

Tests and procedures to stage gallbladder cancer are usually done at the same time as diagnosis.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if gallbladder cancer spreads to the liver, the cancer cells in the liver are actually gallbladder cancer cells. The disease is metastatic gallbladder cancer, not liver cancer.

The following stages are used for gallbladder cancer:

Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the inner (mucosal) layer of the gallbladder. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ.

Stage I

In stage I, cancer has formed and has spread beyond the inner (mucosal) layer to a layer of tissue with blood vessels or to the muscle layer.

Stage II

In stage II, cancer has spread beyond the muscle layer to the connective tissue around the muscle.

Stage IIIA

In stage IIIA, cancer has spread through the thin layers of tissue that cover the gallbladder and/or to the liver and/or to one nearby organ (such as the stomach, small intestine, colon, pancreas, or bile ducts outside the liver).

Stage IIIB

In stage IIIB, cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and:

  • beyond the inner layer of the gallbladder to a layer of tissue with blood vessels or to the muscle layer; or
  • beyond the muscle layer to the connective tissue around the muscle; or
  • through the thin layers of tissue that cover the gallbladder and/or to the liver and/or to one nearby organ (such as the stomach, small intestine, colon, pancreas, or bile ducts outside the liver).

Stage IVA

In stage IVA, cancer has spread to a main blood vessel of the liver or to 2 or more nearby organs or areas other than the liver. Cancer may have spread to nearby lymph nodes.

Stage IVB

In stage IVB, cancer has spread to either:

  • lymph nodes along large arteries in the abdomen and/or near the lower part of the backbone; or
  • to organs or areas far away from the gallbladder.

For gallbladder cancer, stages are also grouped according to how the cancer may be treated. There are two treatment groups:

Localized (Stage I)

Cancer is found in the wall of the gallbladder and can be completely removed by surgery.

Unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic (Stage II, Stage III, and Stage IV)

Unresectable cancer cannot be removed completely by surgery. Most patients with gallbladder cancer have unresectable cancer.

Recurrent cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. Gallbladder cancer may come back in the gallbladder or in other parts of the body.

Metastasis is the spread of cancer from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body. Metastatic gallbladder cancer may spread to surrounding tissues, organs, throughout the abdominal cavity, or to distant parts of the body.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, gallbladder cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including surgeons, medical oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with medicine, radiation oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with radiation), gastroenterologists (doctors who treat diseases of the digestive system), nurses, dietitians, and social workers.

Different types of treatments are available for patients with gallbladder cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Three types standard treatments are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Gallbladder cancer may be treated with a cholecystectomy, surgery to remove the gallbladder and some of the tissues around it. Nearby lymph nodes may be removed. A laparoscope is sometimes used to guide gallbladder surgery. The laparoscope is attached to a video camera and inserted through an incision (port) in the abdomen. Surgical instruments are inserted through other ports to perform the surgery. Because there is a risk that gallbladder cancer cells may spread to these ports, tissue surrounding the port sites may also be removed.

If the cancer has spread and cannot be removed, the following types of palliative surgery may relieve symptoms:

  • Surgical biliary bypass: If the tumor is blocking the small intestine and bile is building up in the gallbladder, a biliary bypass may be done. During this operation, the gallbladder or bile duct will be cut and sewn to the small intestine to create a new pathway around the blocked area.
  • Endoscopic stent placement: If the tumor is blocking the bile duct, surgery may be done to put in a stent (a thin, flexible tube) to drain bile that has built up in the area. The stent may be placed through a catheter that drains to the outside of the body or the stent may go around the blocked area and drain the bile into the small intestine.
  • Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: A procedure done to drain bile when there is a blockage and endoscopic stent placement is not possible. An x-ray of the liver and bile ducts is done to locate the blockage. Images made by ultrasound are used to guide placement of a stent, which is left in the liver to drain bile into the small intestine or a collection bag outside the body. This procedure may be done to relieve jaundice before surgery.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping the cells from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Clinical trials

This section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Radiation sensitizers - Clinical trials are studying ways to improve the effect of radiation therapy on tumor cells, including the following:

  • Hyperthermia therapy: A treatment in which body tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill cancer cells or to make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation therapy and certain anticancer drugs.
  • Radiosensitizers: Drugs that make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Giving radiation therapy together with radiosensitizers may kill more tumor cells.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, work, or normal daily life.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and over 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout or talk one-on-one with cancer information specialists.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website April 2014

El cáncer de vesícula biliar es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la vesícula biliar.

El cáncer de vesícula biliar es una enfermedad poco frecuente por la que se encuentran células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la vesícula biliar. La vesícula biliar es un órgano en forma de pera situado por debajo del hígado, en la parte superior del abdomen. Almacena la bilis, un líquido que elabora el hígado a fin de digerir la grasa. Cuando los alimentos se descomponen en el estómago y los intestinos, la vesícula biliar libera bilis a través de un tubo que se llama conducto biliar común, que conecta la vesícula biliar y el hígado a la primera parte del intestino delgado.

La pared de la vesícula biliar tiene tres capas principales de tejido:

  • Capa de mucosa (interna).
  • Capa muscularis (media, muscular).
  • Capa Serosa (externa).

Entre estas capas se encuentra tejido conjuntivo de sostén. El cáncer de vesícula biliar primario comienza en la capa interna y se disemina a través de las capas externas mientras crece.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta la posibilidad de tener una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a tener cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se va a presentar un cáncer. Consulte con su médico si piensa que está en riesgo. Los factores de riesgo para el cáncer de vesícula biliar incluyen los siguientes aspectos:

  • Ser mujer.
  • Ser indio estadounidense.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de vesícula biliar u otras afecciones puede causar estos y otros signos y síntomas. Consulte con su médico si presenta cualquiera de los siguientes problemas:

  • Ictericia (la piel y el blanco de los ojos se tornan amarillentos).
  • Dolor en la boca del estómago.
  • Fiebre.
  • Náuseas y vómitos.
  • Flatulencia.
  • Nódulos en el abdomen.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

El cáncer de vesícula biliar es difícil de detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar temprano por las siguientes razones:

  • No hay signos o síntomas en los primeros estadios del cáncer de vesícula biliar.
  • Los síntomas del cáncer de vesícula biliar, cuando están presentes, se parecen a los síntomas de muchas otras enfermedades.
  • La vesícula biliar está oculta detrás del hígado.

El cáncer de vesícula biliar se suele encontrar cuando se extirpa la vesícula biliar por otras razones. Los pacientes con cálculos biliares presentan rara vez un cáncer de vesícula biliar.

Para detectar (encontrar), diagnosticar y estadificar el cáncer de vesícula biliar, se utilizan pruebas que examinan la vesícula biliar y los órganos cercanos.

Los procedimientos para obtener imágenes de la vesícula biliar y el área circundante ayudan a diagnosticar el cáncer de vesícula biliar y muestran el grado de diseminación del cáncer. El proceso que se utiliza para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron adentro de la vesícula biliar y a su alrededor se llama estadificación.

Para planificar el tratamiento, es importante saber si el cáncer de vesícula biliar se puede extirpar mediante cirugía. Las pruebas y los procedimientos para detectar, diagnosticar y estadificar el cáncer de vesícula biliar se suelen realizar al mismo tiempo. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para verificar los signos generales de salud, incluso la verificación de signos de enfermedad, como nódulos o cualquier otra cosa que no parezca habitual. También se toma nota de los hábitos de salud del paciente, y las enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores.
  • Pruebas de la función hepática: procedimiento mediante el cual se analiza una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias que el hígado libera a la sangre. Una cantidad más alta que la normal de una sustancia puede ser un signo de enfermedad hepática que se puede deber a un cáncer de vesícula biliar.
  • Ensayo del antígeno carcinoembrionario (ACE): prueba que mide la concentración del ACE en la sangre. Las células cancerosas y las células normales liberan ACE al torrente sanguíneo. Cuando se encuentra en cantidades más altas que las normales, esto puede ser un signo de cáncer de vesícula biliar o de otras afecciones.
  • Ensayo de CA 19-9: prueba que mide la concentración del CA 19-9 en la sangre. Las células cancerosas y las células normales liberan CA 19-9 se libera al torrente sanguíneo. Cuando se encuentra en cantidades más altas que las normales, puede ser un signo de cáncer de vesícula biliar o de otras afecciones.
  • Estudios químicos de la sangre: procedimiento mediante el cual se analiza una muestra de sangre para medir las concentraciones de ciertas sustancias liberadas por los órganos y tejidos al cuerpo. Una cantidad no habitual (mayor o menor a la normal) de una sustancia puede ser signo de enfermedad en el órgano o tejido que la elabora.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, como el pecho, abdomen y pelvis, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se traga para que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento durante el que se hacen rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasónicas) en los tejidos u órganos internos y se crean ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos del cuerpo que se llama ecograma. Para diagnosticar el cáncer de vesícula biliar, se realiza una ecografía abdominal.
  • CTP (colangiografía transhepática percutánea): procedimiento que se utiliza para tomar una radiografía del hígado y los conductos biliares. Se introduce una aguja fina a través de la piel por debajo de las costillas hasta el hígado. Se inyecta un tinte en el hígado o los conductos biliares y se toma una radiografía. Si se encuentra un bloqueo, a veces se deja en el hígado una sonda delgada y flexible llamada endoprótesis a fin de drenar la bilis hacia el intestino delgado o una bolsa de recolección fuera del cuerpo.
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y los huesos del interior del tórax. una radiografía es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra imágenes de las áreas interiores del cuerpo.
  • CPRE (colangiopancreatografía retrógrada endoscópica): procedimiento que se utiliza para tomar radiografías de los conductos (tubos) que transportan bilis desde el hígado a la vesícula biliar y desde la vesícula biliar al intestino delgado. En algunas ocasiones, el cáncer de vesícula biliar reduce la abertura de estos conductos y bloquea o reduce el flujo de bilis, con lo cual se produce ictericia. Se introduce un endoscopio (un tubo delgado con iluminación) por la boca, el esófago y el estómago hasta la primera parte del intestino delgado. Luego se introduce un catéter (una sonda más pequeña) a través del endoscopio hasta los conductos biliares. Se inyecta un tinte a través del catéter hacia los conductos biliares y se toma una radiografía. Si los conductos están bloqueados por un tumor, se puede introducir una sonda delgada en el conducto para desbloquearlo. Se puede dejar colocada esta sonda (o endoprótesis) para conservar abierto el conducto. También se pueden tomar muestras de tejido.
  • Laparoscopia: procedimiento quirúrgico para observar los órganos adentro del abdomen para determinar si hay signos de enfermedad. Se realizan pequeñas incisiones (cortes) en la pared abdominal y se introduce un laparoscopio (un tubo delgado con iluminación) en el abdomen. Se pueden introducir otros instrumentos a través de las mismas u otras incisiones para realizar procedimientos como la extirpación de órganos o la extracción de muestras de tejido para una biopsia. La laparoscopia ayuda a descubrir si el cáncer se encuentra adentro de la vesícula biliar solamente o si se diseminó hasta tejidos cercanos y si se puede extirpar mediante cirugía.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo pueda observarlos bajo un microscopio y determinar si hay signos de cáncer. La biopsia se puede realizar después de la cirugía para extirpar el tumor. Si es evidente que el tumor no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía, se realiza la biopsia con una aguja fina para extraer células del tumor.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Las pruebas y los procedimientos para estadificar el cáncer de vesícula biliar se suelen realizar al mismo tiempo que el diagnóstico.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de vesícula biliar se disemina al hígado, las células cancerosas en el hígado son, en realidad, células de cáncer de vesícula biliar. La enfermedad es cáncer de vesícula biliar metastásico, no cáncer de hígado.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el cáncer de vesícula biliar:

Estadio 0 (carcinoma in situ)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en el revestimiento interno (capa de mucosa) de la vesícula biliar. Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse hasta el tejido cercano normal. El estadio 0 también se llama carcinoma in situ.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se formó y se diseminó más allá de la capa interna (mucosa) hasta la capa de tejido con vasos sanguíneos o la capa muscular.

Estadio II

En el estadio II, el cáncer se diseminó más allá de la capa muscular hasta el tejido conjuntivo que rodea el músculo.

Estadio IIIA

En el estadio IIIA, el cáncer se diseminó a través de las capas delgadas de tejido que cubren la vesícula biliar o hasta el hígado, o hasta un órgano cercano (como el estómago, el intestino delgado, el colon, el páncreas o los conductos biliares fuera del hígado).\

Estadio IIIB

En el estadio IIIB, el cáncer se diseminó hasta ganglios linfáticos cercanos y hasta alguno de los siguientes sitios:

  • Más allá de la capa interna de la vesícula biliar hasta la capa de tejido con vasos sanguíneos o hasta la capa muscular; o
  • Más allá de la capa muscular hasta el tejido conjuntivo que rodea el músculo; o
  • A través de las capas delgadas de tejido que cubren la vesícula biliar o hasta el hígado o un órgano cercano (como el estómago, el intestino delgado, el colon, el páncreas o los conductos biliares fuera del hígado).

Estadio IVA

En el estadio IVA, el cáncer se diseminó hasta el vaso sanguíneo principal del hígado o hasta dos o más órganos o áreas cercanas distintas al hígado. El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos cercanos.

Estadio IVB

En el estadio IVB, el cáncer se diseminó hasta alguno de los siguientes sitios:

  • Los ganglios linfáticos a lo largo de las arterias del abdomen o cerca de la parte baja de la espina dorsal; o
  • Los órganos o áreas muy alejadas de la vesícula biliar.

En el caso del cáncer de vesícula biliar, los estadios se agrupan también de acuerdo con la forma de tratamiento. Hay dos grupos de tratamiento:

Localizado (estadio I)

El cáncer se encuentra en la pared de la vesícula biliar y se puede extirpar completamente mediante cirugía.

Irresecable, recidivante o metastásico (estadio II, estadio III y estadio IV)

El cáncer en no se puede extirpar completamente mediante cirugía. La mayoría de los pacientes de cáncer de vesícula biliar tienen un cáncer irresecable.

El cáncer recidivante es un cáncer que recidivó (volvió) después de haber sido tratado. El cáncer de vesícula biliar puede volver a la vesícula biliar o a otras partes del cuerpo.

Una metástasis es la diseminación del cáncer desde el sitio primario (donde empezó) hasta otras partes del cuerpo. El cáncer de vesícula biliar metastásico su puede diseminar hasta los tejidos que lo rodean, órganos, por toda la cavidad abdominal o hasta partes distantes del cuerpo.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes con cáncer de vesícula biliar. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan tres tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

El cáncer de vesícula biliar se puede tratar con una colecistectomía, cirugía para extirpar la vesícula biliar y algunos de los tejidos que la rodean. Se pueden extirpar los ganglios linfáticos cercanos. En algunos casos, se utiliza un laparoscopio para guiar la cirugía de la vesícula biliar. Se conecta el laparoscopio con una cámara de video y este se introduce a través de una incisión (puerto) en el abdomen. Se introducen instrumentos quirúrgicos a través de otros puertos para realizar la cirugía. Dado que existe el riesgo de que las células cancerosas de la vesícula biliar se diseminen hasta estos puertos, el tejido en torno a los sitios de los puertos también se puede extirpar.

Si el cáncer se diseminó y no es posible extirparlo, se utilizan los siguientes tipos de cirugía paliativa para aliviar los síntomas:

  • Derivación biliar quirúrgica: si el tumor bloquea el intestino delgado y la bilis se está acumulando en la vesícula biliar, se realiza una derivación biliar. Durante esta operación, se hace un corte en la vesícula biliar o el conducto biliar y se cosen al intestino delgado para crear una vía nueva alrededor del área bloqueada.
  • Colocación de cánula endoscópica: si el tumor bloquea el conducto biliar, se puede realizar una cirugía para colocar una cánula (tubo delgado flexible) para drenar la bilis que se ha acumulado en esta área. La cánula se coloca a través de un catéter que drena fuera del cuerpo o la cánula puede pasar alrededor del área bloqueada y drenar la bilis en el intestino delgado.
  • Drenaje biliar transhepático percutáneo: procedimiento que se realiza para drenar la bilis cuando hay un bloqueo y no es posible colocar una cánula endoscópica. Se toma una radiografía del hígado y de los conductos biliares para localizar el bloqueo. Las imágenes obtenidas mediante una ecografía se utilizan para guiar la colocación de una cánula que se deja en el hígado para drenar la bilis hacia el intestino delgado o hacia una bolsa de recolección fuera del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se realiza para aliviar la ictericia antes de la cirugía.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer en el que se utilizan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo para enviar la radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres que se colocan directamente en el cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, mediante su destrucción o evitando su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra por vía oral o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas quimioterapia regional). La forma de administración de la quimioterapia depende del tipo y del estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Ensayos clínicos

En la presente sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos, pero tal vez no se mencionen todos los tratamientos nuevos que se están considerando. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

En los ensayos clínicos se están estudiando nuevas formas de mejorar el efecto de la radioterapia en las células tumorales; entre ellas, las siguientes:

  • Terapia de hipertermia: tratamiento para el que se expone el tejido del cuerpo a temperaturas altas para dañar y destruir células cancerosas o para que las células cancerosas se vuelvan más sensibles a los efectos de la radioterapia y a ciertos medicamentos contra el cáncer.
  • Radiosensibilizadores: medicamentos que aumentan la sensibilidad de las células tumorales a la radioterapia. La administración de radioterapia junto con radiosensibilizadores puede destruir más células tumorales.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Paul J. Campsen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-2708
University Hospital (801) 585-2708
University Hospital (801) 581-2634

Specialties: Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Kidney Transplant, Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Transplant, Pancreas Transplant, Renal Transplantation, Surgery, General

Robert E. Glasgow, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-6035
University Hospital (801) 585-6035

Specialties: Acute Care Surgery, Barrett's Esophagus, Colorectal Surgery, Endocrine Surgery (Adrenal, Thyroid, Parathyroid), Esophageal Diseases, Esophageal Surgery, GI Motility, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Ying J. Hitchcock, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Gastrointestinal Cancers, Head and Neck Cancers, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Robin D. Kim, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-6140
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 585-6140
University Hospital (801) 585-6320

Specialties: Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Kidney Transplant, Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Transplant, Pancreas Transplant, Surgery, General, Transplant Surgery

Sean J. Mulvihill, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 581-7167

Specialties: Biliary Cancer, Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Laparoscopy, Liver Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Surgery, General

N. Jewel Samadder, M.Sc., M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-9797
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-9797

Specialties: Clinical Genetics, Colon Cancer, Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Pancreatic Cancer

Courtney L. Scaife, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-6911

Specialties: Colorectal Surgery, Esophageal Surgery, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oncology Surgery, Pancreatic Cancer, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Dennis C. Shrieve, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Genitourinary Cancers, Lung Cancer, Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Prostate Cancer, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Jonathan D. Tward, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4320

Specialties: Bladder Cancer, Brachytherapy, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Genitourinary Cancers, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Lymphomas, Penile Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Radiation Oncology, Robotic Prostatectomy, Seed Implants, Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), Urologic Oncology

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

kevin walker make an appointmentGastrointestinal Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Christy Steele
Phone: 801-587-4422
E-mail: christy.steele@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Being female can increase the risk of developing gallbladder cancer.
  • Possible signs of gallbladder cancer include jaundice, pain, and fever.
  • Stages of gallbladder cancer are grouped according to how the cancer may be treated: localized (resectable) or unresectable.
clc graphic right column