Liver Cancer

liver and bile duct passage

The liver is one of the largest organs in the body. It has four lobes and fills the upper right side of the abdomen inside the rib cage. Three of the many important functions of the liver are:

  • To filter harmful substances from the blood so they can be passed from the body in stools and urine.
  • To make bile to help digest fat that comes from food.
  • To store glycogen (sugar), which the body uses for energy.

The two types of adult primary liver cancer are:

  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Cholangiocarcinoma

The most common type of adult primary liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma.

This section discusses the treatment of primary liver cancer (cancer that begins in the liver). Treatment of cancer that begins in other parts of the body and spreads to the liver is not discussed.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support


ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. The following are risk factors for adult primary liver cancer:

  • Having hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Having both hepatitis B and hepatitis C increases the risk even more.
  • Having a close relative with both hepatitis and liver cancer.
  • Having cirrhosis, which can be caused by:
    • Hepatitis (especially hepatitis C).
    • Drinking large amounts of alcohol for many years or being an alcoholic.
  • Eating foods tainted with aflatoxin (poison from a fungus that can grow on foods, such as grains and nuts, that have not been stored properly).
  • Having hemochromatosis, a condition in which the body takes up and stores more iron than it needs. The extra iron is stored in the liver, heart, and pancreas.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by adult primary liver cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • A hard lump on the right side just below the rib cage
  • Discomfort in the upper abdomen on the right side
  • A swollen abdomen
  • Pain near the right shoulder blade or in the back
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes)
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Unusual tiredness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss for no known reason

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the liver and the blood are used to detect (find) and diagnose adult primary liver cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Serum tumor marker test: A procedure in which a sample of blood is examined to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs, tissues, or tumor cells in the body. Certain substances are linked to specific types of cancer when found in increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers. An increased level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in the blood may be a sign of liver cancer. Other cancers and certain noncancerous conditions, including cirrhosis and hepatitis, may also increase AFP levels. Sometimes the AFP level is normal even when there is liver cancer.
  • Liver function tests: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by the liver. A higher than normal amount of a substance can be a sign of liver cancer.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the abdomen, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. A spiral or helical CT scan makes a series of very detailed pictures of areas inside the body using an x-ray machine that scans the body in a spiral path.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the liver. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). To create detailed pictures of blood vessels in and near the liver, dye is injected into a vein. This procedure is called MRA (magnetic resonance angiography).
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. The picture can be printed to be looked at later.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. Procedures used to collect the sample of cells or tissues include the following:
    • Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: The removal of cells, tissue or fluid using a thin needle.
    • Core needle biopsy: The removal of cells or tissue using a slightly wider needle.
    • Laparoscopy: A surgical procedure to look at the organs inside the abdomen to check for signs of disease. Small incisions (cuts) are made in the wall of the abdomen and a laparoscope (a thin, lighted tube) is inserted into one of the incisions. Another instrument is inserted through the same or another incision to remove the tissue samples.

A biopsy is not always needed to diagnose adult primary liver cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After adult primary liver cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the liver or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the liver or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body. When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis . Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if primary liver cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually liver cancer cells. The disease is metastatic liver cancer, not lung cancer.

There are several staging systems for liver cancer. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) Staging System is widely used and is described below. This system is used to predict the patient's chance of recovery and to plan treatment, based on the following:

  • Whether the cancer has spread within the liver or to other parts of the body.
  • How well the liver is working.
  • The general health and wellness of the patient.
  • The symptoms caused by the cancer.

The BCLC staging system has five stages:

  • Stage 0: Very early
  • Stage A: Early
  • Stage B: Intermediate
  • Stage C: Advanced
  • Stage D: End-stage

The following groups are used to plan treatment.

BCLC stages 0, A, and B

Treatment to cure the cancer is given for BCLC stages 0, A, and B.

BCLC stages C and D

Treatment to relieve the symptoms caused by liver cancer and improve the patient's quality of life is given for BCLC stages C and D. Treatments are not likely to cure the cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, liver cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including gastroenterologists (doctors who specialize in treating problems of the digestive organs), surgeons, medical oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with medicine), radiation oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with radiation), nurses, dietitians, and social workers.

Different types of treatments are available for patients with adult primary liver cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Six standard treatments are used:

New treatments are being studied in clinical trials.

Surgery

A partial hepatectomy (surgery to remove the part of the liver where cancer is found) may be done. A wedge of tissue, an entire lobe, or a larger portion of the liver, along with some of the healthy tissue around it is removed. The remaining liver tissue takes over the functions of the liver and may regrow.

Liver transplant

In a liver transplant, the entire liver is removed and replaced with a healthy donated liver. A liver transplant may be done when the disease is in the liver only and a donated liver can be found. If the patient has to wait for a donated liver, other treatment is given as needed.

Ablation therapy

Ablation therapy removes or destroys tissue. Different types of ablation therapy are used for liver cancer:

  • Radiofrequency ablation: The use of special needles that are inserted directly through the skin or through an incision in the abdomen to reach the tumor. High-energy radio waves heat the needles and tumor which kills cancer cells.
  • Microwave therapy: A type of treatment in which the tumor is exposed to high temperatures created by microwaves. This can damage and kill cancer cells or make them more sensitive to the effects of radiation and certain anticancer drugs.
  • Percutaneous ethanol injection: A cancer treatment in which a small needle is used to inject ethanol (pure alcohol) directly into a tumor to kill cancer cells. Several treatments may be needed. Usually local anesthesia is used, but if the patient has many tumors in the liver, general anesthesia may be used.
  • Cryoablation: A treatment that uses an instrument to freeze and destroy cancer cells. This type of treatment is also called cryotherapy and cryosurgery. The doctor may use ultrasound to guide the instrument.
  • Electroporation therapy: A treatment that sends electrical pulses through an electrode placed in a tumor to kill cancer cells.

Embolization therapy

Embolization therapy is the use of substances to block or decrease the flow of blood through the hepatic artery to the tumor. When the tumor does not get the oxygen and nutrients it needs, it will not continue to grow. Embolization therapy is used for patients who cannot have surgery to remove the tumor or ablation therapy and whose tumor has not spread outside the liver.

The liver receives blood from the hepatic portal vein and the hepatic artery. Blood that comes into the liver from the hepatic portal vein usually goes to the healthy liver tissue. Blood that comes from the hepatic artery usually goes to the tumor. When the hepatic artery is blocked during embolization therapy, the healthy liver tissue continues to receive blood from the hepatic portal vein.

There are two main types of embolization therapy:

  • Transarterial embolization (TAE): A small incision (cut) is made in the inner thigh and a catheter (thin, flexible tube) is inserted and threaded up into the hepatic artery. Once the catheter is in place, a substance that blocks the hepatic artery and stops blood flow to the tumor is injected.
  • Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE): This procedure is like TAE except an anticancer drug is also given. The procedure can be done by attaching the anticancer drug to small beads that are injected into the hepatic artery or by injecting the anticancer drug through the catheter into the hepatic artery and then injecting the substance to block the hepatic artery. Most of the anticancer drug is trapped near the tumor and only a small amount of the drug reaches other parts of the body. This type of treatment is also called chemoembolization.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Adult liver cancer may be treated with a targeted therapy drug that stops cells from dividing and prevents the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. Radiation therapy is given in different ways:

  • External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer.
    • 3-D conformal radiation therapy uses a computer to create a 3-dimensional picture of the tumor. This allows doctors to give the highest possible dose of radiation to the tumor, while preventing damage to normal tissue as much as possible. This type of radiation therapy is being studied in clinical trials.
    • Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation directly to the tumors. The total dose of radiation is divided into smaller doses given over several days. This type of radiation therapy helps prevent damage to normal tissue. This type of radiation therapy is being studied in clinical trials.
    • Proton-beam radiation therapy is a type of high-energy radiation therapy that uses streams of protons (small, positively-charged particles of matter) to kill tumor cells. This type of radiation therapy is being studied in clinical trials.

Clinical trials

These studies discover and evaluate new and improved cancer treatments. Patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors about participating in a clinical trial or any questions regarding research studies. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to HCI patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

 

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer primario de hígado en adultos es una enfermedad por la cual se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos del hígado.

El hígado es uno de los órganos más grandes del cuerpo. Tiene cuatro lóbulos y ocupa la sección superior derecha del abdomen adentro de la caja torácica. Las siguientes son tres de las diversas funciones del hígado:

  • Filtrar sustancias dañinas en la sangre para que puedan ser transportadas desde el cuerpo hasta la materia fecal y la orina.
  • Producir bilis para ayudar a la digestión de las grasas de los alimentos.
  • Almacenar glicógeno (azúcar) que el cuerpo usa para obtener energía.

Hay dos tipos de cáncer primario de hígado en adultos:

  • Carcinoma hepatocelular.
  • Colangiocarcinoma.

El tipo más común de cáncer primario de hígado en adultos es el carcinoma hepatocelular.

Este sumario hace referencia al tratamiento del cáncer primario de hígado en adultos (cáncer que comienza en el hígado). El tratamiento del cáncer que comienza en otras partes del cuerpo y se disemina al hígado no se incluye en este sumario.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta el riesgo de padecer de una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se padecerá de cáncer; no tener un factor de riesgo no significa que no se padecerá de cáncer. Consulte con su médico si piensa que puede estar en riesgo. Los siguientes son los factores de riesgo del cáncer primario de hígado en adultos:

  • Presentar hepatitis B o hepatitis C. El riesgo aumenta aún más si tiene ambas.
  • Tener un familiar cercano con hepatitis y cáncer de hígado.
  • Tener cirrosis, que puede obedecer a lo siguiente:
    • Hepatitis (en particular, hepatitis C).
    • Consumo por muchos años de grandes cantidades de alcohol o haber sido alcohólico durante muchos años.
  • Consumir alimentos contaminados con aflatoxina (veneno de un hongo que puede crecer en alimentos, como granos y frutos secos, que no se almacenan correctamente).
  • Tener hemocromatosis, una afección en la que el cuerpo absorbe y almacena más hierro del que necesita. El hierro adicional se almacena en el hígado, el corazón y el páncreas.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Estos y otros signos y síntomas se pueden presentar por un cáncer primario de hígado en adultos u otras afecciones. Consulte con su médico si presenta cualquiera de los siguientes puntos:

  • Una masa dura en el costado derecho justo debajo de la cavidad torácica.
  • Malestar en la parte superior y derecha del abdomen.
  • Hinchazón en el abdomen.
  • Dolor cerca del omóplato derecho o en la espalda.
  • Ictericia (color amarillento de la piel y la parte blanca de los ojos).
  • Moretones o sangrado fáciles.
  • Cansancio inusual.
  • Náuseas y vómitos.
  • Pérdida del apetito.
  • Pérdida de peso sin razón conocida.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer primario de hígado en adultos, se utilizan pruebas que examinan el hígado y la sangre. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para verificar el estado general de salud e identificar cualquier signo de enfermedad como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca inusual. También se anotan datos sobre los hábitos de salud del paciente, y las enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores.
  • Prueba sérica de marcadores tumorales: procedimiento mediante el cual se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias liberadas a la misma por los órganos, tejidos o células tumorales del cuerpo. Ciertas sustancias están relacionadas con tipos específicos de cáncer cuando se encuentran en concentraciones altas en la sangre. Estas se llaman marcadores tumorales. Un aumento en la concentración de alfafetoproteína (AFP) en la sangre puede ser un signo de cáncer de hígado. Otros cánceres y ciertas afecciones no cancerosas, como la cirrosis y la hepatitis, también pueden aumentar las concentraciones de AFP. Algunas veces, las concentraciones de AFP son normales, incluso cuando hay cáncer de hígado.
  • Pruebas de la función hepática: procedimiento para el que se analiza una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias liberadas por el hígado en la sangre. Una cantidad más alta que la normal de una sustancia puede ser un signo de cáncer de hígado.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo, como el abdomen, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar o dar de beber un tinte para ayudar a que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada. Una exploración por TC en espiral o una TC helicoidal permiten obtener una serie de imágenes muy detalladas de áreas del interior del cuerpo mediante una máquina de rayos X que explora el cuerpo en un camino en espiral.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que se utiliza un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo, como el hígado. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN). Para crear imágenes detalladas de los vasos sanguíneos del hígado o cercanos al hígado, se inyecta un tinte en una vena. Este procedimiento se llama ARM (angiografía por resonancia magnética).
  • Ecografía: procedimiento por el cual se rebotan ondas sonoras de alta energía en tejidos u órganos internos y se crean ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama ecograma. La imagen se puede imprimir y observar más tarde.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo los observe al microscopio y determine la presencia de signos de cáncer. Los siguientes son los procedimientos que se usan para recoger muestras de células o tejidos:
    • Biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina : extracción de células, tejido o líquido mediante una aguja fina.
    • Biopsia central con aguja : extracción de células o tejido mediante una aguja ligeramente más ancha.
    • Laparoscopia : procedimiento quirúrgico para observar los órganos en el interior del abdomen a fin de determinar si hay signos de enfermedad. Se realizan pequeñas incisiones (cortes) en la pared del abdomen y se introduce un laparoscopio (un tubo delgado con luz) en una de las incisiones. Se introduce otro instrumento en la misma o en otra incisión para extraer las muestras de tejido.

    No siempre es necesaria una biopsia para diagnosticar un cáncer primario de hígado en adultos.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticarse el cáncer primario de hígado en adultos, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron adentro del hígado o hacia otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso que se utiliza para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó adentro del hígado o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio a fin de planificar el tratamiento. En el proceso de estadificación se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo, como el pecho, abdomen, y la pelvis, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar un tinte en una vena o se ingiere para ayudar a que los órganos o tejidos aparezca más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que se utiliza un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Exploración por TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El explorador con TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó hasta otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de hígado se disemina hasta los pulmones, las células cancerosas en los pulmones son, de hecho, células cancerosas de cáncer de hígado. La enfermedad es cáncer de hígado metastásico, no cáncer de pulmón.

El sistema de estadificación Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer se puede usar para estadificar el cáncer primario de hígado en adultos.

Hay varios sistemas de estadificación del cáncer de hígado. El sistema de estadificación Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) se usa ampliamente y se describe a continuación. Este sistema se usa para pronosticar las probabilidades de recuperación del paciente y para planificar el tratamiento, con base en los siguientes aspectos:

  • Si el cáncer se diseminó en el hígado o a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Qué tan bien funciona el hígado.
  • La salud y el bienestar generales del paciente.
  • Los síntomas que causa el cáncer.

El sistema de estadificación BCLC tiene cinco estadios:

  • Estadio 0. Muy temprano
  • Estadio A. Temprano
  • Estadio B. Intermedio
  • Estadio C. Avanzado
  • Estadio D. Estadio terminal

Se usan los siguientes grupos para planificar el tratamiento.

Estadios 0, A y B de BCLC

En los estadios 0, A y B del BCLC, se administra tratamiento para curar el cáncer.

Estadios C y D de BCLC

En los estadios C y D, se administra tratamiento para aliviar los síntomas del cáncer de hígado y para mejorar la calidad de vida del paciente. Es probable que los tratamientos no curen el cáncer.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de cáncer primario de hígado en adultos. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan seis tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Trasplante de hígado
  • Terapia de ablación
  • Terapia de embolización
  • Terapia dirigida
  • Radioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

Se puede realizar una hepatectomía parcial (cirugía para extirpar la parte del hígado donde hay cáncer). Se extirpa una cuña de tejido, un lóbulo completo o una porción más grande del hígado junto con parte del tejido sano alrededor. El tejido restante retoma las funciones del hígado y puede volver a crecer.

Trasplante de hígado

En un trasplante de hígado, se extirpa todo el órgano y se remplaza por uno sano de un donante. Se puede realizar un trasplante de hígado cuando la enfermedad está solo en este órgano y se puede encontrar un hígado de un donante. Si el paciente tiene que esperar un hígado donado, se le administra otro tratamiento según sea necesario.

Terapia de ablación

Con la terapia de ablación, se extrae o destruye tejido. Se usan diferentes tipos de terapia de ablación para el cáncer de hígado:

  • Ablación por radiofrecuencia: uso de agujas especiales que se introducen directamente a través de la piel o de una incisión en el abdomen para alcanzar el tumor. Las ondas de radio de alta energía calientan las agujas y el tumor, lo que destruye las células cancerosas.
  • Terapia con microonda: tipo de tratamiento en el que se expone el tumor a temperaturas altas creadas por microondas. Esto puede dañar y destruir las células cancerosas o hacerlas más sensibles a los efectos de la radiación y de ciertos medicamentos contra el cáncer.
  • Inyección percutánea de etanol: tratamiento del cáncer en el que se utiliza una aguja pequeña para inyectaretanol (alcohol puro) directamente en un tumor a fin de destruir células cancerosas. Pueden ser necesarios varios tratamientos. Con frecuencia, se usa anestesia local, pero si el paciente tiene muchos tumores en el hígado, se puede usar anestesia general.
  • Crioablación: tratamiento en el que se usa un instrumento para congelar y destruir las células cancerosas. Este tipo de tratamiento también se llama crioterapia y criocirugía. El médico puede guiar el instrumento mediante ecografía.
  • Terapia de electroporación: tratamiento en el que se envían pulsos electrónicos por medio de un electrodo colocado en un tumor para destruir las células cancerosas.

Terapia de embolización

La terapia de embolización consiste en el uso de sustancias para obstruir y disminuir el flujo de sangre de la arteria hepática al tumor. Cuando el tumor no recibe el oxígeno y los nutrientes necesarios, no sigue creciendo. La terapia de embolización se usa para los pacientes que no se pueden someter a una cirugía para extirpar el tumor ni a terapia de ablación y cuyo tumor no se ha diseminado por fuera del hígado.

El hígado recibe sangre de la vena porta hepática y de la arteria hepática. La sangre que llega al hígado de la vena porta hepática, con frecuencia, se dirige al tejido sano del hígado; la sangre que llega de la arteria hepática, con frecuencia, se dirige al tumor. Cuando se obstruye la arteria hepática durante la terapia de embolización, el tejido sano del hígado continúa recibiendo sangre de la vena porta hepática.

Hay dos tipos principales de terapia de embolización:

  • Embolización transarterial (ETA): se hace una pequeña incisión (corte) en la parte interior del muslo, se introduce un catéter (tubo delgado y flexible) y se ensarta en la arteria hepática. Una vez el catéter está en su lugar, se inyecta una sustancia que obstruye la arteria hepática y detiene el flujo de sangre al tumor.
  • Quimioembolización transarterial (QETA): este procedimiento es similar a la ETA, excepto porque también se administra un medicamento contra el cáncer. El procedimiento se puede realizar al fijar el medicamento contra el cáncer a gotas pequeñas que se inyectan en la arteria hepática o al inyectarlo mediante el catéter a la arteria hepática y, luego, inyectar la sustancia para obstruir esta arteria. La mayor parte del medicamento contra el cáncer queda atrapada cerca del tumor y solo una pequeña cantidad alcanza otras partes del cuerpo. Este tipo de tratamiento también se llama quimioembolización.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tratamiento en el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales. El cáncer de hígado en adultos se puede tratar con un medicamento de terapia dirigida que impide la multiplicación de las células y evita el crecimiento de nuevos vasos sanguíneos que los tumores necesitan para crecer.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento de cáncer en el que se utilizan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. La radioterapia se administra de diferentes modos:

  • En la radioterapia externa se utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía radiación hacia el cáncer.
    • En la radioterapia conformal tridimensional se usa una computadora para crear una imagen tridimensional del tumor. Esto permite que los médicos administren la dosis más alta posible de radiación al tumor, previniendo tanto daño al tejido normal como sea posible. Este tipo de radioterapia está en estudio en ensayos clínicos.
    • En la radioterapia corporal estereotáctica se usa un equipo especial para ubicar al paciente y administrarle radiación directamente a los tumores. La dosis total de radiación se divide en dosis más pequeñas que se administran durante varios días. Este tipo de radioterapia está en estudio en ensayos clínicos.
    • La radioterapia con haz de protón es un tipo de radioterapia de alta energía en la que se usan flujos de protones (partículas de materia pequeñas con carga positiva) para destruir las células tumorales. Este tipo de radioterapia está en estudio en ensayos clínicos.

Ensayos clínicos

Para algunos pacientes, la mejor elección de tratamiento puede ser participar en un ensayo clínico. Los ensayos clínicos forman parte del proceso de investigación del cáncer. Los ensayos clínicos se llevan a cabo para determinar si los tratamientos nuevos para el cáncer son seguros y eficaces, o mejores que el tratamiento estándar. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Paul J. Campsen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-2708
University Hospital (801) 585-2708
University Hospital (801) 581-2634

Specialties: Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Kidney Transplant, Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Transplant, Pancreas Transplant, Renal Transplantation, Surgery, General

Thomas Chaly, M.D.

Specialties: Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Kidney Transplant, Liver Biopsies, Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Transplant, Pancreas Transplant, Renal Transplantation, Surgery, General

Robert E. Glasgow, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-6035
University Hospital (801) 585-6035

Specialties: Acute Care Surgery, Barrett's Esophagus, Colorectal Surgery, Endocrine Surgery (Adrenal, Thyroid, Parathyroid), Esophageal Diseases, Esophageal Surgery, GI Motility, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Hernia Surgery (open and laparoscopic), Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Therapeutic Endoscopy, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Ying J. Hitchcock, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Gastrointestinal Cancers, Head and Neck Cancers, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Robin D. Kim, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-6140
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 585-6140
University Hospital (801) 585-6320

Specialties: Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Kidney Transplant, Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Transplant, Pancreas Transplant, Surgery, General, Transplant Surgery

Sean J. Mulvihill, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 581-7167

Specialties: Biliary Cancer, Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Laparoscopy, Liver Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Surgery, General

N. Jewel Samadder, M.Sc., M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 213-9797
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-9797

Specialties: Clinical Genetics, Colon Cancer, Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Pancreatic Cancer

Courtney L. Scaife, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-6911

Specialties: Colorectal Surgery, Esophageal Surgery, Gastric/Esophageal Surgery, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Hepatopancreatobiliary (Liver/Pancreas/Biliary) Surgery, Minimally Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oncology Surgery, Pancreatic Cancer, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Surgery, General, Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Surgery

Dennis C. Shrieve, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Genitourinary Cancers, Lung Cancer, Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Prostate Cancer, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Jonathan D. Tward, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4320

Specialties: Bladder Cancer, Brachytherapy, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Genitourinary Cancers, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Lymphomas, Penile Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Radiation Oncology, Robotic Prostatectomy, Seed Implants, Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), Urologic Oncology

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Tests and Procedures
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

 

Make An Appointment

kevin walker make an appointmentGastrointestinal Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Christy Steele
Phone: 801-587-4422
E-mail: christy.steele@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • In the United States, cancer that has spread to the liver is far more common than cancer that starts in the liver (primary liver cancer).
  • Having hepatitis or cirrhosis can affect a person's risk of developing adult primary liver cancer.

 

clc graphic right column