Melanoma

skin anatomy

Melanoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the skin cells called melanocytes (cells that color the skin). Melanocytes are found throughout the lower part of the epidermis. They make melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural color. When skin is exposed to the sun, melanocytes make more pigment, causing the skin to tan, or darken.

The skin is the body’s largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. The skin has 2 main layers: the epidermis (upper or outer layer) and the dermis (lower or inner layer).

There are 3 types of skin cancer:

  • Melanoma
  • Basal cell skin cancer
  • Squamous cell skin cancer

When melanoma starts in the skin, the disease is called cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma may also occur in mucous membranes (thin, moist layers of tissue that cover surfaces such as the lips). This information is about cutaneous (skin) melanoma and melanoma that affects the mucous membranes. When melanoma occurs in the eye, it is called intraocular melanoma. Melanoma is more aggressive than basal cell skin cancer or squamous cell skin cancer.

Melanoma can occur anywhere on the body. In men, melanoma is often found on the trunk (the area from the shoulders to the hips) or the head and neck. In women, melanoma forms most often on the arms and legs. Melanoma is most common in adults, but it is sometimes found in children and adolescents

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for melanoma include the following:

  • Having a fair complexion, which includes the following:
    • Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not tan, or tans poorly.
    • Blue or green or other light-colored eyes.
    • Red or blond hair.
  • Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) over long periods of time.
  • Being exposed to certain factors in the environment (in the air, your home or workplace, and your food and water). Some of the environmental risk factors for melanoma are radiation, solvents, vinyl chloride, and PCBs.
  • Having a history of many blistering sunburns, especially as a child or teenager.
  • Having several large or many small moles.
  • Having a family history of unusual moles (atypical nevus syndrome).
  • Having a family or personal history of melanoma.
  • Being white.
  • Having a weakened immune system.
  • Having certain changes in the genes that are linked to melanoma.

Being white and having a fair complexion increases the risk of melanoma, but anyone can have melanoma, including people with dark skin.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) recommends regular skin exams to get familiar with individual patterns of moles and freckles, and to look for symptoms of cancerous changes. These and other symptoms may be caused by melanoma. Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • A mole that
    • changes in size, shape, or color.
    • has irregular edges or borders.
    • is more than one color.
    • is asymmetrical (if the mole is divided in half, the 2 halves are different in size or shape).
    • itches.
    • oozes, bleeds, or is ulcerated (a hole forms in the skin when the top layer of cells breaks down and the tissue below shows through).
  • A change in pigmented (colored) skin.
  • Satellite moles (new moles that grow near an existing mole).

Learn about HCI's annual free skin cancer screening by calling the G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center at 1-888-424-2100.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the skin are used to detect (find) and diagnose melanoma. If a mole or pigmented area of the skin changes or looks abnormal, the following tests and procedures can help find and diagnose melanoma:

  • Skin exam: A doctor or nurse checks the skin for moles, birthmarks, or other pigmented areas that look abnormal in color, size, shape, or texture.
  • Biopsy: A procedure to remove the abnormal tissue and a small amount of normal tissue around it. A pathologist looks at the tissue under a microscope to check for cancer cells. It can be hard to tell the difference between a colored mole and an early melanoma lesion. Patients may want to have the sample of tissue checked by a second pathologist. If the abnormal mole or lesion is cancer, the sample of tissue may also be tested for certain gene changes.

A biopsy should be done on any abnormal areas of the skin. These areas should not be shaved off or cauterized (destroyed with a hot instrument, an electric current, or a caustic substance).

Mole mapping involves taking pictures of moles for magnification and for comparison of how they change over time. This is often used when a person has many moles or moles that apprea abnormal. People with a family history of melanoma may need to follow a different screening schedule based on recommendations from a health care provider.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After melanoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the skin or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out whether cancer has spread within the skin or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. Talk with your doctor about what the stage of your cancer is.

The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy: Procedures in which a radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through lymph ducts to the sentinel node or nodes (the first lymph node or nodes where cancer cells are likely to have spread). The surgeon removes only the nodes with the radioactive substance or dye. A pathologist views a sample of tissue under a microscope to check for cancer cells. If no cancer cells are found, it may not be necessary to remove more nodes.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. For melanoma, pictures may be taken of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) with gadolinium: A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, such as the brain. A substance called gadolinium is injected into a vein. The gadolinium collects around the cancer cells so they show up brighter in the picture. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Blood chemistry studies: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. For melanoma, the blood is checked for an enzyme called lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH levels that are higher than normal may be a sign of melanoma.

The results of these tests are viewed together with the results of the tumor biopsy to find out the stage of the melanoma.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if melanoma spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually melanoma cells. The disease is metastatic melanoma, not lung cancer.

The method used to stage melanoma is based mainly on the thickness of the tumor and whether cancer has spread to lymph nodes or other parts of the body.

The staging system is based on the following:

  • The thickness of the tumor. The thickness is described using the Breslow scale.
  • Whether the tumor is ulcerated (has broken the skin).
  • Whether the tumor has spread to the lymph nodes and if the lymph nodes are joined together (matted).
  • Whether the tumor has spread to other parts of the body.

The following stages are used for melanoma:

Stage 0 (Melanoma in Situ)

In stage 0, abnormal melanocytes are found in the epidermis. These abnormal melanocytes may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called melanoma in situ.

Stage I

In stage I, cancer has formed. Stage I is divided into stages IA and IB.

  • Stage IA: In stage IA, the tumor is not more than 1 millimeter thick, with no ulceration.
  • Stage IB: In stage IB, the tumor is either:
    • not more than 1 millimeter thick and it has ulceration; or
    • more than 1 but not more than 2 millimeters thick, with no ulceration.

Stage II

Stage II is divided into stages IIA, IIB, and IIC.

  • Stage IIA: In stage IIA, the tumor is either:
    • more than 1 but not more than 2 millimeters thick, with ulceration; or
    • more than 2 but not more than 4 millimeters thick, with no ulceration.
  • Stage IIB: In stage IIB, the tumor is either:
    • more than 2 but not more than 4 millimeters thick, with ulceration; or
    • more than 4 millimeters thick, with no ulceration.
  • Stage IIC: In stage IIC, the tumor is more than 4 millimeters thick, with ulceration.

Stage III

In stage III, the tumor may be any thickness, with or without ulceration. One or more of the following is true:

  • Cancer has spread to one or more lymph nodes.
  • Lymph nodes may be joined together (matted).
  • Cancer may be in a lymph vessel between the primary tumor and nearby lymph nodes.
  • Very small tumors may be found on or under the skin, not more than 2 centimeters away from where the cancer first started.

Stage IV

In stage IV, the cancer has spread to other places in the body, such as the lung, liver, brain, bone, soft tissue, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Cancer may have spread to places in the skin far away from where it first started.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, melanoma is treated by a team of specialists, including dermatologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the skin), medical oncologists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with melanoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Five types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

The treatments used depend on the stage of the disease and the person's general health and medical history. Learn more in our factsheets by stage of melanoma.

Surgery

Surgery to remove the tumor is the primary treatment of all stages of melanoma. The doctor may remove the tumor using the following operations:

  • Wide local excision: Surgery to remove the melanoma and some of the normal tissue around it. Some of the lymph nodes may also be removed.
  • Lymphadenectomy: A surgical procedure in which the lymph nodes are removed and a sample of tissue is checked under a microscope for signs of cancer.
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy: The removal of the sentinel lymph node (the first lymph node the cancer is likely to spread to from the tumor) during surgery. A radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through the lymph ducts to the lymph nodes. The first lymph node to receive the substance or dye is removed. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells. If cancer cells are not found, it may not be necessary to remove more lymph nodes.

Skin grafting (taking skin from another part of the body to replace the skin that is removed) may be done to cover the wound caused by surgery.

Even if the doctor removes all the melanoma that can be seen at the time of the operation, some patients may be offered chemotherapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Chemotherapy given after surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Chemotherapy

Chemothrapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy).

One type of regional chemotherapy is hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion. With this method, anticancer drugs go directly to the arm or leg the cancer is in. The flow of blood to and from the limb is temporarily stopped with a tourniquet. A warm solution with the anticancer drugs is put directly into the blood of the limb. This gives a high dose of drugs to the area where the cancer is.

The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Biologic therapy

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.

Interferon and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are types of biologic therapy used to treat melanoma. Interferon affects the division of cancer cells and can slow tumor growth. IL-2 boosts the growth and activity of many immune cells, especially lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). Lymphocytes can attack and kill cancer cells.

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a type of biologic therapy used with other treatments for melanoma. TNF is a protein made by white blood cells in response to an antigen or infection. Tumor necrosis factor can be made in the laboratory and used as a treatment to kill cancer cells.

Ipilimumab is a type of biologic therapy used to treat melanoma. It is a monoclonal antibody that increases the immune response against melanoma cells. Other monoclonal antibodies are being studied in the treatment of melanoma.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. The following types of targeted therapy are being used in the treatment of melanoma:

  • Signal transduction inhibitor therapy: A type of targeted therapy. Signal transduction inhibitors block signals that are passed from one molecule to another inside a cell. Blocking these signals may kill cancer cells. Vemurafenib is a signal transduction inhibitor used to treat some patients with advanced melanoma or tumors that cannot be removed by surgery.
  • Oncolytic virus therapy: A type of targeted therapy that is being studied in the treatment of melanoma. Oncolytic virus therapy uses a virus that infects and breaks down cancer cells but not normal cells. Radiation therapy or chemotherapy may be given after oncolytic virus therapy to kill more cancer cells.
  • Angiogenesis inhibitors: A type of targeted therapy that is being studied in the treatment of melanoma. Angiogenesis inhibitors block the growth of new blood vessels. In cancer treatment, they may be given to prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow.

Clinical trials

These studies discover and evaluate new and improved cancer treatments. Patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors about participating in a clinical trial or any questions regarding research studies. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to HCI patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El melanoma es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en las células de la piel llamadas melanocitos (células que dan color a la piel).

Los melanocitos se encuentran en la parte inferior de la epidermis. Elaboran melanina, el pigmento que confiere a la piel su color natural. Cuando la piel se expone al sol, los melanocitos elaboran más pigmento, con lo cual la piel se broncea u oscurece.

La piel es el órgano más grande del cuerpo. Protege el cuerpo de la temperatura, la luz solar, las heridas y las infecciones. La piel tiene dos capas principales: la epidermis (capa superior o externa) y la dermis (capa inferior o interna).

Hay tres tipos de cáncer de piel:

  • Melanoma.
  • Cáncer de piel de células basales.
  • Cáncer de piel de células escamosas.

Cuando el melanoma comienza en la piel, la enfermedad se llama melanoma cutáneo. El melanoma también se puede presentar en las membranas mucosas (capas finas de tejido húmedo que recubre superficies como la de los labios). El presente sumario trata sobre el melanoma cutáneo (piel) y el melanoma que afecta las membranas mucosas. Cuando el melanoma se presenta en el ojo se llama melanoma ocular.

El melanoma es de más activo que el cáncer de piel de células basales o el cáncer de piel de células escamosas.

El melanoma se puede presentar en cualquier lugar del cuerpo. En los hombres, generalmente se encuentra en el tronco (el área del cuerpo entre los hombros y las caderas) o en la cabeza y el cuello. En las mujeres, el melanoma se forma con mayor frecuencia en los brazos y las piernas. El melanoma es más común en adultos pero, en algunos casos, se encuentra en niños y adolescentes.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta el riesgo de padecer de una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a padecer de cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se va a padecer de cáncer. Consulte con su médico si piensa que está en riesgo. Los factores de riesgo para el melanoma incluyen los siguientes aspectos:

  • Tener la piel de la cara con las siguientes características:
    • Piel de la cara clara que se pone pecosa y se quema fácilmente, no se broncea o se broncea mal.
    • Color de ojos azul, verde o de otro color claro.
    • Cabello pelirrojo o rubio.
  • Estar expuesto a luz solar natural o a la luz solar artificial (como la de las cámaras de bronceado) durante períodos largos de tiempo.
  • Estar expuesto a ciertos factores en el ambiente (en el aire, el hogar o el sitio de trabajo, y la comida o el agua). Algunos factores de riesgo ambiental de melanoma son la radiación, los solventes, el cloruro vinílico y los BPC.
  • Tener antecedentes de quemaduras de sol con ampollas especialmente en la niñez o la adolescencia.
  • Tener varios lunares grandes o muchos pequeños.
  • Tener antecedentes familiares de lunares anormales (síndrome de la mola atípica).
  • Tener antecedentes familiares o antecedentes personales de melanoma.
  • Ser de raza blanca.
  • Tener un sistema inmunitario debilitado.
  • Tener ciertos cambios en los genes que se relacionan con el melanoma.

Tener la piel blanca o ser de color claro aumenta el riesgo de melanoma, pero cualquier persona puede presentar melanoma, incluso las personas de piel oscura.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Los signos de melanoma son un cambio en el aspecto de un lunar o área pigmentada. El melanoma u otras afecciones pueden producir estos y otros signos y síntomas. Consulte con su médico si tiene algo de lo siguiente:

  • Un lunar que:
    • Cambia de tamaño, forma o color.
    • Tiene contornos o bordes irregulares.
    • Tiene más de un color.
    • Es asimétrico (si se divide el lunar por la mitad, las dos mitades son diferentes en tamaño o forma).
    • Produce picazón.
    • Supura, sangra o está ulcerado (se forma un hueco en la piel cuando la capa superior de las células se rompe y se puede ver el tejido debajo de la piel).
  • Un cambio en la piel pigmentada (de color).
  • Lunares satelitales (lunares nuevos que crecen cerca de un lunar existente).

Para obtener imágenes y descripciones de lunares comunes y melanomas, consultar la hoja informativa Lunares comunes, nevos displásicos y el riesgo de melanoma.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el melanoma, se usan pruebas que examinan la piel. Si un lunar o un área pigmentada de la piel cambian o tienen apariencia anormal, las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos pueden ayudar a encontrar y diagnosticar el melanoma:

  • Examen de la piel: un médico o enfermero revisa la piel en busca de lunares, manchas de nacimiento u otras áreas pigmentadas que tienen aspecto anormal en cuanto a color, tamaño, forma o textura.
  • Biopsia: procedimiento para extraer el tejido anormal y una pequeña cantidad de tejido normal circundante. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Puede ser difícil diferenciar entre un lunar con color y una lesión de melanoma temprana. Los pacientes deben considerar que un segundo patólogo examine la muestra de tejido. Si el lunar o lesión anormal es cáncer, la muestra de tejido también se puede examinar para determinar ciertos cambios genéticos.

Se debe realizar una biopsia de cualquier área anormal de la piel. Estas no se deben afeitar o cauterizar (destruirse con un instrumento caliente, una corriente eléctrica o una sustancia cáustica).

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticarse el melanoma, se llevan a cabo pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se han diseminado dentro de la piel o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso usado para determinar si el cáncer se ha diseminado dentro de la piel o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida durante el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio de la enfermedad para planificar el tratamiento. Se debe hablar con el médico acerca del estadio en el que está el cáncer.

Se pueden usar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos en el proceso de estadificación:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para revisar el estado general de salud, e identificar cualquier signo de enfermedad, como nódulos o cualquier otra cosa que parezca inusual. También se toman datos sobre los hábitos de salud del paciente, así como los antecedentes de enfermedades y los tratamientos aplicados en cada caso.
  • Mapeo de ganglios linfáticos y biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela: procedimiento mediante el cual se inyecta una sustancia radiactiva o un tinte azul cerca del tumor. La sustancia o tinte viaja a través de los conductos linfáticos hasta el ganglio o los ganglios linfáticos centinelas (el primer ganglio o ganglios linfáticos hasta donde es probable que el cáncer se haya diseminado). El cirujano extrae solo aquellos ganglios marcados con la sustancia radiactiva o tinte. Un patólogo observa una muestra de tejido al microscopio para ver si hay células cancerosas. Si no hay células cancerosas, posiblemente no es necesario extirpar más nódulos.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, como el cuello, el pecho y el abdomen, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada. En el caso del melanoma, las imágenes se pueden tomar del tórax, el abdomen y la pelvis.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para detectar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El escáner de TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que utilizan la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • Imágenes por resonancia magnética (IRM) con gadolinio: procedimiento en el que se utiliza un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo, como el cerebro. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia que se llama gadolinio. El gadolinio se acumula alrededor de las células cancerosas y las hace aparecer más brillantes en la imagen. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Estudios químicos de la sangre: procedimientos por los cuales se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias que los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo liberan en la sangre. Para el melanoma, se analiza la sangre para determinar si contiene una enzima que se llama lactato-deshidrogenasa (LDH). Cuando las concentraciones de LDH son más altas que lo normal, esto puede ser un signo de melanoma.

Los resultados de estas pruebas se consideran junto con los resultados de la biopsia del tumor para ver en que estadio se encuentra el melanoma.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el melanoma se disemina a los pulmones, las células cancerosas en los pulmones son, en realidad, células de melanoma. La enfermedad es melanoma metastásico, no cáncer de pulmón.

El método que se usa para estadificar el melanoma se basa principalmente en el grosor del tumor y en el hecho de que el cáncer se haya diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El sistema de estadificación se basa en los siguientes aspectos:

  • El grosor del tumor. El grosor se describe mediante el grosor de Breslow.
  • Si el tumor se ulceró (se rompió la piel).
  • Si el tumor se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos y si los ganglios linfáticos están unidos entre sí (enredados).
  • Si el tumor se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el melanoma:

Estadio 0 (melanoma in situ)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran melanocitos anormales en la epidermis. Estos melanocitos anormales se pueden volver cancerosos y diseminarse hacia el tejido cercano normal. El estadio 0 también se llama melanoma in situ.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se formó. El estadio I se divide en los estadios IA y IB.

  • Estadio IA: en el estadio IA, el tumor no mide más de un milímetro de grosor, sin ulceración.
  • Estadio IB: en el estadio IB, el tumor:
    • No mide más de un milímetro de grosor, y tiene ulceración; o
    • Mide más de uno pero no más de dos milímetros de grosor, sin ulceración.

Estadio II

El estadio II se divide en los estadios IIA, IIB y IIC.

  • Estadio IIA: en el estadio IIA, el tumor:
    • Mide más de uno pero no más de dos milímetros de grosor, con ulceración; o
    • Mide más de dos pero no más de cuatro milímetros de grosor, sin ulceración.
  • Estadio IIB: en el estadio IIB, el tumor:
    • Mide más de dos pero no más de cuatro milímetros de grosor, con ulceración; o
    • Mide más de cuatro milímetros de grosor, sin ulceración.
  • Estadio IIC: en el estadio IIC, el tumor tiene más de cuatro milímetros de grosor, con ulceración.

Estadio III

En el estadio III, el tumor puede tener cualquier grosor, con ulceración o sin esta. Se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones:

  • El cáncer se diseminó hasta uno o más ganglios linfáticos.
  • Los ganglios linfáticos pueden estar unidos (apelotonados).
  • El cáncer puede estar en un vaso linfático entre el tumor primario y los ganglios linfáticos cercanos.
  • Se pueden encontrar tumores muy pequeños sobre la piel o debajo de esta a no más de dos centímetros del lugar donde empezó el cáncer.

Estadio IV

En el estadio IV, el cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo, como el pulmón, el hígado, el cerebro, el hueso, el tejido blando o el tubo gastrointestinal (GI). El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta sitios de la piel muy alejados del lugar donde empezó.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de melanoma. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un nuevo tratamiento es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan cinco tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Quimioterapia
  • Radioterapia
  • Terapia biológica
  • Terapia dirigida

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La cirugía para extirpar el tumor es el tratamiento primario para todos los estadios del melanoma. El médico puede extraer el tumor mediante las siguientes operaciones:

  • Escisión local amplia: cirugía para extirpar el melanoma y parte del tejido normal que le rodea. También se pueden extirpar algunos ganglios linfáticos.
  • Linfadenectomía: procedimiento quirúrgico en el cual se extirpan los ganglios linfáticos y se examina una muestra de tejido al microscopio para ver si hay signos de cáncer.
  • Biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela: extracción de un ganglio linfático centinela (el primer ganglio linfático al cual el cáncer tiene más probabilidades de diseminarse a partir del tumor). Se inyecta una sustancia radiactiva o un tinte azul cerca del tumor. La sustancia o el tinte fluyen a través de los conductos linfáticos hacia los ganglios linfáticos. Se extirpa el primer ganglio linfático que recibe la sustancia o tinte. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio en busca de células cancerosas. Si no se encuentran células cancerosas, puede no ser necesario extraer más ganglios linfáticos.

Injerto de piel (se toma piel de otra parte del cuerpo para reemplazar la piel que se extrae). Este procedimiento se puede realizar para cubrir la herida causada por la cirugía.

Incluso si el médico extrae todo el melanoma visible durante la operación, es posible que se administre quimioterapia a algunos pacientes después de la cirugía para eliminar toda célula cancerosa que pueda haber quedado. La quimioterapia administrada después de la cirugía, para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva, se llama terapia adyuvante.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento del cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para interrumpir la proliferación de células cancerosas, mediante la eliminación de las células o deteniendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra oralmente o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y afectan las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas en esas áreas (quimioterapia regional).

Un tipo de quimioterapia regional es la perfusión de un miembro aislado hipertérmica en los miembros. Mediante este método los medicamentos contra el cáncer van directamente al brazo o la pierna donde se encuentra el cáncer. Se detiene o se interrumpe temporalmente el flujo de sangre hacia y desde el miembro con un torniquete, y se coloca una solución tibia que contiene medicamentos contra el cáncer directamente en la sangre del miembro. Esto permite al paciente recibir una dosis alta de medicamentos en el área donde se presentó el cáncer.

La forma en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que usa rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para eliminar las células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo la cual envía radiación al área donde se encuentra el cáncer. La radioterapia interna utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente dentro del cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Terapia biológica

La terapia biológica es el tratamiento para estimular la capacidad del sistema inmunitario para combatir el cáncer. Se usan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o en el laboratorio para reforzar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra la enfermedad. Este tipo de tratamiento para el cáncer también se llama bioterapia o inmunoterapia.

El interferón y la interleucina-2 (IL-2) son tipos de terapia biológica que se usan para el tratamiento del melanoma. El interferón afecta la multiplicación celular y puede disminuir el crecimiento del tumor. IL-2 impulsa el crecimiento y actividad de muchas células inmunitarias, sobre todo los linfocitos (un tipo de glóbulo blanco). Los linfocitos pueden atacar y destruir las células cancerosas.

El tratamiento con un factor de necrosis tumoral (FNT) es un tipo de terapia bilógica que se usa junto con otros tratamientos para el melanoma. El FNT es una proteína elaborada por los glóbulos blancos en respuesta a un antígeno o una infección. El factor de necrosis tumoral se puede producir en el laboratorio y usar como tratamiento para eliminar las células cancerosas.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento para el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales. Para el tratamiento del melanoma, se usan los siguientes tipos de terapia dirigida:

  • Terapia con anticuerpos monoclonales: tratamiento contra el cáncer para el que se usan anticuerpos producidos en el laboratorio a partir de un tipo único de célula del sistema inmunitario. Estos anticuerpos pueden identificar sustancias en las células cancerosas o sustancias normales que pueden ayudar a que las células cancerosas crezcan. Los anticuerpos se unen a las sustancias y destruyen las células cancerosas, impiden su crecimiento o impiden que se diseminen. Los anticuerpos monoclonales se administran por infusión. Se pueden administrar solos o para enviar medicamentos, toxinas, o material radiactivo directamente hasta las células cancerosas. Los anticuerpos monoclonales se pueden usar en combinación con quimioterapia como terapia adyuvante. El ipilimumab es un anticuerpo monoclonal que se usa para tratar el melanoma. Hay otros anticuerpos monoclonales que se encuentran en estudio para el tratamiento del melanoma.
  • Terapia con inhibidor de la transducción de señales: tipo de terapia dirigida. Los inhibidores de la transducción de señales bloquean las señales que pasan de una molécula a otra en el interior de una célula. El bloqueo de estas señales puede destruir células cancerosas. El vemurafenib es un inhibidor de la transducción de señales que se usa para tratar a algunos pacientes con melanoma avanzado o tumores que no se pueden extirpar mediante cirugía.
  • Terapia vírica oncolítica: tipo de terapia dirigida en estudio para tratar el melanoma. La terapia vírica oncolítica usa un virus que infecta y descompone las células cancerosas pero no las células normales. Es posible administrar radioterapia o quimioterapia luego de la administración de terapia vírica oncolítica para eliminar más células cancerosas.
  • Inhibidores de la angiogénesis: tipo de terapia dirigida en estudio para tratar el melanoma. Los inhibidores de la angiogénesis impiden la formación de nuevos vasos sanguíneos. En el tratamiento del cáncer, se pueden administrar a fin de prevenir la formación de vasos sanguíneos nuevos que los tumores necesitan para crecer.

Ensayos clínicos

Para algunos pacientes, la mejor elección de tratamiento puede ser participar en un ensayo clínico. Los ensayos clínicos forman parte del proceso de investigación del cáncer. Los ensayos clínicos se llevan a cabo para determinar si los tratamientos nuevos para el cáncer son seguros y eficaces, o mejores que el tratamiento estándar. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Robert Hans Ingemar Andtbacka, M.D., C.M.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 587-8808

Specialties: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Oncology, Oncology Surgery, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Soft Tissue Sarcomas, Surgery, General

Glen M. Bowen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery

Keith Duffy, M.D.

Locations
Dermatology & Laser Center (801) 581-2955
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 581-2955
Redstone Health Center (435) 658-9262
South Jordan Health Center (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Dermatopathology, General Dermatology, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery

Mark J. Eliason, M.D.

Locations
Dermatology Murray Clinic (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Allergic Skin Diseases, Dermatology, General Dermatology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology

Douglas Grossman, Ph.D., M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Dermatology, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology

Mark A. Hyde, M.M.Sc., P.A.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0206

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery, Physician Assistant

Payam Tristani-Firouzi, M.D.

Locations
Dermatology & Laser Center (801) 581-2955
Dermatology Murray Clinic (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Dermatology, Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery

David A. Wada, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Dermatopathology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Interactive Tools
Videos
Articles
News
Drug Reference
Health Tips

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

travis hakala skin cancer Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program
Care coordinator: Travis Hakala
Phone: 801-585-0209
E-mail:travis.hakala@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • A person will sunburn 30% faster in Salt Lake City than in Los Angeles. This is because the UV intensity is much greater at Salt Lake City's high altitude.
  • For best skin protection, look for a broad-spectrum sunblock that contains zinc oxide or titanium dioxide with an SPF 30 or higher.
  • Huntsman Cancer Institute offers an annual free skin cancer screening. Call the Cancer Learning Center at 1-888-424-2100 for more information.
clc graphic right column