Mesothelioma

lungsMalignant mesothelioma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells are found in the pleura (the thin layer of tissue that lines the chest cavity and covers the lungs) or the peritoneum (the thin layer of tissue that lines the abdomen and covers most of the organs in the abdomen). Malignant mesothelioma may also form in the heart or testicles, but this is rare.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk to your doctor if you think you may be at risk.

Most people with malignant mesothelioma have worked or lived in places where they inhaled or swallowed asbestos. After being exposed to asbestos, it usually takes a long time for malignant mesothelioma to form. Living with a person who works near asbestos is also a risk factor for malignant mesothelioma.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Sometimes the cancer causes fluid to collect in the chest or in the abdomen. Signs and symptoms may be caused by the fluid, malignant mesothelioma, or other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Trouble breathing.
  • Cough.
  • Pain under the rib cage.
  • Pain or swelling in the abdomen.
  • Lumps in the abdomen.
  • Constipation.
  • Problems with blood clots (clots form when they shouldn’t).
  • Weight loss for no known reason.
  • Feeling very tired.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis 

Sometimes it is hard to tell the difference between malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used to diagnose malignant mesothelioma in the chest or peritoneum:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits, exposure to asbestos, past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Chest x-ray: This is an x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of the chest and abdomen, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues from the pleura or peritoneum so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. Procedures used to collect the cells or tissues include the following:
    • Fine-needle (FNA) aspiration biopsy of the lung: The removal of tissue or fluid using a thin needle. An imaging procedure is used to locate the abnormal tissue or fluid in the lung. A small incision may be made in the skin where the biopsy needle is inserted into the abnormal tissue or fluid, and a sample is removed.
    • Thoracoscopy: The surgeon makes several small incisions in your chest and back. The surgeon looks at the lungs and nearby tissues with a thin, lighted tube. If an abnormal area is seen, a biopsy to check for cancer cells may be needed.
    • Peritoneoscopy: An incision (cut) is made in the abdominal wall and a peritoneoscope (a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing) is inserted into the abdomen.
    • Laparotomy: An incision (cut) is made in the wall of the abdomen to check the inside of the abdomen for signs of disease.
    • Open biopsy: A procedure in which an incision (cut) is made through the skin to expose and remove tissues to check for signs of disease.

      The following tests may be done on the cells and tissue samples that are taken:
    • Cytologic exam: An exam of cells under a microscope to check for anything abnormal. For mesothelioma, fluid is taken from the chest or from the abdomen. A pathologist checks the fluid for signs of cancer.
    • Immunohistochemistry: A test that uses antibodies to check for certain antigens in a sample of tissue. The antibody is usually linked to a radioactive substance or a dye that causes the tissue to light up under a microscope. This type of test may be used to tell the difference between different types of cancer.
    • Electron microscopy: A laboratory test in which cells in a sample of tissue are viewed under a high-powered microscope to look for certain changes in the cells. An electron microscope shows tiny details better than other types of microscopes.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

The process used to find out if cancer has spread outside the pleura or peritoneum is called staging. The information gathered from this process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the spread of the cancer in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of the chest and abdomen, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS): A procedure in which an endoscope is inserted into the body. An endoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. A probe at the end of the endoscope is used to bounce high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. This procedure is also called endosonography. EUS may be used to guide fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the lung, lymph nodes, or other areas.
  • Pulmonary function test (PFT): A test to see how well the lungs are working. It measures how much air the lungs can hold and how quickly air moves into and out of the lungs. It also measures how much oxygen is used and how much carbon dioxide is given off during breathing. This is also called lung function test.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body. When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if malignant mesothelioma spreads to the brain, the cancer cells in the brain are actually malignant mesothelioma cells. The disease is metastatic malignant mesothelioma, not brain cancer.

Stages of Malignant Mesothelioma

Stage I (Localized)

Stage I is divided into stages IA and IB:

  • In stage IA, cancer is found in one side of the chest in the lining of the chest wall and may also be found in the lining of the chest cavity between the lungs and/or the lining that covers the diaphragm. Cancer has not spread to the lining that covers the lung.
  • In stage IB, cancer is found in one side of the chest in the lining of the chest wall and the lining that covers the lung. Cancer may also be found in the lining of the chest cavity between the lungs and/or the lining that covers the diaphragm.

Stage II (Advanced)

In stage II, cancer is found in one side of the chest in the lining of the chest wall, the lining of the chest cavity between the lungs, the lining that covers the diaphragm, and the lining that covers the lung. Also, cancer has spread into one or both of the following:

  • Lung tissue
  • Diaphragm

Stage III (Advanced)

In stage III, cancer is found in one side of the chest in the lining of the chest wall. Cancer may have spread to

  • the lining of the chest cavity between the lungs.
  • the lining that covers the diaphragm.
  • the lining that covers the lung.
  • the lung tissue.
  • the diaphragm.

Cancer has spread to lymph nodes where the lung joins the bronchus, along the trachea and esophagus, between the lung and diaphragm, or below the trachea.

or

Cancer is found in one side of the chest in the lining of the chest wall, the lining of the chest cavity between the lungs, the lining that covers the diaphragm, and the lining that covers the lung. Cancer has spread into one or more of the following:

  • Tissue between the ribs and the lining of the chest wall
  • Fat in the cavity between the lungs
  • Soft tissues of the chest wall
  • Sac that covers the heart

Cancer may have spread to lymph nodes where the lung joins the bronchus, along the trachea and esophagus, between the lung and diaphragm, or below the trachea.

Stage IV (Advanced)

In stage IV, cancer cannot be removed by surgery and is found in one or both sides of the body. Cancer may have spread to lymph nodes anywhere in the chest or above the collarbone. Cancer has spread in one or more of the following ways:

  • Through the diaphragm into the peritoneum (the thin layer of tissue that lines the abdomen and covers most of the organs in the abdomen)
  • To the tissue lining the chest on the opposite side of the body as the tumor
  • To the chest wall and may be found in the rib
  • Into the organs in the center of the chest cavity
  • Into the spine
  • Into the sac around the heart or into the heart muscle
  • To distant parts of the body such as the brain, spine, thyroid, or prostate

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, mesothelioma is treated by a team of specialists, including surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Mesothelioma treatment options include the following:

A patient may receive more than one type of treatment. The treatment that's right for each patient depends on the type and stage of the cancer.

Surgery

The following types of surgery may be used for mesothelioma:

  • Wide local excision: Surgery to remove the cancer and some of the healthy tissue around it.
  • Pleurectomy and decortication: Surgery to remove part of the covering of the lungs and lining of the chest and part of the outside surface of the lungs.
  • Extrapleural pneumonectomy: Surgery to remove one whole lung and part of the lining of the chest, the diaphragm, and the lining of the sac around the heart.
  • Pleurodesis: A surgical procedure that uses chemicals or drugs to make a scar in the space between the layers of the pleura. Fluid is first drained from the space using a catheter or chest tube and the chemical or drug is put into the space. The scarring stops the build-up of fluid in the pleural cavity.

Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the chest or peritoneum, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). Combination chemotherapy is the use of more than one anticancer drug.

Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy is used in the treatment of mesothelioma that has spread to the peritoneum (tissue that lines the abdomen and covers most of the organs in the abdomen). After the surgeon removes all the cancer that can be seen, a solution containing anticancer drugs is heated and pumped into and out of the abdomen to kill cancer cells that remain. Heating the anticancer drugs may kill more cancer cells.

The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our introduction to chemotherapy video.

 

Clinical trials

These studies discover and evaluate new and improved cancer treatments. Patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors about participating in a clinical trial or any questions regarding research studies. For more information, also visit HCI's clinical trials website.

  • Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to HCI patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness and Integrative Health Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This page last updated May 2015

 

El mesotelioma maligno es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en el revestimiento del tórax o el abdomen.

El mesotelioma maligno es una enfermedad en la cual se encuentran células malignas (cancerosas) en la pleura (la capa delgada de tejido que reviste la cavidad torácica y cubre los pulmones) o el peritoneo (la capa delgada de tejido que reviste el abdomen y cubre la mayoría de los órganos del abdomen). Este sumario se refiere al mesotelioma maligno de la pleura.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta el riesgo de contraer una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que usted va a tener cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que usted no va a tener cáncer. Hable con su médico si piensa que puede estar en riesgo.

La mayoría de las personas con mesotelioma maligno han trabajado o vivido en lugares en los que inhalaron o tragaron amianto. Después de la exposición al amianto, habitualmente pasa mucho tiempo hasta que se forma un mesotelioma maligno. Vivir junto a una persona que trabaja cerca del amianto también es un factor de riesgo para el mesotelioma maligno.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Algunas veces el cáncer hace que se acumule líquido en el pecho o en el abdomen. Los signos y síntomas pueden ser producidos por líquido, un mesotelioma maligno u otras afecciones. Consulte con su médico si presenta cualquiera de los siguientes síntomas:

  • Dificultad para respirar.
  • Tos.
  • Dolor debajo de la caja torácica.
  • Dolor de abdomen o inflamación del mismo.
  • Nódulos en el abdomen.
  • Estreñimiento.
  • Problemas con coágulos de sangre (coágulos que se forman cuando no deben hacerlo).
  • Pérdida de peso sin razón conocida.
  • Sensación de mucho cansancio.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el mesotelioma maligno, se usan pruebas que examinan el interior del tórax y del abdomen.

En algunos casos es difícil diferenciar un mesotelioma maligno en el pecho y un cáncer de pulmón. Para diagnosticar un mesotelioma maligno en el pecho o el peritoneo se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para comprobar los signos generales de salud, inclusive el control de signos de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca anormal. Se toma también los antecedentes de los hábitos de salud, la exposición a amiantos, las enfermedades y los tratamientos anteriores del paciente.
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y huesos del interior del tórax. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen del interior del cuerpo.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del tórax y el abdomen desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen de forma más clara. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos de la pleura o el peritoneo realizada por un patólogo para observarlos al microscopio y determinar si hay signos de cáncer.
    • Los procedimientos utilizados para recolectar células o tejidos son los siguientes:

      • Biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina (AAF) del pulmón: extracción de tejido o líquido mediante una aguja fina. Se usa un procedimiento de imaginología para localizar el tejido o líquido anormales en el pulmón. Se puede realizar una pequeña incisión en la piel donde se introduce la aguja de biopsia hacia el tejido o líquido anormales y se extrae una muestra.
      • Toracoscopia: procedimiento para el que se hace una incisión (corte) entre dos costillas y se introduce un toracoscopio (un instrumento delgado con forma de tubo con una luz y una lente para observar) en el pecho.
      • Toracotomía: incisión (corte) que se hace entre dos costillas para examinar el interior del tórax y determinar si hay signos de enfermedad.
      • Peritoneoscopia: procedimiento por el que se hace una incisión (corte) en la pared abdominal y se introduce un peritoneoscopio (un instrumento delgado con forma de tubo con una luz y una lente para observar) en el abdomen.
      • Laparotomía: procedimiento para el que se hace una incisión (corte) en la pared del abdomen para verificar la presencia de signos de enfermedad en el interior del abdomen.
      • Biopsia abierta: procedimiento en el que se hace una incisión (corte) en la piel para exponer y extraer tejidos a fin de examinarlos y determinar si hay signos de enfermedad.
  • Se pueden realizar las siguientes pruebas en las muestras de células y tejidos que se tomen:

    • Examen citológico: examen de células bajo el microscopio para determinar si hay algo anormal. En el caso de mesotelioma, se extrae líquido del pecho o el abdomen. Un patólogo revisa estos líquidos en busca de signos de cáncer.
    • Inmunohistoquímica: prueba para la que se usan anticuerpos en busca de ciertos antígenos en una muestra de tejido. El anticuerpo por lo general se enlaza con una sustancia radiactiva o un tinte que hace que el tejido se ilumine bajo el microscopio. Este tipo de prueba se puede usar para establecer la diferencia entre tipos diferentes de cáncer.
    • Microscopía electrónica: prueba de laboratorio en la que se observan células de una muestra de tejido al microscopio de alta potencia con el fin de ver cambios en las células. Un microscopio electrónico muestra mejor los detalles minúsculos que otros tipos de microscopios.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticar el mesotelioma maligno, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron a otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el cáncer se ha diseminado fuera de la pleura o el peritoneo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer hasta dónde se diseminó el cáncer para planificar el tratamiento.

En el proceso de estadificación, se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de fotografías detalladas del interior del tórax y del abdomen desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta una tinción en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El explorador TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales
  • Ecografía endoscópica (EE): procedimiento en el cual se introduce un endoscopio en el cuerpo. Un endoscopio es un instrumento delgado en forma de tubo con una luz y una lente para observar. Se usa una sonda ubicada en el extremo del endoscopio para hacer rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasónicas) en los tejidos o los órganos internos y crear ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos del cuerpo llamada ecograma. Este procedimiento también se llama endoecografía. La EE se puede usar para guiar la biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina (AAF) del pulmón, los ganglios linfáticos u otras áreas.
  • Prueba de función pulmonar (PFP): prueba que se usa para medir el funcionamiento de los pulmones. Permite medir la cantidad de aire que los pulmones pueden contener y la rapidez con la que el aire se mueve hacia adentro y fuera de los pulmones. También mide la cantidad de oxígeno que se usa y la cantidad de dióxido de carbono que se despide durante la respiración. También se llama prueba funcional pulmonar.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el mesotelioma maligno se disemina al cerebro, las células cancerosas en el cerebro son, en realidad, células de mesotelioma maligno. La enfermedad es mesotelioma maligno metastásico, no cáncer de cerebro. 

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el mesotelioma maligno:

Estadio I (localizado)

El estadio I se divide en los estadios IA y IB:

  • En el estadio IA, el cáncer se encuentra en un costado del pecho, en el revestimiento de la pared torácica y también se puede encontrar en el revestimiento de la cavidad torácica, entre los pulmones o en el revestimiento del diafragma. El cáncer no se diseminó hasta el revestimiento del pulmón.
  • En el estadio IB, el cáncer se encuentra en un lado del pecho, en el revestimiento de la pared torácica y el revestimiento del pulmón. El cáncer también se puede encontrar en el revestimiento de la cavidad torácica entre los pulmones o en el revestimiento del diafragma.

Estadio II (avanzado)

En el estadio II, el cáncer se encuentra en un lado del pecho, en el revestimiento de la pared torácica, el revestimiento de la cavidad torácica entre los pulmones, el revestimiento del diafragma y en el revestimiento del pulmón. Además, el cáncer se diseminó hasta uno o ambos de los siguientes sitios:

  • Diafragma.
  • Pulmón.

Estadio III (avanzado)

En el estadio III, se presenta cualquiera de las siguientes situaciones:

El cáncer se encuentra en un lado del pecho, en el revestimiento de la pared torácica. El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta los siguientes sitios:

  • El revestimiento de la cavidad torácica entre los pulmones;
  • El revestimiento del diafragma;
  • El revestimiento del pulmón;
  • El diafragma;
  • El pulmón.

El cáncer se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos donde el pulmón se une con el bronquio, a lo largo de la tráquea y el esófago, entre el pulmón y el diafragma o debajo de la tráquea.

o

El cáncer se encuentra en un costado del pecho, en el revestimiento de la pared torácica, el revestimiento de la pared torácica entre los pulmones, el revestimiento del diafragma y el revestimiento del pulmón. El cáncer se diseminó hasta uno o más de los siguientes sitios:

  • El tejido entre las costillas y el revestimiento de la pared torácica.
  • La grasa de la cavidad entre los pulmones.
  • Los tejidos blandos de la pared torácica.
  • La bolsa que cubre el corazón.

El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos donde el pulmón se une con el bronquio, a lo largo de la tráquea y el esófago, entre el pulmón y el diafragma o debajo de la tráquea.

Estadio IV (avanzado)

En el estadio IV, el cáncer no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía y se encuentra en uno o ambos lados del cuerpo. El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos de cualquier lugar del pecho o encima de la clavícula. El cáncer se diseminó en una o más de las maneras siguientes:

  • A través del diafragma hacia el peritoneo (la capa delgada de tejido que reviste el abdomen y cubre la mayoría de los órganos del abdomen).
  • Hasta el tejido que reviste el pecho del lado opuesto del cuerpo en que está el tumor.
  • Hasta la pared torácica y se puede encontrar en la costilla.
  • Hacia los órganos del centro de la cavidad torácica.
  • Hacia la espina vertebral.
  • Hacia el saco que rodea el corazón o hacia el corazón.
  • Hasta partes distantes del cuerpo como el cerebro, la espina vertebral, la tiroides o la próstata.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes con mesotelioma maligno. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento consiste en un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un nuevo tratamiento es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan tres tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

Se pueden utilizar los siguientes tratamientos quirúrgicos para el mesotelioma maligno:

  • Escisión local amplia: cirugía para extraer el cáncer y parte del tejido sano que lo rodea.
  • Pleurectomía y decorticación: cirugía para extraer parte de la cubierta de los pulmones y el revestimiento del tórax, y parte de la superficie externa de los pulmones.
  • Neumonectomía extrapleural: cirugía para extraer un pulmón completo y parte del revestimiento del tórax, el diafragma y el revestimiento del saco que envuelve el corazón.
  • Pleurodesis: procedimiento quirúrgico que utiliza sustancias químicas o medicamentos para crear una cicatriz en el espacio entre las capas de la pleura. Primero, se drena el líquido del espacio con un catéter o sonda torácica y se coloca la sustancia química o el medicamento en el espacio. La cicatrización interrumpe la acumulación de líquido en la cavidad pleural.

Aunque el médico extirpe todo el cáncer visible en el momento de la cirugía, algunos pacientes reciben quimioterapia o radioterapia después de la cirugía para destruir cualquier célula cancerosa que haya quedado. El tratamiento administrado después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que utiliza rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía la radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres, que se coloca directamente en el cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y del estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer para el que se utilizan medicamentos para detener el crecimiento de las células cancerosas, ya sea destruyéndolas o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por vía oral o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos entran en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el pecho y el peritoneo, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas en esas zonas (quimioterapia regional). La quimioterapia combinada es el uso de más de un medicamento contra el cáncer.

La quimioterapia intraperitoneal hipertérmica se usa para tratar el mesotelioma que se diseminó al peritoneo (tejido que reviste el abdomen y cubre la mayoría de los órganos del abdomen.) Luego de que el cirujano extrae todo el cáncer visible, se usa una solución que contiene medicamentos contra el cáncer que se calienta y se bombea dentro y fuera del estómago para eliminar las células cancerosas restantes. Al calentar los medicamentos contra el cáncer se pueden destruir más células cancerosas.

La manera en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo de cáncer que se esté tratando y el estadio en que se encuentre.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

  • Terapia biológica es un tratamiento que utiliza el sistema inmunitario del paciente para combatir el cáncer. Se utilizan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o fabricadas en el laboratorio para reforzar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra el cáncer. Este tipo de tratamiento del cáncer se conoce también como bioterapia o inmunoterapia. 

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Wallace L. Akerley, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4266

Specialties: Lung Cancer, Medical Oncology, Metastatic Disease, Oncology

Courtney E. Bartlett, APRN

Locations
Eccles Primary Children’s Outpatient Services Building (801) 662-1000
University Hospital (801) 581-0434

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Nurse Practitioner

David Brock, PA-C

Locations
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5582

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

David A. Bull, M.D.

Locations
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500
University Hospital (801) 581-5311

Specialties: Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Revascularization, Esophageal Surgery, Heart Transplant, Lung Cancer, Lung Transplant, Valvular Heart Disease

Phillip T. Burch, M.D.

Locations
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5577

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery

Barbara C. Cahill, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 585-3697
University Hospital (801) 581-7806

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, Critical Care, Lung Transplant, Pulmonary, Tuberculosis

Megan W. Calamel, PA-C

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-5311

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Daniel Christopherson, P.A.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-7806

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, Physician Assistant, Pulmonary, Pulmonary Fibrosis

Aaron W. Eckhauser, M.D., M.S.C.I

Specialties: Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart Transplant, Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery

Robert R. Fraser, C.C.P.

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery

Eric R. Griffiths, M.D.

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery

Kyle Gubler, PA-C

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Terri M. Hancock, DNP, ACNP-BC

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-5311

Specialties: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Richard E. Kanner, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-7806

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, General Pulmonary, Pulmonary, Pulmonary Function, Pulmonary Rehabilitation

Kristine E. Kokeny, M.D.

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Genitourinary Cancers, Lung Cancer, Radiation Oncology

Antigoni Koliopoulou, M.D.

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery

Ganesh S. Kumpati, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-5311
Veterans Administration Medical Center (801) 582-1565

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery

Thomas Lewis, PA-C

Locations
University Hospital (801) 231-2200

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Julie Bylund Luckart, FNP, APRN, M.S.N.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4266

Specialties: Family Nurse Practitioner, Lung Cancer, Oncology

Stephen McKellar, M.D., M.Sc.

Specialties: Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Revascularization, Heart Failure, Heart Transplant, Lung Transplant, Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery, Valvular Heart Disease

Ryan G. O'Hara, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital
University Hospital (801) 581-8170

Specialties: Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, Interventional Radiology, Kidney Cancer, Liver Biopsies, Liver Cancer, Liver Disease, Liver Transplant, Lung Cancer

Robert Paine III, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-7806

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, Critical Care, General Pulmonary, Pulmonary

Amit N. Patel, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 587-7946

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Clinical Scientist, Coronary Revascularization, Critical Care, Heart Stem Cell Therapy, Heart Transplant, Lung Transplant, Oncology Surgery, Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVI or TAVR), Valvular Heart Disease

Sanjeev M. Raman, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 585-3697
University Hospital (801) 581-7806

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, Critical Care, Lung Transplant, Pulmonary

Mary Beth Scholand, M.D.

Locations
South Jordan Health Center (801) 213-4500
University Hospital (801) 581-7806

Specialties: Advanced Lung Disease, Pulmonary, Pulmonary Fibrosis

Craig H. Selzman, M.D.

Locations
University Hospital (801) 587-9348

Specialties: Adult Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiac Mechanical Support, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Revascularization, Heart Failure, Heart Stem Cell Therapy, Heart Transplant, Lung Transplant, Minimally Invasive Heart Surgery, Surgical Ventricular Restoration, Valvular Heart Disease

Dennis C. Shrieve, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Genitourinary Cancers, Lung Cancer, Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Prostate Cancer, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Nathan C. Sontum, PA-C, M.H.S.

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery

Scott A. Tatum, PA-C

Locations
University Hospital (801) 581-2121

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Thomas K. Varghese Jr., M.D., M.S.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 587-4470

Specialties: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Esophageal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Lung & Esophageal Surgery

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

kim mcaffee neuro oncology-thoracicLung Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Kim McAffee
Phone: 801-587-4470
E-mail: kim.mcaffee@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Asbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers.
  • Exposure to asbestos may increase the risk of asbestosis, other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and other cancers.
  • Smokers who are also exposed to asbestos have a greatly increased risk of lung cancer.
clc graphic right column