Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

skin anatomy

Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin. The skin is the body’s largest organ. It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has several layers, but the two main layers are the epidermis (upper or outer layer) and the dermis (lower or inner layer). Skin cancer begins in the epidermis, which is made up of three kinds of cells:

  • Squamous cells: Thin, flat cells that form the top layer of the epidermis.
  • Basal cells: Round cells under the squamous cells.
  • Melanocytes: Cells that make melanin and are found in the lower part of the epidermis. Melanin is the pigment that gives skin its natural color. When skin is exposed to the sun, melanocytes make more pigment and cause the skin to darken.

Skin cancer can occur anywhere on the body, but it is most common in skin that is often exposed to sunlight, such as the face, neck, hands, and arms.

There are different types of cancer that start in the skin. The most common types are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, which are nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancers rarely spread to other parts of the body. Melanoma is the rarest form of skin cancer. It is more likely to invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Actinic keratosis is a skin condition that is not cancer, but sometimes changes into squamous cell carcinoma. It usually occurs in areas that have been exposed to the sun, such as the face, the back of the hands, and the lower lip. It looks like rough, red, pink, or brown scaly patches on the skin that may be flat or raised, or the lower lip cracks and peels and is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly.

This page is about nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. Find information about melanoma here.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma include the following:

  • Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) over long periods of time.
  • Having a fair complexion, which includes the following:
    • Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not tan, or tans poorly.
    • Blue or green or other light-colored eyes.
    • Red or blond hair.
  • Having actinic keratosis.
  • Past treatment with radiation.
  • Having a weakened immune system.
  • Having certain changes in the genes that are linked to skin cancer.
  • Being exposed to arsenic.

Risk factors for actinic keratosis include the following:

  • Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) over long periods of time.
  • Having a fair complexion, which includes the following:
    • Fair skin that freckles and burns easily, does not tan, or tans poorly.
    • Blue or green or other light-colored eyes.
    • Red or blond hair.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Not all changes in the skin are a sign of nonmelanoma skin cancer or actinic keratosis. Check with your doctor if you notice any changes in your skin.

Possible signs of nonmelanoma skin cancer include the following:

  • A sore that does not heal.
  • Areas of the skin that are:
    • Raised, smooth, shiny, and look pearly.
    • Firm and look like a scar, and may be white, yellow, or waxy.
    • Raised, and red or reddish-brown.
    • Scaly, bleeding or crusty.
Possible signs of actinic keratosis include the following:
  • A rough, red, pink, or brown, raised, scaly patch on the skin that may be flat or raised.
  • Cracking or peeling of the lower lip that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly.

Huntsman Cancer Institute recommends that people examine their skin monthly to get familiar with individual patterns of moles and freckles, and to look for symptoms of cancerous skin changes. If you abnormal changes are found, visit a dermatologist as soon as possible. Learn about HCI's annual free skin cancer screening by calling the G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center at 1-888-424-2100.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Current screening recommendations for skin cancer include the following:

  • A monthly skin self-exam to look for symptoms of cancerous skin changes.
    1. Examine the body from all sides in front of a mirror. Bend the elbows and look carefully at the forearms, upper arms, and palms.
    2. Look at the backs of the legs and feet, the soles, and spaces between the toes.
    3. Examine the back of the neck and scalp with a hand mirror, parting and lifting the hair. Also, check the back, buttocks, and genital area.
  • A yearly skin exam by a dermatologist. Learn about HCI's annual free skin cancer screening by calling the G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center at 1-888-424-2100.

Tests or procedures that examine the skin are used to detect (find) and diagnose nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. The following procedures may be used:

  • Skin exam: A doctor or nurse checks the skin for bumps or spots that look abnormal in color, size, shape, or texture.
  • Skin biopsy: All or part of the abnormal-looking growth is cut from the skin and viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. There are four main types of skin biopsies:
    • Shave biopsy: A sterile razor blade is used to “shave-off” the abnormal-looking growth.
    • Punch biopsy: A special instrument called a punch or a trephine is used to remove a circle of tissue from the abnormal-looking growth.
    • Incisional biopsy: A scalpel is used to remove part of a growth.
    • Excisional biopsy: A scalpel is used to remove the entire growth.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After nonmelanoma skin cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the skin or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the skin or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment.

The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Lymph node biopsy: For squamous cell carcinoma, the lymph nodes may be removed and checked to see if cancer has spread to them.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body:

  • Through tissue. Cancer invades the surrounding normal tissue.
  • Through the lymph system. Cancer invades the lymph system and travels through the lymph vessels to other places in the body.
  • Through the blood. Cancer invades the veins and capillaries and travels through the blood to other places in the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if skin cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually skin cancer cells. The disease is metastatic skin cancer, not lung cancer.

Staging of nonmelanoma skin cancer depends on whether the tumor has certain "high-risk" features and if the tumor is on the eyelid. Staging for nonmelanoma skin cancer that is on the eyelid is different from staging for nonmelanoma skin cancer that affects other parts of the body.

The following are high-risk features for nonmelanoma skin cancer that is not on the eyelid:

  • The tumor is thicker than 2 millimeters.
  • The tumor is described as Clark level IV (has spread into the lower layer of the dermis) or Clark level V (has spread into the layer of fat below the skin).
  • The tumor has grown and spread along nerve pathways.
  • The tumor began on an ear or on a lip that has hair on it.
  • The tumor has cells that look very different from normal cells under a microscope.

The following stages are used for nonmelanoma skin cancer that is not on the eyelid:

Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the squamous cell or basal cell layer of the epidermis (topmost layer of the skin). These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ.

Stage I

In stage I, cancer has formed. The tumor is not larger than 2 centimeters at its widest point and may have one high-risk feature.

Stage II

In stage II, the tumor is either:

  • larger than 2 centimeters at its widest point; or
  • any size and has two or more high-risk features.

Stage III

In stage III:

  • The tumor has spread to the jaw, eye socket, or side of the skull. Cancer may have spread to one lymph node on the same side of the body as the tumor. The lymph node is not larger than 3 centimeters.
    or
  • Cancer has spread to one lymph node on the same side of the body as the tumor. The lymph node is not larger than 3 centimeters and one of the following is true:
    • the tumor is not larger than 2 centimeters at its widest point and may have one high-risk feature; or
    • the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters at its widest point; or
    • the tumor is any size and has two or more high-risk features.

Stage IV

In stage IV, one of the following is true:

  • The tumor is any size and may have spread to the jaw, eye socket, or side of the skull. Cancer has spread to one lymph node on the same side of the body as the tumor and the affected node is larger than 3 centimeters but not larger than 6 centimeters, or cancer has spread to more than one lymph node on one or both sides of the body and the affected nodes are not larger than 6 centimeters; or
  • The tumor is any size and may have spread to the jaw, eye socket, skull, spine, or ribs. Cancer has spread to one lymph node that is larger than 6 centimeters; or
  • The tumor is any size and has spread to the base of the skull, spine, or ribs. Cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes; or
  • Cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the lung.

The following stages are used for nonmelanoma skin cancer on the eyelid:

Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the epidermis (topmost layer of the skin). These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ.

Stage I

Stage I is divided into stages IA, IB, and IC.

  • Stage IA: The tumor is 5 millimeters or smaller and has not spread to the connective tissue of the eyelid or to the edge of the eyelid where the lashes are.
  • Stage IB: The tumor is larger than 5 millimeters but not larger than 10 millimeters or has spread to the connective tissue of the eyelid or to the edge of the eyelid where the lashes are.
  • Stage IC: The tumor is larger than 10 millimeters but not larger than 20 millimeters or has spread through the full thickness of the eyelid.

Stage II

In stage II, one of the following is true:

  • The tumor is larger than 20 millimeters.
  • The tumor has spread to nearby parts of the eye or eye socket.
  • The tumor has spread to spaces around the nerves in the eyelid.

Stage III

Stage III is divided into stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC.

  • Stage IIIA: To remove all of the tumor, the whole eye and part of the optic nerve must be removed. The bone, muscles, fat, and connective tissue around the eye may also be removed.
  • Stage IIIB: The tumor may be anywhere in or near the eye and has spread to nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage IIIC: The tumor has spread to structures around the eye or in the face, or to the brain, and cannot be removed in surgery.

Stage IV

The tumor has spread to distant parts of the body.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, skin cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including dermatologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the skin), medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Five types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

One or more of the following surgical procedures may be used to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer or actinic keratosis:

  • Mohs micrographic surgery: The tumor is cut from the skin in thin layers. During surgery, the edges of the tumor and each layer of tumor removed are viewed through a microscope to check for cancer cells. Layers continue to be removed until no more cancer cells are seen. This type of surgery removes as little normal tissue as possible and is often used to remove skin cancer on the face. Watch our video about Mohs urgery to learn more:

 

  • Simple excision: The tumor is cut from the skin along with some of the normal skin around it.
  • Shave excision: The abnormal area is shaved off the surface of the skin with a small blade.
  • Electrodesiccation and curettage: The tumor is cut from the skin with a curette (a sharp, spoon-shaped tool). A needle-shaped electrode is then used to treat the area with an electric current that stops the bleeding and destroys cancer cells that remain around the edge of the wound. The process may be repeated one to three times during the surgery to remove all of the cancer.
  • Cryosurgery: A treatment that uses an instrument to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue, such as carcinoma in situ. This type of treatment is also called cryotherapy.
  • Laser surgery: A surgical procedure that uses a laser beam (a narrow beam of intense light) as a knife to make bloodless cuts in tissue or to remove a surface lesion such as a tumor.
  • Dermabrasion: Removal of the top layer of skin using a rotating wheel or small particles to rub away skin cells.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). Chemotherapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer and actinic keratosis is usually topical (applied to the skin in a cream or lotion). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the condition being treated.

Retinoids (drugs related to vitamin A) are sometimes used to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

Photodynamic therapy

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment that uses a drug and a certain type of laser light to kill cancer cells. A drug that is not active until it is exposed to light is injected into a vein. The drug collects more in cancer cells than in normal cells. For skin cancer, laser light is shined onto the skin and the drug becomes active and kills the cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy causes little damage to healthy tissue.

Biologic therapy

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.

Interferon and imiquimod are biologic agents used to treat skin cancer. Interferon (by injection) may be used to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Topical imiquimod therapy (a cream applied to the skin) may be used to treat some small basal cell carcinomas.

Clinical trials

These studies discover and evaluate new and improved cancer treatments. Patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors about participating in a clinical trial or any questions regarding research studies. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

There are several places you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services offer emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life to HCI patients and their families.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers many programs to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de piel es una afección por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la piel.

La piel es el órgano más grande del cuerpo. Protege contra el calor, la luz solar, las lesiones y las infecciones. Ayuda también a controlar la temperatura del cuerpo y almacena agua, grasa y vitamina D. La piel tiene varias capas, pero las dos principales son la epidermis (capa superior o externa) y la dermis (capa inferior o interna). El cáncer de piel comienza en la epidermis, que está compuesta por tres tipos de células:

  • Células escamosas: células delgadas y planas que forman la capa superior de la epidermis.
  • Células basales: células redondas debajo de las células escamosas.
  • Melanocitos: células que elaboran melanina y se encuentran en la parte inferior de la epidermis. La melanina es el pigmento que da su color natural a la piel. Cuando la piel está expuesta al sol, los melanocitos fabrican más pigmento y hacen que la piel se oscurezca.

El cáncer de piel se puede presentar en cualquier parte del cuerpo, pero es más común en la piel expuesta a menudo a la luz solar, como la cara, el cuello, las manos y los brazos. 

Hay diferentes tipos de cáncer que empiezan en la piel.

Los tipos más comunes son el carcinoma de células basales y el carcinoma de células escamosas, que son cánceres de piel no melanoma. Estos son cánceres de piel no melanoma. Los cánceres de piel no melanoma se diseminan con muy poca frecuencia hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

  • El carcinoma de células basales es el tipo más común de cáncer de piel. Habitualmente se presenta en áreas de la piel que estuvieron expuestas al sol, más frecuentemente en la nariz. Este tipo de cáncer suele aparecer como un bulto levantado, con aspecto suave, nacarado. Otro tipo tiene aspecto de cicatriz, y es plano y firme y puede ser blanco, amarillo o ceroso. El carcinoma de células basales puede diseminarse a los tejidos que rodean el cáncer, pero generalmente no se disemina hasta otras partes del cuerpo.
  • El carcinoma de células escamosas aparece en áreas de la piel que estuvieron expuestas al sol, como las orejas, el labio inferior y el dorso de las manos. El carcinoma de células escamosas también puede aparecer en áreas de la piel que se quemaron o estuvieron expuestas a sustancias químicas o radiación. Con frecuencia, este tipo de cáncer tiene aspecto de bulto rojo y firme. El tumor es escamoso al tacto, sangra o forma una costra. Los tumores de células escamosas se pueden diseminar hasta los ganglios linfáticos cercanos. El carcinoma de células escamosas que no se diseminó, habitualmente se puede curar.
  • La queratosis actínica es una afección de la piel que no es cáncer, pero que algunas veces se puede convertir en carcinoma de células escamosas. Habitualmente se presenta en áreas que estuvieron expuestas al sol, como la cara, el dorso de las manos y el labio inferior. Tiene aspecto de parches ásperos, de color rojo, rosado o marrón, parches levantados y escamosos sobre la piel y no desaparecen con la aplicación de bálsamo labial o jalea de petróleo.

El melanoma es la forma menos frecuente de cáncer de piel. Es más probable que invada los tejidos cercanos y se disemine hasta otras partes del cuerpo. La queratosis actínica es una afección de la piel que algunas veces se convierte en carcinoma de células escamosas. Este sumario se refiere al tratamiento del cáncer de piel no melanoma y de la queratosis actínica.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumente la probabilidad de padecer de una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a padecer de la enfermedad; no tener un factor de riesgo no significa que no se va a padecer de la enfermedad. Consulte con su médico si piensa que puede estar en riesgo. Los factores de riesgo para el carcinoma de células basales y el carcinoma de células escamosas son los siguientes:

  • Estar expuesto a la luz natural o a la luz artificial (como en las cámaras de bronceado) por tiempo prolongado.
  • Tener piel clara que incluye las siguientes características:
    • Piel clara en la que se forman pecas o se quema fácilmente, no se broncea o se broncea mal.
    • Ojos de color azul o verde, o de otros colores claros.
    • Cabello pelirrojo o rubio.
  • Padecer de queratosis actínica.
  • Haber sido tratado anteriormente con radiación.
  • Tener un sistema inmunitario débil.
  • Tener ciertos cambios en los genes que se relacionan con el cáncer de piel.
  • Estar expuesto al arsénico.

Los factores de riesgo para la queratosis actínica son los siguientes:

  • Estar expuesto a la luz natural o a la luz artificial (como en las cámaras de bronceado) por tiempo prolongado.
  • Tener piel clara que incluye las siguientes características:
    • Piel clara en la que se forman pecas o se quema fácilmente, no se broncea o se broncea mal.
    • Ojos de color azul o verde, o de otros colores claros.
    • Cabello pelirrojo o rubio.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de piel no melanoma y la queratosis actínica suelen aparecer a menudo como un cambio en la piel.

No todos los cambios en la piel son un signo de cáncer de piel no melanoma o de queratosis actínica. Consultar con el médico si se nota cualquier cambio en la piel.

Los signos posibles de cáncer de piel no melanoma son los siguientes:

  • Una herida que no cicatriza.
  • Zonas de la piel que son:
    • Elevadas, lisas, brillantes y con aspecto perlado.
    • Firmes y tienen aspecto de cicatriz; pueden ser blancas, amarillas o marrones.
    • Elevadas y de color rojo o marrón rojizo.
    • Escamosas, sangrantes o con costras.

Los signos posibles de queratosis actínica son los siguientes:

  • Un área áspera en forma de parche, de color rojo, rosado o marrón, levantado o escamoso en la piel que puede ser plana o elevada.
  • Resquebrajamiento o descascaramiento del labio inferior que no mejora con la aplicación de bálsamo labial o jalea de petróleo.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de piel no melanoma y la queratosis actínica, se utilizan pruebas o procedimientos que examinan la piel. Pueden utilizarse los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Examen de la piel: un médico o enfermero examina la piel para determinar la presencia de bultos o manchas con aspecto anormal por su color, tamaño, forma o textura.
  • Biopsia de piel: se extirpa total o parcialmente el crecimiento de apariencia anormal y un patólogo lo observa al microscopio para ver si hay células cancerosas. Hay cuatro tipos principales de biopsias de piel:
    • Biopsia por rasurado: se emplea una hoja de afeitar estéril para "afeitar" el crecimiento de aspecto anormal.
    • Biopsia con sacabocados: se utiliza un instrumento especial que se llama sacabocados o trefina para extirpar un círculo del tejido del crecimiento de aspecto anormal.
    • Biopsia por incisión: se usa un bisturí para extraer parte del tumor.
    • Biopsia por escisión: se utiliza un bisturí para extirpar todo el crecimiento.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticarse el cáncer de piel no melanoma, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de la piel o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro de la piel o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio para planificar el tratamiento.

Las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos se pueden usar en el proceso de estadificación:

  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen de forma más clara. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Biopsia de ganglio linfático : para el carcinoma de células escamosas, se pueden extraer y examinar los ganglios linfáticos para ver si el cáncer se diseminó hasta estos.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de piel se disemina a los pulmones, las células cancerosas en los pulmones son, en realidad, células de cáncer de piel. La enfermedad es cáncer de piel metastásico y no cáncer de pulmón.

La estadificación del cáncer de piel no melanoma depende de muchos factores, uno de ellos es si el tumor presenta características de "riesgo alto" y si el tumor está en el párpado. La estadificación del cáncer de piel no melanoma que está en el párpado es diferente de la estadificación del cáncer de piel no melanoma que afecta otras partes del cuerpo.

Las siguientes características son de riesgo elevado para el cáncer de piel no melanoma que no está en el párpado:

  • El tumor tiene un grosor mayor de 2 milímetros.
  • El tumor se describe como nivel de Clark IV (se diseminó hasta las capas más internas de la dermis) o nivel de Clark V (se diseminó hasta la capa de grasa debajo de la piel).
  • El tumor creció y se diseminó a lo largo de las vías nerviosas.
  • El tumor se formó en una oreja o un labio y tiene vellos.
  • El tumor tiene células que lucen muy diferentes de las normales al microscopio.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el cáncer de piel no melanoma que no está en el párpado:

Estadio 0 (carcinoma in situ)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en la capa de células escamosas o de células basales de la epidermis (la capa superior de la piel). Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse hasta el tejido cercano normal. El estadio 0 también se llama carcinoma in situ.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se formó. El tumor no mide más de dos centímetros en su punto más ancho y puede tener una característica de riesgo alto.

Estadio II

En el estadio II, el tumor es:

  • Mayor de dos centímetros en su punto más ancho; o
  • Tiene cualquier tamaño y presenta dos o más características de riesgo elevado.

Estadio III

En el estadio III:

  • El tumor se diseminó hasta la mandíbula, la cuenca del ojo o un costado del cráneo. El cáncer se puede haber diseminado hasta un ganglio linfático del mismo lado del cuerpo en el que está el tumor. El ganglio linfático no mide más de tres centímetros.

    o
  • El cáncer se diseminó a un ganglio linfático en el mismo lado del cuerpo que el tumor. El ganglio linfático no mide más de tres centímetros y se presenta una de las características siguientes:

    • El tumor no mide más de dos centímetros en su punto más ancho y puede tener una característica de riesgo alto; o
    • El tumor mide más de dos centímetros en su punto más ancho; o
    • El tumor es de cualquier tamaño y presenta dos características o más de riesgo alto.

Estadio IV

En el estadio IV, se presenta una de las siguientes características:

  • El tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y se puede haber diseminado hasta la mandíbula, la cuenca del ojo o un costado del cráneo. El cáncer se diseminó hasta un ganglio linfático en el mismo lado del cuerpo que el tumor y el ganglio afectado mide más de tres centímetros pero no más de seis centímetros o el cáncer se diseminó hasta más de un ganglio linfático en uno o ambos lados del cuerpo, y los ganglios afectados no miden más de seis centímetros;
  • El tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y se puede haber diseminado hasta la mandíbula, la cuenca del ojo, el cráneo, la columna espinal o las costillas. El cáncer se diseminó hasta un ganglio linfático que mide más de seis centímetros; o
  • El tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y se diseminó hasta la base del cráneo, la columna vertebral o las costillas. El cáncer se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos; o
  • El cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo; como el pulmón.

Los siguientes estadios se usan para el cáncer de piel no melanoma de los párpados:

Estadio 0 (carcinoma in situ)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en la epidermis (la capa más exterior de la piel). Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse hacia el tejido normal. El estadio 0 también se llama carcinoma in situ.

Estadio I

El estadio I se divide en los estadios IA, IB y IC.

  • Estadio IA: el tumor mide cinco milímetros o menos, y no se diseminó hasta el tejido conjuntivo del párpado o hasta el borde del párpado donde están las pestañas.
  • Estadio IB: el tumor mide más de cinco milímetros, pero no más de 10 milímetros, o se diseminó hasta el tejido conjuntivo del párpado o hasta el borde del párpado donde están las pestañas.
  • Estadio IC: el tumor mide más de 10 milímetros, pero no más de 20 milímetros, o se diseminó a través de todo el grosor del párpado.

Estadio II

En el estadio II, se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones:

  • El tumor mide más de 20 milímetros.
  • El tumor se diseminó hasta partes cercanas al ojo o la cuenca del ojo.
  • El tumor se diseminó hasta espacios alrededor de los nervios del párpado.

Estadio III

El estadio III se divide en los estadios IIIA, IIIB y IIIC.

  • Estadio IIIA: para extirpar todo el tumor, se deben extirpar todo el ojo y parte del nervio óptico. También se pueden extirpar el hueso, los músculos, la grasa y el tejido conjuntivo alrededor del ojo.
  • Estadio IIIB: el tumor puede estar en cualquier lugar del ojo o cerca del ojo, y se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos cercanos.
  • Estadio IIIC: el tumor se diseminó hasta las estructuras que rodean el ojo o está en la cara, o se diseminó hasta el cerebro, y no se puede extirpar mediante cirugía.

Estadio IV

El tumor se diseminó hasta partes distantes del cuerpo.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes con cáncer de piel no melanoma y queratosis actínica. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente en uso) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un nuevo tratamiento es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes pueden querer pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no comenzaron un tratamiento.

Se usan cinco tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia
  • Terapia fotodinámica
  • Terapia biológica

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

Pueden emplearse uno o más de los siguientes procedimientos quirúrgicos para tratar el cáncer de piel no melanoma o la queratosis actínica:

  • Cirugía micrográfica de Mohs: se recorta el tumor de la piel en capas delgadas. Durante la cirugía, los bordes del tumor y cada capa del tumor extirpada se observan al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Se continúa con la extracción de capas hasta que no se observan más células cancerosas. Con este tipo de cirugía se extrae la menor cantidad posible de tejido normal y se suele utilizar para eliminar cáncer de piel en la cara.
  • Escisión simple: se corta el tumor de la piel junto con parte de la piel normal que lo rodea.
  • Escisión por rasurado: se afeita el área anormal de la superficie de la piel con una hoja de afeitar pequeña.
  • Electrodesecación y curetaje: se corta el tumor de la piel con una cureta (instrumento filoso con forma de cuchara). Luego, se utiliza un electrodo en forma de aguja para tratar el área con una corriente eléctrica que interrumpe la hemorragia y elimina las células cancerosas que quedan alrededor de los bordes de la herida. El proceso se puede repetir de una a 3 veces durante la cirugía para eliminar todo el cáncer.
  • Criocirugía: tratamiento que consiste en el uso de un instrumento para congelar y eliminar el tejidoanormal, como un carcinoma in situ. Este procedimiento también se llama crioterapia.
  • Cirugía láser: procedimiento quirúrgico que utiliza un haz de láser (un rayo de luz estrecho e intenso) como un cuchillo para hacer cortes sin sangrado en el tejido o para extraer una lesión superficial, como, por ejemplo, un tumor.
  • Dermoabrasión: extracción de la capa superior de la piel mediante un disco rotatorio o partículas pequeñas para desgastar las células de la piel.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que utiliza rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía la radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres, que se coloca directamente en el cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y del estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, ya sea mediante su destrucción o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por boca o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a las células cancerosas de todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La quimioterapia para el cáncer de piel no melanoma y la queratosis actínica es habitualmente tópica (se aplica a la piel en forma de crema o loción). La forma de administración de la quimioterapia depende de la afección que se está tratando.

Retinoides (medicamentos relacionados con la vitamina A): se utilizan algunas veces para tratar el carcinoma de células escamosas de piel.

Terapia fotodinámica

La terapia fotodinámica (TFD) es un tratamiento de cáncer que utiliza un medicamento y un tipo específico de rayo láser para eliminar las células cancerosas. Se inyecta en la vena un medicamento que no se activa hasta ser expuesto a la luz. El medicamento se acumula más en las células cancerosas que en las normales. Para el cáncer de piel, la luz láser ilumina la piel y el medicamento se vuelve activo y destruye las células cancerosas. La terapia fotodinámica ocasiona poco daño al tejido sano.

Terapia biológica

La terapia biológica es un tratamiento que usa el sistema inmunitario del paciente para combatir el cáncer. Se utilizan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o producidas en un laboratorio para impulsar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra el cáncer. Este tipo de tratamiento del cáncer también se llama bioterapia o inmunoterapia.

El interferón y el imiquimod son sustancias biológicas que se usan para tratar el cáncer de piel. El interferón (inyectado) se puede usar para tratar algunos pequeños carcinomas de células escamosas de piel. La terapia tópica con imiquimod (crema aplicada sobre la piel) se puede usar para tratar algunos pequeños carcinomas de células basales.

Ensayos clínicos

Muchos de los tratamientos estándar actuales se basan en ensayos clínicos anteriores. Los pacientes que participan en un ensayo clínico pueden recibir el tratamiento estándar o estar entre los primeros en recibir el tratamiento nuevo.

Los pacientes que participan en los ensayos clínicos también ayudan a mejorar la forma en que se tratará el cáncer en el futuro. Aunque los ensayos clínicos no conduzcan a tratamientos nuevos eficaces, a menudo responden a preguntas importantes y ayudan a avanzar en la investigación. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Robert Hans Ingemar Andtbacka, M.D., C.M.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 587-8808

Specialties: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Oncology, Oncology Surgery, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery, Soft Tissue Sarcomas, Surgery, General

Glen M. Bowen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery

Keith Duffy, M.D.

Locations
Dermatology & Laser Center (801) 581-2955
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 581-2955
Redstone Health Center (435) 658-9262
South Jordan Health Center (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Dermatopathology, General Dermatology, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery

Mark J. Eliason, M.D.

Locations
Dermatology Murray Clinic (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Allergic Skin Diseases, Dermatology, General Dermatology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology

Douglas Grossman, Ph.D., M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Dermatology, Melanoma Surgery, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology

Mark A. Hyde, M.M.Sc., P.A.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0206

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery, Physician Assistant

Payam Tristani-Firouzi, M.D.

Locations
Dermatology & Laser Center (801) 581-2955
Dermatology Murray Clinic (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Dermatology, Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery

David A. Wada, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2955
University Hospital (801) 581-2955

Specialties: Cutaneous Lymphoma, Dermatology, Dermatopathology, Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Pediatric Diseases and Conditions
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

travis hakala skin cancer Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program
Care coordinator: Travis Hakala
Phone: 801-585-0209
E-mail:travis.hakala@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • A person will sunburn 30% faster in Salt Lake City than in Los Angeles. This is because the UV intensity is much greater at Salt Lake City's high altitude.
  • For best skin protection, look for a broad-spectrum sunblock that contains zinc oxide or titanium dioxide with an SPF 30 or higher.
  • Huntsman Cancer Institute offers an annual free skin cancer screening. Call the Cancer Learning Center at 1-888-424-2100 for more information.
clc graphic right column