Ovarian Cancer

female reproductive systemOvarian epithelial cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissue covering the ovary. The ovaries are a pair of organs in the female reproductive system. They are in the pelvis, one on each side of the uterus (the hollow, pear-shaped organ where a fetus grows). Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond. The ovaries make eggs and female hormones (chemicals that control the way certain cells or organs work).

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Women who have one first-degree relative (mother, daughter, or sister) with ovarian cancer are at an increased risk of ovarian cancer. This risk is higher in women who have one first-degree relative and one second-degree relative (grandmother or aunt) with ovarian cancer. This risk is even higher in women who have two or more first-degree relatives with ovarian cancer. Learn more from our Family Cancer Assessment Clinic.

Some ovarian cancers are caused by inherited gene mutations (changes). The genes in cells carry the hereditary information that is received from a person’s parents. Hereditary ovarian cancer makes up about 5% to 10% of all cases of ovarian cancer. Three hereditary patterns have been identified: ovarian cancer alone, ovarian and breast cancers, and ovarian and colon cancers.

There are tests that can detect mutated genes. These genetic tests are sometimes done for members of families with a high risk of cancer. Women with an increased risk of ovarian cancer may consider surgery to prevent it. Some women who have an increased risk of ovarian cancer may choose to have a prophylactic oophorectomy (the removal of healthy ovaries so that cancer cannot grow in them). In high-risk women, this procedure has been shown to greatly decrease the risk of ovarian cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Early ovarian cancer may not cause any symptoms. When symptoms do appear, ovarian cancer is often advanced. Symptoms of ovarian cancer may include the following:

  • Pain or swelling in the abdomen.
  • Pain in the pelvis.
  • Gastrointestinal problems, such as gas, bloating, or constipation.

These symptoms also may be caused by other conditions and not by ovarian cancer. If the symptoms get worse or do not go away on their own, check with your doctor so that any problem can be diagnosed and treated as early as possible. When found in its early stages, ovarian epithelial cancer can often be cured.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the ovaries and pelvic area are used to detect (find) and diagnose ovarian cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Pelvic exam: An exam of the vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and rectum. The doctor or nurse inserts one or two lubricated, gloved fingers of one hand into the vagina and the other hand is placed over the lower abdomen to feel the size, shape, and position of the uterus and ovaries. A speculum is also inserted into the vagina and the doctor or nurse looks at the vagina and cervix for signs of disease. A Pap test or Pap smear of the cervix is usually done. The doctor or nurse also inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the rectum to feel for lumps or abnormal areas.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs, such as the abdomen, and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. The picture can be printed to be looked at later. Other patients may have a transvaginal ultrasound.
  • CA 125 assay: A test that measures the level of CA 125 in the blood. CA 125 is a substance released by cells into the bloodstream. An increased CA 125 level is sometimes a sign of cancer or other condition.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A very small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. The tissue is usually removed during surgery to remove the tumor.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After ovarian cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the ovaries or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out whether cancer has spread within the ovaries or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The results of the tests used to diagnose ovarian cancer are often also used to stage the disease.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body. Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body. When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if ovarian epithelial cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually ovarian epithelial cancer cells. The disease is metastatic ovarian epithelial cancer, not lung cancer.

The following stages are used for ovarian epithelial cancer:

Stage I

In stage I, cancer is found in one or both ovaries. Stage I is divided into stage IA, stage IB, and stage IC.

  • Stage IA: Cancer is found inside a single ovary.
  • Stage IB: Cancer is found inside both ovaries.
  • Stage IC: Cancer is found inside one or both ovaries and one of the following is true:
    • cancer is also found on the outside surface of one or both ovaries; or
    • the capsule (outer covering) of the ovary has ruptured (broken open); or
    • cancer cells are found in the fluid of the peritoneal cavity (the body cavity that contains most of the organs in the abdomen) or in washings of the peritoneum (tissue lining the peritoneal cavity).

Stage II

In stage II, cancer is found in one or both ovaries and has spread into other areas of the pelvis. Stage II is divided into stage IIA, stage IIB, and stage IIC.

  • Stage IIA: Cancer has spread to the uterus and/or the fallopian tubes (the long slender tubes through which eggs pass from the ovaries to the uterus).
  • Stage IIB: Cancer has spread to other tissue within the pelvis.
  • Stage IIC: Cancer is found in one or both ovaries and has spread to the uterus and/or fallopian tubes, or to other tissue within the pelvis. Also, one of the following is true:
    • cancer is also found on the outside surface of one or both ovaries; or
    • the capsule (outer covering) of the ovary has ruptured (broken open); or
    • cancer cells are found in the fluid of the peritoneal cavity (the body cavity that contains most of the organs in the abdomen) or in washings of the peritoneum (tissue lining the peritoneal cavity).

Stage III

In stage III, cancer is found in one or both ovaries and has spread outside the pelvis to other parts of the abdomen and/or nearby lymph nodes. Stage III is divided into stage IIIA, stage IIIB, and stage IIIC.

  • Stage IIIA: The tumor is found in the pelvis only, but cancer cells that can be seen only with a microscope have spread to the surface of the peritoneum (tissue that lines the abdominal wall and covers most of the organs in the abdomen), the small intestines, or the tissue that connects the small intestines to the wall of the abdomen.
  • Stage IIIB: Cancer has spread to the peritoneum and the cancer in the peritoneum is 2 centimeters or smaller.
  • Stage IIIC: Cancer has spread to the peritoneum and the cancer in the peritoneum is larger than 2 centimeters and/or cancer has spread to lymph nodes in the abdomen.

Cancer that has spread to the surface of the liver is also considered stage III ovarian cancer.

Stage IV

In stage IV, cancer has spread beyond the abdomen to other parts of the body, such as the lungs or tissue inside the liver. Cancer cells in the fluid around the lungs is also considered stage IV ovarian cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, ovarian cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including gynecologic oncologists (doctors who specialize in cancers of the female reproductive system), surgeons, radiation oncologists, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with ovarian epithelial cancer. Some treatments are standard, and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the treatment currently used as standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Three kinds of standard treatment are used. These include the following:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Most patients have surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible. Different types of surgery may include:

  • Hysterectomy: Surgery to remove the uterus and, sometimes, the cervix. When only the uterus is removed, it is called a partial hysterectomy. When both the uterus and the cervix are removed, it is called a total hysterectomy. If the uterus and cervix are taken out through the vagina, the operation is called a vaginal hysterectomy. If the uterus and cervix are taken out through a large incision (cut) in the abdomen, the operation is called a total abdominal hysterectomy. If the uterus and cervix are taken out through a small incision (cut) in the abdomen using a laparoscope, the operation is called a total laparoscopic hysterectomy.
  • Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy: A surgical procedure to remove one ovary and one fallopian tube.
  • Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy: A surgical procedure to remove both ovaries and both fallopian tubes.
  • Omentectomy: A surgical procedure to remove the omentum (a piece of the tissue lining the abdominal wall).
  • Lymph node biopsy: The removal of all or part of a lymph node. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Some women receive a treatment called intraperitoneal radiation therapy, in which radioactive liquid is put directly in the abdomen through a catheter.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy).

A type of regional chemotherapy used to treat ovarian cancer is intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy. In IP chemotherapy, the anticancer drugs are carried directly into the peritoneal cavity (the space that contains the abdominal organs) through a thin tube.

Treatment with more than one anticancer drug is called combination chemotherapy. The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more in our Introduction to Chemotherapy video:

 

Clinical trials

This section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. Learn more from our clinical trials website.

  • Biologic therapy: This treatment uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.
  • Targeted therapy: This treatment uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a type of targeted therapy that uses antibodies made in the laboratory, from a single type of immune system cell. These antibodies can identify substances on cancer cells or normal substances that may help cancer cells grow. The antibodies attach to the substances and kill the cancer cells, block their growth, or keep them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry drugs, toxins, or radioactive material directly to cancer cells. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody being studied in treating ovarian epithelial cancer. PARP inhibitors are targeted therapy drugs that block DNA repair and may cause cancer cells to die. PARP inhibitor therapy is being studied in treating ovarian epithelial cancer that remains after chemotherapy.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer epitelial de ovarios es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en el tejido que cubre el ovario.

Los ovarios son un par de órganos en el aparato reproductor femenino. Están en la pelvis, uno a cada lado del útero (el órgano hueco, en forma de pera donde se forma el feto). Cada ovario tiene aproximadamente el tamaño y la forma de una almendra. Los ovarios producen óvulos y hormonas femeninas (sustancias químicas que controlan el funcionamiento de ciertas células y órganos).

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Las mujeres con antecedentes familiares de cáncer de ovario tienen mayor riesgo de este cáncer. Todo lo que aumente el riesgo de presentar una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. El riesgo aumenta en mujeres que tienen un pariente de primer grado (madre, hija o hermana) con cáncer de ovario. Este riesgo es más alto en mujeres con una pariente de primer grado y una pariente de segundo grado (abuela o tía) que tienen este tipo de cáncer. El riesgo es incluso mayor en mujeres con dos o más parientas de primer grado que tienen cáncer de ovario. 

Algunos cánceres de este tipo lo ocasionan mutaciones (cambios) genéticas hereditarias. Los genes en las células transportan la información hereditaria que recibe una persona de los padres. El cáncer de ovario hereditario representa alrededor de 5 a 10% de todos los casos de este tipo de cáncer. Se identificaron tres estructuras hereditarias: cáncer de ovario solo, cánceres de ovario y mama y cáncer de colon.

Hay pruebas que pueden encontrar genes mutados. Estas pruebas genéticas se realizan a veces para miembros de familias con alto riesgo de enfermar de cáncer.

Las mujeres con mayor riesgo de cáncer de ovario pueden pensar en operarse como una forma de prevención. Algunas mujeres que tienen mayor riesgo de enfermar de cáncer de ovario pueden optar por una ooforectomía profiláctica (extirpación de ovarios sanos de manera que el cáncer no pueda crecer en ellos). En las mujeres con riesgo alto, este procedimiento mostró que puede disminuir enormemente el riesgo de cáncer de ovario.

Apreda más sobre la prevención del cáncer de ovario.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de ovario en estadio temprano puede no causar síntoma alguno. Cuando los síntomas aparecen, el cáncer de ovario a menudo se encuentra avanzado. Los síntomas del cáncer de ovario pueden ser los siguientes:

  • Dolor o hinchazón en el abdomen.
  • Dolor en la pelvis.
  • Problemas gastrointestinales tales como gases, flatulencia o estreñimiento.

Estos síntomas pueden obedecer a otras afecciones y no al cáncer de ovario. Si los síntomas empeoran o no desaparecen espontáneamente, consulte con su médico de modo que se pueda diagnosticar y tratar cualquier problema lo más pronto posible. Cuando se encuentra en sus estadios tempranos, el cáncer epitelial de ovarios se puede curar.

Las mujeres con cáncer de ovario en cualquiera de sus estadios podrían considerar participar en un ensayo clínico.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para identificar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de ovario, se utilizan pruebas que examinan los ovariosy el área de la pelvis. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para revisar el estado general de salud e identificar cualquier signo de enfermedad, como masas o cualquier otra cosa que parezca extraña. También se toman datos sobre los hábitos de salud del paciente, así como los antecedentes de enfermedades y los tratamientos aplicados en cada caso.
  • Examen pélvico: examen de la vagina, el cuello uterino, el útero, las trompas de Falopio, los ovarios y el recto. El médico o enfermero introducen uno o dos dedos cubiertos por guantes lubricados en la vagina mientras con la otra mano sobre la parte inferior del abdomen palpan el tamaño, la forma y la posición del útero y los ovarios. También se introduce un espéculo en la vagina y el médico o enfermero observan la vagina y cuello uterino para detectar cualquier señal de enfermedad. Habitualmente se lleva a cabo una prueba de Pap o frotis de Papanicolaou del cuello uterino. El médico o el enfermero también introducen un dedo enguantado y lubricado en el recto para palpar masas o áreas anormales.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento en el cual se hacen rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasónicas) en tejidos u órganos internos, como el abdomen, y se crean ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama ecograma. La imagen se puede imprimir para analizarla más adelante. Otros pacientes se pueden someter a una ecografía transvaginal.
  • Ensayo de CA-125: prueba que se utiliza para medir la concentración de CA 125 en la sangre. CA 125 es una sustancia que liberan las células en el torrente sanguíneo. Una concentración elevada de CA 125 puede ser algunas veces un signo de cáncer u otra afección.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar en una vena o dar para beber un tinte para ayudar a que los órganos o tejidos aparezcan más claros. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El escáner de la TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y huesos del interior del tórax. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos para que un patólogo las estudie bajo un microscopio para determinar si hay signos de cáncer. Habitualmente, se extrae el tejido durante la cirugía para extirpar el tumor.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de un diagnóstico de cáncer de ovario, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de los ovarios o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso que se utiliza para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro de los ovarios o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información reunida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante conocer el estadio a fin de planificar el tratamiento. Los resultados de las pruebas usadas para diagnosticar el cáncer de ovario a menudo se utilizan para estadificar la enfermedad.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer epitelial del ovario se disemina a los pulmones, las células cancerosas de los pulmones son de hecho células cáncerosas epiteliales del ovario. La enfermedad es cáncer epitelial de ovarios metastásico.

Se utilizan los siguientes estadios para el cáncer epitelial de ovarios:

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se encuentra en uno o en ambos ovarios. El estadio I se divide en estadio IA, estadio IB y estadio IC:

  • Estadio IA. El cáncer se encuentra en un solo ovario.
  • Estadio IB. El cáncer se encuentra en ambos ovarios.
  • Estadio IC. El cáncer se encuentra en uno o ambos ovarios y se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones:
    • El cáncer se encuentra también en la superficie exterior de uno o de ambos ovarios, o
    • La cápsula (revestimiento exterior) del ovario se rompió (se abrió); o
    • se encuentran células cancerosas en el líquido de la cavidad peritoneal (la cavidad del cuerpo que contiene la mayoría de los órganos del abdomen) o en los lavados del peritoneo (tejido que reviste la cavidad peritoneal)

Estadio II

En el estadio II, el cáncer se encuentra en uno o ambos ovarios y se diseminó hasta otras áreas de la pelvis. El estadio II se divide en estadio IIA, estadio IIB y estadio IIC:

  • Estadio IIA. El cáncer se diseminó hasta el útero o las trompas de Falopio (tubos largos y delgados por los cuales pasan los óvulos desde los ovarios hasta el útero).
  • Estadio IIB. El cáncer se diseminó hasta otro tejido dentro de la pelvis.
  • Estadio IIC. El cáncer se encuentra en uno o ambos ovarios, y se diseminó hasta el útero o las trompas de Falopio, o hasta otro tejido dentro de la pelvis. También se presenta una de las siguientes situaciones:
    • El cáncer también se encuentra fuera de la superficie de uno o ambos ovarios; o
    • La cápsula (revestimiento exterior) del ovario se rompió (se abrió); o
    • Las células cancerosas se encuentran en el líquido de la cavidad peritoneal (cavidad del cuerpo que contiene la mayoría de los órganos del abdomen) o en los lavados del peritoneo (tejido que reviste la cavidad peritoneal).

Estadio III

En el estadio III, el cáncer se encuentra en uno o ambos ovarios y se diseminó fuera de la pelvis hasta otras partes del abdomen o los ganglios linfáticos cercanos. El estadio III se divide en estadio IIIA, estadio IIIB y estadio IIIC:

  • Estadio IIIA: el tumor se encuentra solo en la pelvis, pero las células cancerosas que solo se pueden observar mediante un microscopio se diseminaron hasta la superficie del peritoneo (tejido que reviste la pared abdominal y cubre la mayoría de los órganos del abdomen), el intestino delgado o el tejido que conecta el intestino delgado con la pared abdominal.
  • Estadio IIIB: el cáncer se diseminó hasta el peritoneo y el cáncer en el peritoneo mide dos centímetros o menos.
  • Estadio IIIC: el cáncer se diseminó hasta el peritoneo y el cáncer en el peritoneo mide más de dos centímetros, o el cáncer se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos del abdomen.

El cáncer que se diseminó hasta la superficie del hígado también se considera cáncer de ovario en estadio III.

Estadio IV

En el estadio IV, el cáncer se diseminó más allá del abdomen hasta otras partes del cuerpo, como los pulmones o el tejido interno del hígado. Las células cancerosas en el líquido que rodea los pulmones también se consideran cáncer de ovario en estadio IV.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de cáncer epitelial de ovarios. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente en uso) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Las pacientes pueden considerar participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan tres tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La mayoría de las pacientes se someten a cirugía para extirpar la mayor cantidad posible de tumor. Los diferentes tipos de cirugía pueden incluir los siguientes:

  • Histerectomía: cirugía para extirpar el útero y algunas veces el cuello uterino. Cuando solo se extirpa el útero, se llama histerectomía parcial. Cuando se extirpan el útero y el cuello uterino, se llama histerectomía total. Si el útero y el cuello uterino se retiran por la vagina, la operación se llama histerectomía vaginal. Si el útero y el cuello uterino se retiran mediante una incisión (corte) grande en el abdomen, la cirugía se llama histerectomía abdominal total. Si el útero y el cuello uterino se extraen a través de una incisión (corte) pequeña en el abdomen utilizando un laparoscopio, la cirugía se llama histerectomía laparoscópica total.
  • Salpingooforectomía unilateral: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar un ovario y una trompa de Falopio.
  • Salpingooforectomía bilateral: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar ambos ovarios y ambas trompas de Falopio.
  • Omentectomía: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar el epiplón (pedazo del tejido que reviste la pared abdominal).
  • Biopsia de ganglio linfático: extracción total o parcial de un ganglio linfático. Un patólogo observa el tejido bajo un microscopio para identificar células cancerosas.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el que se utilizan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. Para la radioterapia externa, se utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo que envía rayos hacia el cáncer. Para la radioterapia interna, se utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres que se colocan directamente en el cáncer o cerca de este. La forma en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Algunas mujeres reciben un tratamiento que se llama radioterapia intraperitoneal, para la que se coloca un líquido radiactivo directamente en el abdomen a través de un catéter.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento de cáncer para el que se utiliza medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, mediante su destrucción o evitando su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra oralmente o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y afectan a células cancerosas en todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional).

La quimioterapia intraperitoneal (IP) es un tipo de quimioterapia regional que se utiliza para tratar el cáncer de ovario. Para la quimioterapia IP, los medicamentos contra el cáncer se llevan directamente hasta la cavidad peritoneal (el espacio que contiene los órganos abdominales) a través de un tubo delgado.

El tratamiento con más de un medicamento contra el cáncer se llama quimioterapia combinada.

La forma en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

La terapia biológica es un tratamiento para el que se utiliza el sistema inmunitario del paciente para combatir el cáncer. Se utilizan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o producidas en el laboratorio para reforzar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra el cáncer. Este tipo de tratamiento del cáncer también se llama bioterapia o inmunoterapia.

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento para el que se utilizan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales.

La terapia con anticuerpos monoclonales es un tipo de terapia dirigida para la que se usan anticuerpos producidos en el laboratorio a partir de un solo tipo de célula del sistema inmunitario. Estos anticuerpos pueden identificar sustancias en las células cancerosas o sustancias normales que pueden ayudar a las células cancerosas a crecer. Los anticuerpos se adhieren a dichas sustancias y destruyen las células cancerosas, impiden su crecimiento o previenen que se diseminen. Los anticuerpos monoclonales se administran por medio de una infusión y se pueden usar solos o para trasportar medicamentos, toxinas o material radiactivo directamente hasta las células cancerosas.

El bevacizumab es un anticuerpo monoclonal que está bajo estudio para el tratamiento del cáncer epitelial de ovarios.

Los inhibidores PARP son medicamentos para terapia dirigida que impiden la reparación del ADN y pueden destruir las células cancerosas. El tratamiento con inhibidores del PARP está en estudio para el tratamiento del cáncer epitelial de ovario que queda después de la quimioterapia.

Muchos de los tratamientos estándar actuales se basan en ensayos clínicos anteriores. Los pacientes que participan en un ensayo clínico pueden recibir el tratamiento estándar o estar entre los primeros en recibir el tratamiento nuevo.

Los pacientes que participan en los ensayos clínicos también ayudan a mejorar la forma en que se tratará el cáncer en el futuro. Aunque los ensayos clínicos no conduzcan a tratamientos nuevos eficaces, a menudo responden a preguntas importantes y ayudan a avanzar en la investigación.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Interactive Tools
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

 

Make An Appointment

keri patterson make an appointment

Gynecology Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Sarai Rivera
Phone: 801-587-4399
E-mail: sarai.rivera@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • An ovarian cyst is a growth that contains fluid and sometimes small amounts of solid tissue too. Most ovarian cysts are benign (not cancer).
  • Gynecologic oncologists are the best type of doctor to treat ovarian cancer. They specialize in cancers of the female reproductive system.

 

clc graphic right column