Prostate Cancer

male reproductive systemProstate cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the prostate.

The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system. It lies just below the bladder (the organ that collects and empties urine) and in front of the rectum (the lower part of the intestine). It is about the size of a walnut and surrounds part of the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the bladder). The prostate gland makes fluid that is part of the semen.

Prostate cancer is found mainly in older men. In the U.S., about 1 out of 5 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support 

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by prostate cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Weak or interrupted ("stop-and-go") flow of urine
  • Sudden urge to urinate
  • Frequent urination (especially at night)
  • Trouble starting the flow of urine
  • Trouble emptying the bladder completely
  • Pain or burning while urinating
  • Blood in the urine or semen
  • A pain in the back, hips, or pelvis that doesn't go away
  • Shortness of breath, feeling very tired, fast heartbeat, dizziness, or pale skin caused by anemia

Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. As men age, the prostate may get bigger and block the urethra or bladder. This may cause trouble urinating or sexual problems. The condition is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and although it is not cancer, surgery may be needed. The symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia or of other problems in the prostate may be like symptoms of prostate cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the prostate and blood are used to detect (find) and diagnose prostate cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Digital rectal exam (DRE): An exam of the rectum. The doctor or nurse inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the rectum and feels the prostate through the rectal wall for lumps or abnormal areas.
  • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test: A test that measures the level of PSA in the blood. PSA is a substance made by the prostate that may be found in an increased amount in the blood of men who have prostate cancer. PSA levels may also be high in men who have an infection or inflammation of the prostate or BPH (an enlarged, but noncancerous, prostate).
  • Transrectal ultrasound: A procedure in which a probe that is about the size of a finger is inserted into the rectum to check the prostate. The probe is used to bounce high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. Transrectal ultrasound may be used during a biopsy procedure.
  • Transrectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A procedure that uses a strong magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. A probe that gives off radio waves is inserted into the rectum near the prostate. This helps the MRI machine make clearer pictures of the prostate and nearby tissue. A transrectal MRI is done to find out if the cancer has spread outside the prostate into nearby tissues. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist. The pathologist will check the tissue sample to see if there are cancer cells and find out the Gleason score. The Gleason score ranges from 2-10 and describes how likely it is that a tumor will spread. The lower the number, the less likely the tumor is to spread. A transrectal biopsy is used to diagnose prostate cancer. A transrectal biopsy is the removal of tissue from the prostate by inserting a thin needle through the rectum and into the prostate. This procedure is usually done using transrectal ultrasound to help guide where samples of tissue are taken from. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After prostate cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the prostate or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the prostate or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The results of the tests used to diagnose prostate cancer are often also used to stage the disease. In prostate cancer, staging tests may not be done unless the patient has symptoms or signs that the cancer has spread, such as bone pain, a high PSA level, or a high Gleason score.

The following tests and procedures also may be used in the staging process

  • Bone scan: A procedure to check if there are rapidly dividing cells, such as cancer cells, in the bone. A very small amount of radioactive material is injected into a vein and travels through the bloodstream. The radioactive material collects in the bones and is detected by a scanner.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Pelvic lymphadenectomy: A surgical procedure to remove the lymph nodes in the pelvis. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells.
  • Seminal vesicle biopsy: The removal of fluid from the seminal vesicles (glands that make semen) using a needle. A pathologist views the fluid under a microscope to look for cancer cells.
  • ProstaScint scan: A procedure to check for cancer that has spread from the prostate to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes. A very small amount of radioactive material is injected into a vein and travels through the bloodstream. The radioactive material attaches to prostate cancer cells and is detected by a scanner. The radioactive material shows up as a bright spot on the picture in areas where there are a lot of prostate cancer cells.

The stage of the cancer is based on the results of the staging and diagnostic tests, including the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and the Gleason score. The tissue samples removed during the biopsy are used to find out the Gleason score. The Gleason score ranges from 2-10 and describes how different the cancer cells look from normal cells and how likely it is that the tumor will spread. The lower the number, the less likely the tumor is to spread.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body. When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if prostate cancer spreads to the bone, the cancer cells in the bone are actually prostate cancer cells. The disease is metastatic prostate cancer, not bone cancer.

The following stages are used for prostate cancer:

Stage I

In stage I, cancer is found in the prostate only. The cancer:

  • is found by needle biopsy (done for a high PSA level) or in a small amount of tissue during surgery for other reasons (such as benign prostatic hyperplasia). The PSA level is lower than 10 and the Gleason score is 6 or lower; or
  • is found in one-half or less of one lobe of the prostate. The PSA level is lower than 10 and the Gleason score is 6 or lower; or
  • cannot be felt during a digital rectal exam and cannot be seen in imaging tests. Cancer is found in one-half or less of one lobe of the prostate. The PSA level and the Gleason score are not known.

Stage II

In stage II, cancer is more advanced than in stage I, but has not spread outside the prostate. Stage II is divided into stages IIA and IIB.

In stage IIA, cancer:

  • is found by needle biopsy (done for a high PSA level) or in a small amount of tissue during surgery for other reasons (such as benign prostatic hyperplasia). The PSA level is lower than 20 and the Gleason score is 7; or
  • is found by needle biopsy (done for a high PSA level) or in a small amount of tissue during surgery for other reasons (such as benign prostatic hyperplasia). The PSA level is at least 10 but lower than 20 and the Gleason score is 6 or lower; or
  • is found in one-half or less of one lobe of the prostate. The PSA level is at least 10 but lower than 20 and the Gleason score is 6 or lower; or
  • is found in one-half or less of one lobe of the prostate. The PSA level is lower than 20 and the Gleason score is 7; or
  • is found in more than one-half of one lobe of the prostate.

In stage IIB, cancer:

  • is found in opposite sides of the prostate. The PSA can be any level and the Gleason score can range from 2 to 10; or
  • cannot be felt during a digital rectal exam and cannot be seen in imaging tests. The PSA level is 20 or higher and the Gleason score can range from 2 to 10; or
  • cannot be felt during a digital rectal exam and cannot be seen in imaging tests. The PSA can be any level and the Gleason score is 8 or higher.

Stage III

In stage III, cancer has spread beyond the outer layer of the prostate and may have spread to the seminal vesicles. The PSA can be any level and the Gleason score can range from 2 to 10.

Stage IV

In stage IV, the PSA can be any level and the Gleason score can range from 2 to 10. Also, cancer:

  • has spread beyond the seminal vesicles to nearby tissue or organs, such as the rectum, bladder, or pelvic wall; or
  • may have spread to the seminal vesicles or to nearby tissue or organs, such as the rectum, bladder, or pelvic wall. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes; or
  • has spread to distant parts of the body, which may include lymph nodes or bones. Prostate cancer often spreads to the bones.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, prostate cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including urologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the urinary system), surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with prostate cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Seven types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Watchful waiting or Active Surveillance

Watchful waiting and active surveillance are treatments used for older men who do not have signs or symptoms or have other medical conditions and for men whose prostate cancer is found during a screening test.

Watchful waiting is closely monitoring a patient’s condition without giving any treatment until signs or symptoms appear or change. Treatment is given to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

Active surveillance is closely following a patient's condition without giving any treatment unless there are changes in test results. It is used to find early signs that the condition is getting worse. In active surveillance, patients are given certain exams and tests, including digital rectal exam, PSA test, transrectal ultrasound, and transrectal needle biopsy, to check if the cancer is growing. When the cancer begins to grow, treatment is given to cure the cancer.

Surgery

Patients in good health whose tumor is in the prostate gland only may be treated with surgery to remove the tumor. The following types of surgery are used:

  • Radical prostatectomy: A surgical procedure to remove the prostate, surrounding tissue, and seminal vesicles. There are two types of radical prostatectomy:
    • Retropubic prostatectomy: A surgical procedure to remove the prostate through an incision (cut) in the abdominal wall. Removal of nearby lymph nodes may be done at the same time.
    • Perineal prostatectomy: A surgical procedure to remove the prostate through an incision (cut) made in the perineum (area between the scrotum and anus). Nearby lymph nodes may also be removed through a separate incision in the abdomen.
  • Pelvic lymphadenectomy: A surgical procedure to remove the lymph nodes in the pelvis. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells. If the lymph nodes contain cancer, the doctor will not remove the prostate and may recommend other treatment.
  • Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP): A surgical procedure to remove tissue from the prostate using a resectoscope (a thin, lighted tube with a cutting tool) inserted through the urethra. This procedure is done to treat benign prostatic hypertrophy and it is sometimes done to relieve symptoms caused by a tumor before other cancer treatment is given. TURP may also be done in men whose tumor is in the prostate only and who cannot have a radical prostatectomy.

In some cases, nerve-sparing surgery can be done. This type of surgery may save the nerves that control erection. However, men with large tumors or tumors that are very close to the nerves may not be able to have this surgery.

Possible problems after prostate cancer surgery include the following:

  • Impotence
  • Leakage of urine from the bladder or stool from the rectum
  • Shortening of the penis (1 to 2 centimeters). The exact reason for this is not known.
  • Inguinal hernia (bulging of fat or part of the small intestine through weak muscles into the groin). Inguinal hernia may occur more often in men treated with radical prostatectomy than in men who have some other types of prostate surgery, radiation therapy, or prostate biopsy alone. It is most likely to occur within the first 2 years after radical prostatectomy.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are different types of radiation therapy.

  • External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Conformal radiation is a type of external radiation therapy that uses a computer to create a 3-dimensional (3-D) picture of the tumor. The radiation beams are shaped to fit the tumor.
  • Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. In early-stage prostate cancer, the radioactive seeds are placed in the prostate using needles that are inserted through the skin between the scrotum and rectum. The placement of the radioactive seeds in the prostate is guided by images from transrectal ultrasound or computed tomography (CT). The needles are removed after the radioactive seeds are placed in the prostate. Learn more in our patient education factsheets about internal radiation for prostate cancer:
  • Alpha emitter radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance to treat prostate cancer that has spread to the bone. A radioactive substance called radium-223 is injected into a vein and travels through the bloodstream. The radium-223 collects in areas of bone with cancer and kills the cancer cells.
The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Men treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer have an increased risk of having bladder and/or gastrointestinal cancer. Radiation therapy can cause impotence and urinary problems.

Hormone therapy

Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment that removes hormones or blocks their action and stops cancer cells from growing. Hormones are substances made by glands in the body and circulated in the bloodstream. In prostate cancer, male sex hormones can cause prostate cancer to grow. Drugs, surgery, or other hormones are used to reduce the amount of male hormones or block them from working.

Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may include the following:

  • Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists can stop the testicles from making testosterone. Examples are leuprolide, goserelin, and buserelin.
  • Antiandrogens can block the action of androgens (hormones that promote male sex characteristics), such as testosterone. Examples are flutamide, bicalutamide, enzalutamide, and nilutamide.
  • Drugs that can prevent the adrenal glands from making androgens include ketoconazole and aminoglutethimide.
  • Orchiectomy is a surgical procedure to remove one or both testicles, the main source of male hormones, such as testosterone, to decrease the amount of hormone being made.
  • Estrogens (hormones that promote female sex characteristics) can prevent the testicles from making testosterone. However, estrogens are seldom used today in the treatment of prostate cancer because of the risk of serious side effects.

Hot flashes, impaired sexual function, loss of desire for sex, and weakened bones may occur in men treated with hormone therapy. Other side effects include diarrhea, nausea, and itching.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.. Learn more about this treatment in our Introduction to Chemotherapy video:

 

Biologic therapy

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. Sipuleucel-T is a type of biologic therapy used to treat prostate cancer that has metastasized (spread to other parts of the body).

Bisphosphonate therapy

Bisphosphonate drugs, such as clodronate or zoledronate, reduce bone disease when cancer has spread to the bone. Men who are treated with antiandrogen therapy or orchiectomy are at an increased risk of bone loss. In these men, bisphosphonate drugs lessen the risk of bone fracture (breaks). The use of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials.

Clinical trials

This section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

  • Cryosurgery is a treatment that uses an instrument to freeze and destroy prostate cancer cells. Ultrasound is used to find the area that will be treated. This type of treatment is also called cryotherapy. Cryosurgery can cause impotence and leakage of urine from the bladder or stool from the rectum.
  • High-intensity focused ultrasound is a treatment that uses ultrasound (high-energy sound waves) to destroy cancer cells. To treat prostate cancer, an endorectal probe is used to make the sound waves.
  • Proton beam radiation therapy is a type of high-energy, external radiation therapy that targets tumors with streams of protons (small, positively charged particles). This type of radiation therapy is being studied in the treatment of prostate cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de próstata es una enfermedad en la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la próstata.

La próstata es una glándula del aparato reproductor masculino que queda justo debajo de la vejiga (el órgano que recoge y desecha la orina) y delante del recto (la parte inferior del intestino). Su tamaño es como el de una nuez y rodea una parte de la uretra (el tubo que conduce la orina al exterior desde la vejiga). La glándula prostática elabora un líquido que es parte del semen.

El cáncer de próstata se encuentra principalmente en hombres de edad avanzada. En los Estados Unidos, aproximadamente 1 de 5 hombres recibirá un diagnóstico de cáncer de próstata.

Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Síntomas

Estos y otros signos y síntomas pueden ser producto del cáncer de próstata o de otras afecciones. Consulte con su médico si presenta cualquiera de los siguientes problemas:

  • Flujo de orina débil o interrumpido ("para y sale").
  • Ganas repentinas de orinar.
  • Aumento de la frecuencia de ir a orinar (en especial, por la noche).
  • Dificultad para iniciar el flujo de orina.
  • Dificultad para vaciar la vejiga por completo.
  • Dolor o ardor al orinar.
  • Presencia de sangre en la orina o el semen.
  • Dolor en la espalda, las caderas o la pelvis que no desaparece.
  • Falta de aire, sensación de mucho cansancio, latidos rápidos del corazón, mareo o piel pálida a causa de anemia.

Hay otras afecciones que pueden producir los mismos síntomas. En la medida en que los hombres envejecen, la próstata se puede volver más grande y obstruir la uretra o la vejiga. Esto puede causar problemas urinarios o sexuales. Esta afección se llama hiperplasia prostática benigna (HPB) y, aunque no es cancerosa, es posible que se necesite cirugía. Los síntomas de la hiperplasia prostática benigna u otros problemas de próstata pueden ser similares a aquellos del cáncer de próstata.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de próstata se utilizan pruebas que examinan la próstata y la sangre. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen digital del recto (EDR): examen del recto. El médico o enfermero inserta un dedo dentro de un guante lubricado en el recto y palpa la próstata a través de la pared del recto en busca de bultos o áreas anormales.
  • Prueba del antígeno prostático específico (APE): prueba de laboratorio que mide las concentraciones del APE en la sangre. El APE es una sustancia elaborada por la próstata que se puede encontrar en una mayor cantidad en la sangre de los hombres que tienen cáncer de próstata. La concentración de APE también puede ser elevada en los hombres que sufren una infección o una inflamación de la próstata, o que tienen HPB (próstata agrandada, pero no cancerosa).
  • Ecografía transrectal: procedimiento en el cual se inserta en el recto una sonda que tiene aproximadamente el tamaño de un dedo para examinar la próstata. La sonda se utiliza para hacer rebotar ondas de sonido de alta energía (ecografía) en los tejidos internos de la próstata y crear ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama ecograma. La ecografía transrectal se puede usar durante una biopsia.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos realizada por un patólogo para observarlos al microscopio. El patólogo observa la muestra de tejido para ver si hay células cancerosas y determinar el puntaje de Gleason. El puntaje de Gleason varía entre 2 y 10, y determina la probabilidad de que el tumor se disemine. Cuanto más bajo es el puntaje, menor la probabilidad de diseminación del tumor.

    Hay dos tipos de biopsia que se usan para diagnosticar el cáncer de próstata:

    • Biopsia transrectal: extracción de tejido de la próstata mediante la introducción de una aguja fina a través del recto hasta la próstata. Este procedimiento se suele realizar mediante ecografía transrectal para ayudar a guiar dónde se toman las muestras de tejido. Un patólogo examina el tejido al microscopio en busca de células cancerosas.
    • Biopsia transperineal: extracción de una muestra de tejido de la próstata mediante la introducción de una aguja fina a través de la piel entre el escroto y el recto hasta la próstata. Con frecuencia, este procedimiento se realiza con una ecografía transrectal para ayudar a guiar por dónde se toman las muestras de tejido. Un patólogo examina el tejido al microscopio en busca de células cancerosas.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Una vez que se ha diagnosticado el cáncer de próstata, se realizan exámenes para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de la próstata o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro de la próstata o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información reunida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio. Es importante conocer el estadio de la enfermedad para planificar el tratamiento. Con frecuencia, los resultados de las pruebas que se usan para el diagnosticar el cáncer de próstata también se usan para estadificar la enfermedad. (Consultar la sección sobre Información general). En el cáncer de próstata, es posible que no se realicen pruebas de estadificación a menos que el paciente presente síntomas o signos de que el cáncer se diseminó, como dolor en los huesos, concentración alta de APE o un puntaje de Gleason alto.

Las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos también se pueden usar en el proceso de estadificación:

  • Exploración ósea: procedimiento para determinar la presencia de células que se dividen rápidamente en los huesos, como las células cancerosas. Se inyecta una pequeña cantidad de material radiactivo en una vena y este se desplaza por el torrente sanguíneo. El material radiactivo se deposita en los huesos y se detecta con un escáner.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento en el que se utiliza un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas del interior del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento en el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Linfadenectomía pélvica: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar los ganglios linfáticos de la pelvis. Un patólogo examina el tejido al microscopio para determinar si hay células cancerosas.
  • Biopsia de las vesículas seminales: extracción de líquido de las vesículas seminales (glándulas que elaboran semen) mediante una aguja. Un patólogo observa el líquido al microscopio para determinar si hay células cancerosas.

El estadio del cáncer se basa en los resultados de la estadificación y los procedimientos de diagnóstico, incluso la prueba del antígeno prostático específico (APE) y el puntaje de Gleason. Las muestras de tejido que se extraen durante la biopsia se usan para calcular el puntaje de Gleason, el cual varía de 2 a 10, y describe la diferencia entre el aspecto de las células normales y de las células cancerosas, así como la probabilidad de que el tumor se disemine. Mientras más bajo es el número, es menos probable que el tumor se disemine.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de próstata se disemina a los huesos, las células cancerosas en los huesos son, en realidad, células de cáncer de próstata. La enfermedad es cáncer de próstata metastásico, no cáncer de hueso.

Se usan los siguientes estadios para el cáncer de próstata:

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se encuentra solo en la próstata. El cáncer:

  • Se encuentra mediante una biopsia con aguja (la cual se realiza debido a una concentración alta de APE) o en una pequeña cantidad de tejido durante una cirugía realizada por otra razón (como por una hiperplasia prostática benigna). La concentración de APE es menor de 10 y el puntaje de Gleason es de 6 o menos, o
  • Se encuentra en la mitad o menos de un lóbulo de la próstata. La concentración de APE es menor de 10 y el puntaje de Gleason es de 6 o menos, o
  • No se puede palpar mediante un examen digital del recto y no se puede observar en las pruebas con imágenes. El cáncer se encuentra en la mitad o menos de un lóbulo de la próstata. No se conocen la concentración de APE y el puntaje de Gleason.

Estadio II

En el estadio II, el cáncer está más avanzado que en el estadio I, pero no se diseminó fuera de la próstata. El estadio II se divide en estadios IIA y IIB.

En el estadio IIA, el cáncer:

  • Se encuentra mediante una biopsia con aguja (la cual se realiza debido a una concentración alta de APE) o en una pequeña cantidad de tejido durante una cirugía realizada por otra razón (como por una hiperplasia prostática benigna). La concentración de APE es menor de 20 y el puntaje de Gleason es de 7, o
  • Se encuentra mediante una biopsia con aguja (la cual se realiza debido a una concentración alta de APE) o en una pequeña cantidad de tejido durante una cirugía realizada por otra razón (como por una hiperplasia prostática benigna). La concentración de APE es de por lo menos 10, pero menor de 20 y el puntaje de Gleason es de 6 o menos, o
  • Se encuentra en la mitad o menos de un lóbulo de la próstata. La concentración de APE es de por lo menos 10, pero menor de 20 y el puntaje de Gleason es de 6 o menos, o
  • Se encuentra en la mitad o menos de un lóbulo de la próstata. La concentración de APE es de menos de 20 y el puntaje de Gleason es de 7, o
  • Se encuentra en más de la mitad de un lóbulo de la próstata.

En el estadio IIB, el cáncer:

  • Se encuentra en lados opuestos de la próstata. La concentración de APE puede ser cualquiera y el puntaje de Gleason puede variar entre 2 y 10, o
  • No se puede palpar durante un examen digital del recto y no se puede ver en las pruebas con imágenes. La concentración de APE es de 20 o más y el puntaje de Gleason puede variar entre 2 y 10, o
  • No se puede palpar durante un examen digital del recto y no se puede observar en las pruebas con imágenes. La concentración de APE puede ser cualquiera y el puntaje de Gleason es de 8 o más.

Estadio III

En el estadio III, el cáncer se diseminó más allá de la capa externa de la próstata y se puede haber diseminado hasta las vesículas seminales. La concentración de APE puede ser cualquiera y el puntaje de Gleason puede variar entre 2 y 10.

Estadio IV

En el estadio IV, la concentración de APE puede ser cualquiera y el puntaje de Gleason puede variar entre 2 y 10. Además, el cáncer:

  • Se diseminó más allá de las vesículas seminales hasta el tejido o los órganos cercanos, como el recto, la vejiga o la pared pélvica, o
  • Se puede haber diseminado hasta las vesículas seminales o hasta el tejido o los órganos cercanos, como el recto, la vejiga o la pared pélvica. El cáncer se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos cercanos, o
  • Se diseminó hasta partes lejanas del cuerpo, que pueden incluir los ganglios linfáticos o los huesos. El cáncer de próstata a menudo se disemina hasta los huesos.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de cáncer de próstata. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente en uso) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se convierte en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan siete tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Espera cautelosa o vigilancia activa
  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Terapia hormonal
  • Quimioterapia
  • Terapia biológica
  • Terapia con bisfosfonatos

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Espera cautelosa o vigilancia activa

La espera cautelosa y la vigilancia activa son tratamientos que se usan para los hombres de edad avanzada que no presentan signos o síntomas u otras afecciones médicas y para aquellos en los que se encuentra cáncer de próstata durante un examen de detección.

La espera cautelosa es la observación cuidadosa de la afección del paciente sin administrar ningún tratamiento hasta que los signos o síntomas se presenten o cambien. Se administra tratamiento para aliviar los síntomas y mejorar la calidad de vida.

La vigilancia activa es el seguimiento atento del estado del paciente sin administrarle tratamiento, a menos que haya cambios en los resultados de las pruebas. Se usa para encontrar signos tempranos de que la afección está empeorando. Cuando se realiza una vigilancia activa, los pacientes se someten regularmente a ciertos exámenes y pruebas, incluso examen digital del recto, prueba del APE, ecografía transrectal y biopsia con aguja transrectal, para determinar si el cáncer está en crecimiento. Cuando el cáncer comienza a crecer, se administra tratamiento para curarlo.

Observación, observación y espera y manejo expectante son otros términos que se usan para describir cuando no se administra tratamiento justo después del diagnóstico.

Cirugía

Es posible que a los pacientes que gocen de buena salud y cuyo tumor está en la glándula prostática solo se les dé tratamiento con cirugía para extirpar el tumor. Se utilizan los siguientes tipos cirugía:

  • Prostatectomía radical: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar la próstata, el tejido circundante y las vesículas seminales. Hay dos tipos de prostatectomía radical:
    • Prostatectomía retropúbica: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar la próstata a través de una incisión (corte) en la pared abdominal. Al mismo tiempo, se pueden extirpar los ganglios linfáticos cercanos.
    • Prostatectomía perineal: procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar la próstata a través de una incisión (corte) practicada en el perineo (área entre el escroto y el ano). Los ganglios linfáticos también se pueden extirpar a través de otra incisión en el abdomen.
  • Linfadenectomía pélvica: cirugía para extirpar los ganglios linfáticos de la pelvis. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Si los ganglios linfáticos tienen cáncer, el médico no extirpará la próstata y podrá recomendar otro tratamiento.
  • Resección transuretral de la próstata (RTUP): procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar tejido de la próstata mediante un resectoscopio (un tubo delgado con iluminación y un instrumento cortante) que se inserta a través de la uretra. Este procedimiento se realiza para tratar la hipertrofia prostática benigna y, a veces, para aliviar los síntomas que causan un tumor antes de administrar otro tratamiento del cáncer. La RTUP también se puede realizar en hombres cuyo tumor está solo en la próstata y a quienes no se les puede practicar una prostatectomía radical.

En algunos casos, se puede realizar una cirugía preservadora del nervio. Este tipo de cirugía puede conservar los nervios que controlan la erección. Sin embargo, es posible que los hombres con tumores grandes o tumores que están muy cerca de los nervios no sean aptos para esta cirugía.

Los siguientes son los posibles problemas después de una cirugía de cáncer de próstata:

  • Impotencia.
  • Pérdida accidental de orina de la vejiga o de materia fecal del recto.
  • Acortamiento del pene (de 1 a 2 centímetros). Se desconoce la razón exacta.
  • Hernia inguinal (abultamiento de grasa o parte del intestino delgado a través de músculos débiles en la ingle). La hernia inguinal se puede presentar más a menudo en hombres tratados con prostatectomía radical que en aquellos con otros tipos de cirugía de la próstata, radioterapia o biopsia de próstata solas. Es más probable que se presente durante los primeros 2 años después de la prostatectomía radical.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento del cáncer en el que se utilizan rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay diferentes tipos de radioterapia:

  • En la radioterapia externa se usa una máquina por fuera del cuerpo para enviar radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia conformal es un tipo de radioterapia externa en la que se usa una computadora para crear una imagen tridimensional (3-D) del tumor. Los haces de radiación se adaptan a la forma del tumor.
  • En la radioterapia interna se usa una sustancia radioactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente en el cáncer o cerca de este. En el cáncer de próstata en estadio temprano, las semillas radiactivas se colocan en la próstata por medio de agujas que se introducen a través de la piel entre el escroto y el recto. La colocación de las semillas radiactivas en la próstata se guía por medio de imágenes de ecografía transrectal o tomografía computarizada (TC). Las agujas se extraen después de colocar las semillas radiactivas en la próstata.
  • En la radioterapia con emisores alfa se usa una sustancia radioactiva para tratar el cáncer de próstata que se diseminó a los huesos. Se inyecta en una vena una sustancia radiactiva llamada radio-223 que se desplaza por el torrente sanguíneo. El radio-223 se acumula en áreas de los huesos con cáncer y elimina las células cancerosas.

La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando. Los hombres que se tratan con radioterapia para el cáncer de próstata tienen un mayor riesgo de cáncer de vejiga o gastrointestinal.

La radioterapia puede producir impotencia y problemas urinarios.

Terapia hormonal

La terapia hormonal es un tratamiento del cáncer que extrae las hormonas o impide su acción y detiene el crecimiento de las células cancerosas. Las hormonas son sustancias elaboradas por las glándulas del cuerpo que circulan en el torrente sanguíneo. En el caso del cáncer de próstata, las hormonas sexuales masculinas pueden hacer crecer el cáncer. Se pueden utilizar medicamentos, cirugía u otras hormonas para reducir la cantidad de hormonas masculinas o impedir que funcionen.

La terapia hormonal para el tratamiento del cáncer de próstata puede incluir las siguientes sustancias:

  • Los agonistas de la hormona liberadora de hormona luteinizante pueden detener la producción de testosterona de los testículos. Algunos ejemplos son la leuprolida, la goserelina y la buserelina.
  • Los antiandrógenos pueden impedir la acción de los andrógenos (hormonas que promueven las características sexuales masculinas), como la testosterona. Por ejemplo, la flutamida, la bicalutamida, la enzalutamida y la nilutamida.
  • Los medicamentos que pueden evitar que las glándulas suprarrenales elaboren andrógenos incluyen el ketoconazol y la aminoglutetimida.
  • La orquiectomía es un procedimiento quirúrgico para extirpar uno o ambos testículos, la principal fuente de hormonas masculinas, como la testosterona, a fin de disminuir la cantidad de hormonas que se elaboran.
  • Los estrógenos (hormonas que promueven las características sexuales femeninas) pueden impedir que los testículos elaboren testosterona. Sin embargo, los estrógenos rara vez se utilizan en el tratamiento del cáncer de próstata debido al riesgo de efectos secundarios graves.

En los hombres tratados con terapia hormonal, se pueden presentar sofocos, deterioro de la función sexual, pérdida del deseo sexual y debilidad en los huesos. Otros efectos secundarios incluyen diarrea, náuseas y picazón.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento de cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, mediante su destrucción o evitando su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra oralmente o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y afectan a células cancerosas en todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La forma en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Terapia biológica

La terapia biológica es un tratamiento en el que se usa el sistema inmunitario del paciente para combatir el cáncer. Se utilizan sustancias elaboradas por el cuerpo o producidas en un laboratorio para impulsar, dirigir o restaurar las defensas naturales del cuerpo contra el cáncer. Esta es un tratamiento que cambia un gen para mejorar la capacidad del cuerpo de combatir la enfermedad. El sipuleucel-T es un tipo de terapia biológica que se usa para tratar el cáncer de próstata que hizo metástasis (se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo).

Terapia con bisfosfonatos

Los bisfosfonatos, como el clodronato o el zoledronato, reducen la enfermedad en los huesos cuando el cáncer se diseminó a estos. Los hombres que se han sometido a tratamiento con antiandrógenos o a orquiectomía tienen un riesgo mayor de pérdida ósea. En estos hombres, los bisfosfonatos disminuyen el riesgo de fractura (rotura) ósea. El uso de bisfosfonatos para prevenir o retrasar la metástasis en los huesos se estudia en ensayos clínicos.

Hay tratamientos para el dolor de huesos causado por la metástasis ósea o la terapia hormonal.

El cáncer de próstata que se disemina a los huesos y algunos tipos de terapia hormonal pueden debilitar los huesos y producir dolor. Los siguientes son los tratamientos para el dolor de hueso:

  • Medicinas para el dolor.
  • Radioterapia externa.
  • Estroncio-89 (un radioisótopo).
  • Terapia dirigida con un anticuerpo monoclonal, como el denosumab.
  • Terapia con bisfosfonatos.
  • Corticosteroides.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Criocirugía es un tratamiento en el que se utiliza un instrumento para congelar y destruir las células cancerosas de la próstata. Se usa la ecografía para encontrar el área que recibirá tratamiento. Este procedimiento también se llama crioterapia. La criocirugía puede producir impotencia y pérdida accidental de orina de la vejiga o de materia fecal del recto.

Ecografía enfocada de alta intensidad es un tratamiento que utiliza ultrasonido (ondas acústicas de alta intensidad) para destruir células cancerosas. Para tratar el cáncer de próstata se utiliza un transductor endorrectal para generar las ondas acústicas.

Radioterapia con haz de protón es un tipo de radioterapia externa de alta energía que dirige hacia los tumores corrientes de protones (partículas pequeñas con carga positiva). Este tipo de radioterapia está en estudio para el tratamiento del cáncer de próstata.

Muchos de los tratamientos estándar actuales se basan en ensayos clínicos anteriores. Los pacientes que participan en un ensayo clínico pueden recibir el tratamiento estándar o estar entre los primeros en recibir el tratamiento nuevo.

Los pacientes que participan en los ensayos clínicos también ayudan a mejorar la forma en que se tratará el cáncer en el futuro. Aunque los ensayos clínicos no conduzcan a tratamientos nuevos eficaces, a menudo responden a preguntas importantes y ayudan a avanzar en la investigación.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Related Documents

Diseases and Conditions
Interactive Tools
Videos
Tests and Procedures
Articles
News
Drug Reference

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

Scott ClarkUrology Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Scott Clark
Phone: 801-587-4381
E-mail: scott.clark@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • The prostate gland tends to grow larger with age, but it may cause urinary changes in men as young as their 30s and 40s.
  • Having prostatitis or an enlarged prostate does not increase your risk of prostate cancer.
  • Some activities can cause a high PSA level, such as riding a bicycle or motorcycle, having an orgasm, or getting a digital rectal exam or prostate biopsy. Men should discuss PSA test results with their doctors.
clc graphic right column