Testicular Cancer

male reproductive systemTesticular cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of one or both testicles.

The testicles are 2 egg-shaped glands located inside the scrotum (a sac of loose skin that lies directly below the penis). The testicles are held within the scrotum by the spermatic cord, which also contains the vas deferens and vessels and nerves of the testicles.

The testicles are the male sex glands and produce testosterone and sperm. Germ cells within the testicles produce immature sperm that travel through a network of tubules (tiny tubes) and larger tubes into the epididymis (a long coiled tube next to the testicles) where the sperm mature and are stored.

Almost all testicular cancers start in the germ cells. The two main types of testicular germ cell tumors are seminomas and nonseminomas. These 2 types grow and spread differently and are treated differently. Nonseminomas tend to grow and spread more quickly than seminomas. Seminomas are more sensitive to radiation. A testicular tumor that contains both seminoma and nonseminoma cells is treated as a nonseminoma.

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men 20 to 35 years old.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases the chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. People who think they may be at risk should discuss this with their doctor. Risk factors for testicular cancer include:

  • Having had an undescended testicle.
  • Having had abnormal development of the testicles.
  • Having a personal history of testicular cancer.
  • Having a family history of testicular cancer (especially in a father or brother).
  • Being white.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

These and other symptoms may be caused by testicular cancer. Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. A doctor should be consulted if any of the following problems occur:

  • A painless lump or swelling in either testicle.
  • A change in how the testicle feels.
  • A dull ache in the lower abdomen or the groin.
  • A sudden build-up of fluid in the scrotum.
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or in the scrotum.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the testicles and blood are used to detect (find) and diagnose testicular cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. The testicles will be examined to check for lumps, swelling, or pain. A history of the patient's health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram.
  • Serum tumor marker test: A procedure in which a sample of blood is examined to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs, tissues, or tumor cells in the body. Certain substances are linked to specific types of cancer when found in increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers. The following tumor markers are used to detect testicular cancer:
    • Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)
    • Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG)
    Tumor marker levels are measured before inguinal orchiectomy and biopsy, to help diagnose testicular cancer.
  • Inguinal orchiectomy: A procedure to remove the entire testicle through an incision in the groin. A tissue sample from the testicle is then viewed under a microscope to check for cancer cells. (The surgeon does not cut through the scrotum into the testicle to remove a sample of tissue for biopsy, because if cancer is present, this procedure could cause it to spread into the scrotum and lymph nodes. It's important to choose a surgeon who has experience with this kind of surgery.) If cancer is found, the cell type (seminoma or nonseminoma) is determined in order to help plan treatment.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After testicular cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the testicles or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the testicles or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment.

The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • Abdominal lymph node dissection: A surgical procedure in which lymph nodes in the abdomen are removed and a sample of tissue is checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. This procedure is also called lymphadenectomy. For patients with nonseminoma, removing the lymph nodes may help stop the spread of disease. Cancer cells in the lymph nodes of seminoma patients can be treated with radiation therapy.
  • Serum tumor marker test: A procedure in which a sample of blood is examined to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs, tissues, or tumor cells in the body. Certain substances are linked to specific types of cancer when found in increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers. The following 3 tumor markers are used in staging testicular cancer:
    • Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)
    • Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG)
    • Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)
    Tumor marker levels are measured again, after inguinal orchiectomy and biopsy, in order to determine the stage of the cancer. This helps to show if all of the cancer has been removed or if more treatment is needed. Tumor marker levels are also measured during follow-up as a way of checking if the cancer has come back.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body:

  • Through tissue. Cancer invades the surrounding normal tissue.
  • Through the lymph system. Cancer invades the lymph system and travels through the lymph vessels to other places in the body.
  • Through the blood. Cancer invades the veins and capillaries and travels through the blood to other places in the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if testicular cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually testicular cancer cells. The disease is metastatic testicular cancer, not lung cancer.

The following stages are used for testicular cancer:

Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)

In stage 0, abnormal cells are found in the tiny tubules where the sperm cells begin to develop. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. All tumor marker levels are normal. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ.

Stage I

In stage I, cancer has formed. Stage I is divided into stage IA, stage IB, and stage IS and is determined after an inguinal orchiectomy is done.

  • In stage IA, cancer is in the testicle and epididymis and may have spread to the inner layer of the membrane surrounding the testicle. All tumor marker levels are normal.
  • In stage IB, cancer:
    • is in the testicle and the epididymis and has spread to the blood vessels or lymph vessels in the testicle; or
    • has spread to the outer layer of the membrane surrounding the testicle; or
    • is in the spermatic cord or the scrotum and may be in the blood vessels or lymph vessels of the testicle.
    All tumor marker levels are normal.
  • In stage IS, cancer is found anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or the scrotum and either:
    • all tumor marker levels are slightly above normal; or
    • one or more tumor marker levels are moderately above normal or high.

Stage II

Stage II is divided into stage IIA, stage IIB, and stage IIC and is determined after an inguinal orchiectomy is done.

  • In stage IIA, cancer:
    • is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and
    • has spread to up to 5 lymph nodes in the abdomen, none larger than 2 centimeters.
    All tumor marker levels are normal or slightly above normal.
  • In stage IIB, cancer is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and either:
    • has spread to up to 5 lymph nodes in the abdomen; at least one of the lymph nodes is larger than 2 centimeters, but none are larger than 5 centimeters; or
    • has spread to more than 5 lymph nodes; the lymph nodes are not larger than 5 centimeters.
    All tumor marker levels are normal or slightly above normal.
  • In stage IIC, cancer:
    • is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and
    • has spread to a lymph node in the abdomen that is larger than 5 centimeters.
    All tumor marker levels are normal or slightly above normal.

Stage III

Stage III is divided into stage IIIA, stage IIIB, and stage IIIC and is determined after an inguinal orchiectomy is done.

  • In stage IIIA, cancer:
    • is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and
    • may have spread to one or more lymph nodes in the abdomen; and
    • has spread to distant lymph nodes or to the lungs.
    Tumor marker levels may range from normal to slightly above normal.
  • In stage IIIB, cancer:
    • is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and
    • may have spread to one or more lymph nodes in the abdomen, to distant lymph nodes, or to the lungs.
    The level of one or more tumor markers is moderately above normal.
  • In stage IIIC, cancer:
    • is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and
    • may have spread to one or more lymph nodes in the abdomen, to distant lymph nodes, or to the lungs.
    The level of one or more tumor markers is high.

    or

    Cancer:

    • is anywhere within the testicle, spermatic cord, or scrotum; and
    • may have spread to one or more lymph nodes in the abdomen; and
    • has not spread to distant lymph nodes or the lung but has spread to other parts of the body.
    Tumor marker levels may range from normal to high.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, testicular cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including urologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the urinary and sex organs in males), surgeons, medical oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with medicine), radiation oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with radiation), nurses, dietitians, and social workers.

Certain treatments for testicular cancer can cause infertility that may be permanent. Patients who may wish to have children should consider sperm banking before having treatment. Sperm banking is the process of freezing sperm and storing it for later use.

Different types of treatments are available for patients with testicular cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Testicular tumors are divided into 3 groups, based on how well the tumors are expected to respond to treatment.

Good Prognosis

For nonseminoma, all of the following must be true:

  • The tumor is found only in the testicle or in the retroperitoneum (area outside or behind the abdominal wall); and
  • The tumor has not spread to organs other than the lungs; and
  • The levels of all the tumor markers are slightly above normal.

For seminoma, all of the following must be true:

  • The tumor has not spread to organs other than the lungs; and
  • The level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is normal. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) may be at any level.

Intermediate Prognosis

For nonseminoma, all of the following must be true:

  • The tumor is found in one testicle only or in the retroperitoneum (area outside or behind the abdominal wall); and
  • The tumor has not spread to organs other than the lungs; and
  • The level of any one of the tumor markers is more than slightly above normal.

For seminoma, all of the following must be true:

  • The tumor has spread to organs other than the lungs; and
  • The level of AFP is normal. β-hCG and LDH may be at any level.

Poor Prognosis

For nonseminoma, at least one of the following must be true:

  • The tumor is in the center of the chest between the lungs; or
  • The tumor has spread to organs other than the lungs; or
  • The level of any one of the tumor markers is high.

There is no poor prognosis grouping for seminoma testicular tumors.

Five types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Surgery to remove the testicle (inguinal orchiectomy) and some of the lymph nodes may be done at diagnosis and staging. Tumors that have spread to other places in the body may be partly or entirely removed by surgery.

Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given chemotherapy or radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after the surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Before surgery, patients should discuss fertility preservation and possible side effects with their doctor.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells. There are two types of radiation therapy. External
radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping the cells from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated. Learn more about this treatment in our Introduction to Chemotherapy video:

 

Surveillance 

Surveillance is closely following a patient's condition without giving any treatment unless there are changes in test results. It is used to find early signs that the cancer has recurred (come back). In surveillance, patients are given certain exams and tests on a regular schedule.

High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant

High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant is a method of giving high doses of chemotherapy and replacing blood-forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood or bone marrow of the patient or a donor and are frozen and stored. After the chemotherapy is completed, the stored stem cells are thawed and given back to the patient through an infusion. These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) the body’s blood cells.

Clinical trials

For some patients, taking part in a clinical trial may be the best treatment choice. Clinical trials are part of the cancer research process. Clinical trials are done to find out if new cancer treatments are safe and effective or better than the standard treatment.

Many of today's standard treatments for cancer are based on earlier clinical trials. Patients who take part in a clinical trial may receive the standard treatment or be among the first to receive a new treatment.

Patients who take part in clinical trials also help improve the way cancer will be treated in the future. Even when clinical trials do not lead to effective new treatments, they often answer important questions and help move research forward. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de testículo es una enfermedad por la cual se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de uno o ambos testículos.

Los testículos son dos glándulas en forma de huevo situadas dentro del escroto (una bolsa de piel suelta que se encuentra suspendida directamente debajo del pene). Los testículos se sostienen dentro del escroto mediante el cordón espermático, que también contiene los vasos deferentes, y los vasos y nervios testiculares.

Los testículos son las glándulas sexuales masculinas y producen testosterona y espermatozoides. Las células germinativas dentro de los testículos producen espermatozoides inmaduros que, a través de una red de túbulos (tubos minúsculos) y tubos más grandes, llegan al epidídimo (un tubo largo en espiral cerca de los testículos), donde los espermatozoides maduran y se almacenan.

Casi todos los cánceres de testículo comienzan en las células germinativas. Los dos tipos principales de tumores de células germinativas testiculares son seminomas y no seminomas. Estos dos tipos crecen y se diseminan de manera diferente y se tratan de distinta manera. Los no seminomas tienden a crecer y diseminarse más rápidamente que los seminomas. Los seminomas son más sensibles a la radiación. Un tumor testicular que contiene tanto células de seminoma como de no seminoma se trata como un no seminoma.

El cáncer de testículo es el cáncer más común en los hombres de 20 a 35 años de edad.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta la posibilidad de presentar una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a padecer de cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que no se va a padecer de cáncer. Las personas que piensan que pueden estar en riesgo deben discutir este tema con su médico. Los factores de riesgo para el cáncer de testículo incluyen los siguientes aspectos:

  • Un testículo no descendido.
  • Desarrollo anormal de los testículos.
  • Antecedentes personales de cáncer de testículo.
  • Antecedentes familiares de cáncer de testículo (especialmente del padre o un hermano).
  • Ser de raza blanca.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Estos y otros síntomas pueden ser causados por el cáncer de testículo. Otras afecciones pueden causar los mismos síntomas. Se debe consultar con un médico si se presenta alguno de los siguientes problemas:

  • Protuberancia indolora o inflamación en cualquiera de los testículos.
  • Cambio en los testículos al tacto.
  • Dolor sordo en el abdomen inferior o en la ingle.
  • Acumulación súbita de líquido en el escroto.
  • Dolor o incomodidad en un testículo o en el escroto.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de testículo, se utilizan pruebas que examinan los testículos y la sangre. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para verificar signos generales de salud, incluido el examen de signos de enfermedad, como protuberancias o todo lo que tenga aspecto inusual. Se examina la presencia de protuberancias, inflamación o dolor en los testículos. También se anotan los antecedentes de hábitos de salud, y las enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores del paciente.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento para el cual se hacen rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasonido) en los tejidos u órganos internos para producir ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama ecograma.
  • Prueba sérica de marcadores tumorales: procedimiento en el que se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias liberadas en la sangre por órganos, tejidos o células tumorales del cuerpo. Ciertas sustancias se relacionan con tipos específicos de cáncer cuando se encuentran en concentraciones altas en la sangre. Estas se llaman marcadores tumorales. Para detectar un cáncer de testículo se utilizan los marcadores tumorales siguientes:
    • Alfafetoproteína (αFP).
    • Gonadotropina coriónica humana beta (GCH-ß).
    Los índices de marcadores tumorales se miden antes de la orquiectomía inguinal y la biopsia, para ayudar a diagnosticar el cáncer de testículo.
  • Orquiectomía inguinal: procedimiento para extirpar todo el testículo a través de una incisión en la ingle. Después, se observa una muestra de tejido del testículo bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. (El cirujano no corta el escroto hacia el testículo para extraer una muestra de tejido en el momento de realizar una biopsia porque, si hay un cáncer, este procedimiento podría hacer que el cáncer se disemine hasta el escroto y los ganglios linfáticos. Es importante elegir a un cirujano con experiencia en esta clase de cirugía). Si se encuentra cáncer, se determina el tipo de célula (seminoma o no seminoma) para ayudar a planificar el tratamiento.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de que se diagnostica el cáncer de testículo, se realizan pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de los testículos o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el cáncer se ha diseminado dentro de los testículos o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida a partir del proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante contar con esta información a fin de planear el mejor tratamiento.

En el proceso de estadificación, se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y los huesos del tórax. Un x-ray es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película, con lo cual se crean imágenes de áreas internas del cuerpo.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento por el que se crea una serie de imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo, tomadas desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar un tinte en una vena o ingerirse a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Exploración por TEP (tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para identificar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. se inyecta en la vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radioactiva. En la exploración por TEP el explorador rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma fotos de las partes del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Los tumores malignos aparecen más brillantes en la foto porque estos son más activos y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • IRM (imaginología por resonancia magnética): procedimiento que usa un imán, ondas de radio, y una computadora para producir una serie de fotos detalladas de áreas dentro del cuerpo. Este procedimiento se llama también imaginología por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Disección de ganglios linfáticos abdominales: procedimiento quirúrgico mediante el que se extraen ganglios linfáticos del abdomen y se examina una muestra de tejido bajo un microscopio para determinar si hay signos de cáncer. Este procedimiento también se llama linfadenectomía. En el caso de los pacientes de no seminoma, la extirpación de los ganglios linfáticos puede ayudar a interrumpir la diseminación de la enfermedad. Las células cancerosas en los ganglios linfáticos de los pacientes de seminoma se pueden tratar con radioterapia.
  • Prueba sérica de marcadores tumorales: procedimiento para el cual se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias liberadas en la sangre por los órganos, los tejidos o las células de un tumor del cuerpo. Ciertas sustancias se relacionan con tipos específicos de cáncer cuando se encuentran en concentraciones altas en la sangre. Estas se llaman marcadores tumorales. Los tres marcadores tumorales que se emplean para estadificar el cáncer de testículo son los siguientes:
    • Alfafetoproteína (AFP).
    • Gonadotropina coriónica humana beta (GCH-ß).
    • Lactato-deshidrogenasa (LDH).
    Los índices de marcadores tumorales se miden otra vez después de la orquiectomía inguinal y la biopsia para determinar el estadio del cáncer. Esto ayuda a mostrar si se extirpó todo el cáncer o si se necesita tratamiento adicional. Los índices de marcadores tumorales se miden también durante el seguimiento para verificar si el cáncer ha vuelto.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

Se usan los siguientes estadios para el cáncer de testículo:

Estadio 0 (carcinoma in situ)

En el estadio 0, se encuentran células anormales en los túbulos minúsculos donde comienzan a desarrollarse las células de los espermatozoides. Estas células anormales se pueden volver cancerosas y diseminarse hasta el tejido cercano normal. Todos los índices de marcadores tumorales son normales. El estadio 0 también se llama carcinoma in situ.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer ya se formó. El estadio I se divide en estadio IA, estadio IB y estadio IS, que se determinan después de realizar una orquiectomía inguinal.

  • En el estadio IA, el cáncer está en el testículo y en el epidídimo, y se puede haber diseminado hasta la capa interior de la membrana que rodea el testículo. Todos los índices de marcadores tumorales son normales.
  • En el estadio IB, el cáncer:
    • Está en el testículo y el epidídimo y se diseminó hasta los vasos sanguíneos o los vasos linfáticos del testículo; o
    • Se diseminó hasta la capa externa de la membrana que rodea el testículo; o
    • Está en el cordón espermático o en el escroto, y puede estar en los vasos sanguíneos o los vasos linfáticos del testículo.
    Todos los índices de marcadores tumorales son normales.
  • En el estadio IS, el cáncer se encuentra en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto y:
    • Todos los índices de marcadores tumorales están levemente más altos que lo normal; o
    • Uno o más índices de los marcadores tumorales son moderadamente más altos que lo normal o son altos.

Estadio II

El estadio II se divide en estadio IIA, estadio IIB y estadio IIC, que se determinan después de realizar una orquiectomía inguinal.

  • En el estadio IIA, el cáncer:
    • Está en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto; y
    • Se diseminó hasta cinco ganglios linfáticos del abdomen y ninguno mide más de dos centímetros.
    Todos los índices de los marcadores tumorales son normales o levemente más altos que lo normal.
  • En el estadio IIB, el cáncer se encuentra en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto y:
    • Se diseminó hasta cinco ganglios linfáticos del abdomen; por lo menos uno de los ganglios linfáticos mide más de dos centímetros, pero ninguno más de cinco centímetros; o
    • Se diseminó hasta más de cinco ganglios linfáticos; los ganglios linfáticos no miden más de cinco centímetros.
    Todos los índices de los marcadores tumorales son normales o levemente más altos que lo normal.
  • En el estadio IIC, el cáncer:
    • El cáncer se encuentra en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto; y
    • Se diseminó hasta un ganglio linfático del abdomen que mide más de cinco centímetros.
    Todos los índices de los marcadores tumorales son normales o levemente más altos que lo normal.
Estadio III

El estadio III se divide en estadio IIIA, estadio IIIB y estadio IIIC, que se determinan después de realizar una orquiectomía inguinal.

  • En el estadio IIIA, el cáncer:
    • Se encuentra en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto; y
    • Se puede haber diseminado hasta uno o más ganglios linfáticos del abdomen; y
    • Se diseminó hasta ganglios linfáticos distantes o hasta los pulmones.
    Los índices de los marcadores tumorales pueden oscilar entre normal a levemente más alto que lo normal.
  • En el estadio IIIB, el cáncer:
    • Se encuentra en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto; y
    • Se puede haber diseminado hasta uno o más ganglios linfáticos del abdomen, hasta ganglios linfáticos distantes o hasta los pulmones.
    El índice de uno o más marcadores tumorales está moderadamente por encima de lo normal.
  • En el estadio IIIC, el cáncer:
    • Se encuentra en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto; y
    • Se puede haber diseminado hasta uno o más ganglios linfáticos del abdomen, hasta ganglios linfáticos distantes o hasta los pulmones.
    El índice de uno o más marcadores tumorales es alto.

    o

    El cáncer:

    • Está en cualquier lugar dentro del testículo, el cordón espermático o el escroto; y
    • Se puede haber diseminado hasta uno o más ganglios linfáticos del abdomen; y
    • No se diseminó hasta ganglios linfáticos distantes o el pulmón, pero se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo.
    Los índices de los marcadores tumorales pueden variar de normal a alto.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Ciertos tratamientos para el cáncer de testículo pueden producir esterilidad permanente. Los pacientes que desean tener niños deben considerar el almacenamiento de esperma antes de someterse a tratamiento. El almacenamiento de esperma es el proceso mediante el cual se congelan los espermatozoides y se almacenan para su uso en el futuro.

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de cáncer de testículo. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente en uso) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Los tumores de testículo se dividen en tres grupos, según el grado previsto de respuesta al tratamiento.

Pronóstico favorable

Para el no seminoma, debe ocurrir todo lo indicado a continuación:

  • El tumor se encuentra solo en el testículo o el retroperitoneo (área afuera o detrás de la pared abdominal); y
  • El tumor no se diseminó hasta otros órganos además de los pulmones; y
  • Los índices de marcadores tumorales son levemente superiores a lo normal.

Para el seminoma, debe ocurrir todo lo indicado a continuación:

  • El tumor no se diseminó hasta otros órganos además de los pulmones; y
  • La concentración de alfafetoproteína (AFP) es normal. La gonadotropina coriónica humana beta (GCH-ß) y el lactato-deshidrogenasa (LDH) se pueden encontrar en cualquier concentración.

Pronóstico intermedio

Para el no seminoma, debe ocurrir todo lo indicado a continuación:

  • El tumor se encuentra solo en un testículo o en el retroperitoneo (área afuera o detrás de la pared abdominal); y
  • El tumor no se diseminó hasta otros órganos además de los pulmones; y
  • El índice de cualquiera de los marcadores tumorales es más que levemente superior a lo normal.

Para el seminoma, debe ocurrir todo lo indicado a continuación:

  • El tumor se diseminó hasta otros órganos además de los pulmones; y
  • La concentración de AFP es normal. La GCH-ß y la LDH pueden tener cualquier concentración.

Pronóstico precario

Para el no seminoma, debe ocurrir al menos una de las posibilidades mencionadas a continuación:

  • El tumor está en el centro del pecho, entre los pulmones; o
  • El tumor se diseminó hasta otros órganos además de los pulmones; o
  • El índice de cualquiera de los marcadores tumorales es alto.

No hay una agrupación para el pronóstico de los tumores tipo seminoma de testículo.

Se usan cinco tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia
  • Vigilancia
  • Quimioterapia de dosis altas con trasplante de células madre

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

Se puede realizar una cirugía con el propósito de extirpar el testículo (orquiectomía inguinal radical) y algunos de los ganglios linfáticos en el momento del diagnóstico y la estadificación. Los tumores que se diseminaron hasta otros lugares del cuerpo se pueden extirpar parcial o totalmente mediante cirugía.

Incluso si el médico extirpa todo el cáncer que se puede observar en el momento de la cirugía, es posible que se administre quimioterapia o radioterapia a algunos pacientes después de la cirugía para destruir toda célula cancerosa que haya quedado. El tratamiento administrado después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que utiliza rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina afuera del cuerpo para enviar la radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna utiliza una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, cables o catéteres que se colocan directamente en el cáncer o cerca del mismo. La forma de administración de la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento para el cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para interrumpir el crecimiento de células cancerosas, mediante su destrucción o evitando su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se administra oralmente o se inyecta en una vena o músculo, los medicamentos ingresan en el torrente sanguíneo y pueden llegar a células cancerosas en todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, un órgano o una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La forma de administración de la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que está siendo tratado.

Vigilancia

La vigilancia consiste en el seguimiento minucioso de la afección de un paciente sin administrar tratamiento, a menos que se presenten cambios en los resultados de las pruebas. Se usa para encontrar signos tempranos de recidiva (regreso) del cáncer. En la vigilancia, los pacientes se someten regularmente a ciertas pruebas y exámenes.

Quimioterapia de dosis altas con trasplante de células madre

La quimioterapia de dosis alta con trasplante de células madre es una forma de administrar dosis altas de quimioterapia y reemplazar las células generadoras de sangre que fueron destruidas por el tratamiento del cáncer. Las células madre (células sanguíneas inmaduras) se extraen de la sangre o la médula ósea del paciente mismo o de un donante, se congelan y almacenan. Después de finalizar la quimioterapia, las células madre guardadas se descongelan y se reinyectan en el paciente mediante una infusión. Estas células madre reinyectadas se convierten en células sanguíneas restaurando los glóbulos rojos del cuerpo.

Ensayos clínicos

Muchos de los tratamientos estándar actuales se basan en ensayos clínicos anteriores. Los pacientes que participan en un ensayo clínico pueden recibir el tratamiento estándar o estar entre los primeros en recibir el tratamiento nuevo.

Los pacientes que participan en los ensayos clínicos también ayudan a mejorar la forma en que se tratará el cáncer en el futuro. Aunque los ensayos clínicos no conduzcan a tratamientos nuevos eficaces, a menudo responden a preguntas importantes y ayudan a avanzar en la investigación.

Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

HCI Resources

Make An Appointment

Scott ClarkUrology Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Scott Clark
Phone: 801-587-4381
E-mail: scott.clark@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men 20 to 35 years old.
  • Testicular cancer can usually be cured.
  • The risk for testicular cancer is greater in men whose brother or father has had the disease.
clc graphic right column