Thyroid Cancer

thyroidThyroid cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the thyroid gland.

The thyroid is a gland at the base of the throat near the trachea (windpipe). It is shaped like a butterfly, with a right lobe and a left lobe. The isthmus, a thin piece of tissue, connects the two lobes. A healthy thyroid is a little larger than a quarter. It usually cannot be felt through the skin.

The thyroid uses iodine, a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, to help make several hormones. Thyroid hormones do the following:

  • Control heart rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy (metabolism).
  • Control the amount of calcium in the blood.

There are four main types of thyroid cancer:

  • Papillary thyroid cancer: The most common type of thyroid cancer.
  • Follicular thyroid cancer. Hürthle cell carcinoma is a form of follicular thyroid cancer and is treated the same way.
  • Medullary thyroid cancer.
  • Anaplastic thyroid cancer.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Treatment
Support 

 

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn’t mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for thyroid cancer include the following:

  • Being between 25 and 65 years old.
  • Being female.
  • Being exposed to radiation to the head and neck as a child or being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb. The cancer may occur as soon as 5 years after exposure.
  • Having a history of goiter (enlarged thyroid).
  • Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer.
  • Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A syndrome, and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B syndrome.
  • Being Asian.

Medullary thyroid cancer is sometimes caused by a change in a gene that is passed from parent to child. The genes in cells carry hereditary information from parent to child. A certain change in a gene that is passed from parent to child (inherited) may cause medullary thyroid cancer. A test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient is tested first to see if he or she has the changed gene. If the patient has it, other family members may also be tested. Family members, including young children, who have the changed gene can decrease the chance of developing medullary thyroid cancer by having a thyroidectomy (surgery to remove the thyroid).

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Thyroid cancer may not cause early symptoms. It is sometimes found during a routine physical exam. Symptoms may occur as the tumor gets bigger. Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • A lump in the neck.
  • Trouble breathing.
  • Trouble swallowing.
  • Hoarseness.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the thyroid, neck, and blood are used to detect (find) and diagnose thyroid cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or swelling in the neck, voice box, and lymph nodes, and anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Laryngoscopy: A procedure in which the doctor checks the larynx (voice box) with a mirror or with a laryngoscope. A laryngoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. A thyroid tumor may press on vocal cords. The laryngoscopy is done to see if the vocal cords are moving normally.
  • Blood hormone studies: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain hormones released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. An unusual (higher or lower than normal) amount of a substance can be a sign of disease in the organ or tissue that makes it. The blood may be checked for abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH is made by the pituitary gland in the brain. It stimulates the release of thyroid hormone and controls how fast follicular thyroid cells grow. The blood may also be checked for high levels of the hormone calcitonin and antithyroid antibodies.
  • Blood chemistry studies: A procedure in which a blood sample is checked to measure the amounts of certain substances, such as calcium, released into the blood by organs and tissues in the body. An unusual (higher or lower than normal) amount of a substance can be a sign of disease in the organ or tissue that makes it.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. The picture can be printed to be looked at later. This procedure can show the size of a thyroid tumor and whether it is solid or a fluid-filled cyst. Ultrasound may be used to guide a fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid: The removal of thyroid tissue using a thin needle. The needle is inserted through the skin into the thyroid. Several tissue samples are removed from different parts of the thyroid. A pathologist views the tissue samples under a microscope to look for cancer cells. Because the type of thyroid cancer can be hard to diagnose, patients should ask to have biopsy samples checked by a pathologist who has experience diagnosing thyroid cancer.
  • Surgical biopsy: The removal of the thyroid nodule or one lobe of the thyroid during surgery so the cells and tissues can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. Because the type of thyroid cancer can be hard to diagnose, patients should ask to have biopsy samples checked by a pathologist who has experience diagnosing thyroid cancer.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

 After thyroid cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the thyroid or to other parts of the body.

The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the thyroid or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Ultrasound exam: A procedure in which high-energy sound waves (ultrasound) are bounced off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. The echoes form a picture of body tissues called a sonogram. The picture can be printed to be looked at later.
  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy: The removal of the sentinel lymph node during surgery. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a tumor. It is the first lymph node the cancer is likely to spread to from the tumor. A radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through the lymph ducts to the lymph nodes. The first lymph node to receive the substance or dye is removed. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to look for cancer cells. If cancer cells are not found, it may not be necessary to remove more lymph nodes.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body: 

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if thyroid cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually thyroid cancer cells. The disease is metastatic thyroid cancer, not lung cancer.

To learn the stages of the different types of thyroid cancer, view the National Cancer Institute Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®).

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, thyroid cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including otolaryngologists (doctors who specialize in diseases of the head and neck), endocrinologists (doctors who specialize in hormone-related problems), surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, social workers, dietitians, and other professionals.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with thyroid cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Five types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Surgery is the most common treatment of thyroid cancer. One of the following procedures may be used:

  • Lobectomy: Removal of the lobe in which thyroid cancer is found. Biopsies of lymph nodes in the area may be done to see if they contain cancer.
  • Near-total thyroidectomy: Removal of all but a very small part of the thyroid.
  • Total thyroidectomy: Removal of the whole thyroid.
  • Lymphadenectomy: Removal of lymph nodes in the neck that contain cancer.

Radiation therapy, including radioactive iodine

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Radiation therapy may be given after surgery to kill any thyroid cancer cells that were not removed. Follicular and papillary thyroid cancers are sometimes treated with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. RAI is taken by mouth and collects in any remaining thyroid tissue, including thyroid cancer cells that have spread to other places in the body. Since only thyroid tissue takes up iodine, the RAI destroys thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer cells without harming other tissue. Before a full treatment dose of RAI is given, a small test-dose is given to see if the tumor takes up the iodine.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.. Learn more about this treatment in our Introduction to Chemotherapy video:

 

Thyroid hormone treatment

Hormone therapy is a cancer treatment that removes hormones or blocks their action and stops cancer cells from growing. Hormones are substances made by glands in the body and circulated in the bloodstream. In the treatment of thyroid cancer, drugs may be given to prevent the body from making thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone that can increase the chance that thyroid cancer will grow or recur.

Also, because thyroid cancer treatment kills thyroid cells, the thyroid is not able to make enough thyroid hormone. Patients are given thyroid hormone replacement pills.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells without harming normal cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is a type of targeted therapy that blocks signals needed for tumors to grow. Vandetanib is a TKI used to treat thyroid cancer.

Clinical trials

For some patients, taking part in a clinical trial may be the best treatment choice. Clinical trials are part of the cancer research process. Clinical trials are done to find out if new cancer treatments are safe and effective or better than the standard treatment.

Many of today's standard treatments for cancer are based on earlier clinical trials. Patients who take part in a clinical trial may receive the standard treatment or be among the first to receive a new treatment.

Patients who take part in clinical trials also help improve the way cancer will be treated in the future. Even when clinical trials do not lead to effective new treatments, they often answer important questions and help move research forward. For more information, visit HCI's clinical trials website.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de tiroides es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la glándula tiroidea.

La tiroides es una glándula en la base de la garganta, cerca de la tráquea. Tiene forma de mariposa, con un lóbulo derecho y un lóbulo izquierdo. El istmo, un trozo delgado de tejido, conecta los dos lóbulos. Una tiroides saludable es un poco más grande que una moneda de un cuarto de dólar. Por lo general, no se puede palpar a través de la piel.

La tiroides usa yodo, un mineral que se encuentra en algunos alimentos y en la sal yodada, para ayudarla a elaborar varias hormonas. Las hormonas tiroideas cumplen las siguientes funciones:

  • Controlan la frecuencia cardíaca, la temperatura corporal y la rapidez con la que los alimentos se transforma en energía (metabolismo).
  • Controlan la cantidad de calcio en la sangre.

Hay cuatro tipos principales de cáncer de tiroides:

  • Cáncer de tiroides papilar: el tipo más común de cáncer de tiroides.
  • Cáncer de tiroides folicular. El carcinoma de células de Hürthle es una forma de cáncer de tiroides folicular y se trata de la misma manera.
  • Cáncer de tiroides medular.
  • Cáncer de tiroides anaplásico.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta el riesgo de contraer una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que se va a contraer cáncer; no tener un factor de riesgo no significa que no se va a contraer cáncer. Consulte con su médico si piensa que puede estar en riesgo. Entre los factores de riesgo de cáncer de tiroides se incluyen los siguientes:

  • Tener entre 25 y 65 años.
  • Ser mujer.
  • Haber estado expuesto a radiación en la cabeza y el cuello en la niñez o haber estado expuesto a la radiación de una bomba atómica. El cáncer se puede presentar a partir de los 5 años después de la exposición.
  • Tener antecedentes de bocio (agrandamiento de la tiroides).
  • Tener antecedentes familiares de enfermedad tiroidea o cáncer de tiroides.
  • Tener de ciertas afecciones genéticas, como carcinoma de tiroides medular familiar (CTMF), síndrome de neoplasia endocrina múltiple tipo 2A y síndrome de neoplasia endocrina múltiple tipo 2B.
  • Ser de raza asiática.

El cáncer de tiroides medular a veces está causado por un cambio en un gen que pasó de padres a hijos.

Los genes en las células contienen información hereditaria que pasa de padres a hijos. Cierto cambio en un gen que pasa de padres a hijos (heredado) puede causar cáncer de tiroides medular. Se formuló una prueba que puede encontrar el gen cambiado antes de que se presente el cáncer de tiroides medular. El paciente se somete a la prueba para determinar si tiene el gen cambiado. Si el paciente lo tiene, también se puede someter a otros miembros de la familia a esta prueba. Los familiares, incluso los niños pequeños, que tienen el gen cambiado pueden disminuir la probabilidad de enfermar de cáncer de tiroides medular si se someten a una tiroidectomía (cirugía para extirpar la tiroides).

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

El cáncer de tiroides puede no causar síntomas tempranos. A veces se encuentra durante un examen físico de rutina. Los síntomas se pueden presentar cuando el tumor aumenta de tamaño. Otras afecciones pueden causar los mismos síntomas. Consulte con su médico si tiene cualquiera de los siguientes problemas:

  • Una masa en el cuello.
  • Dificultad para respirar.
  • Dificultad para tragar.
  • Ronquera.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de tiroides, se utilizan pruebas para examinar la tiroides, el cuello y la sangre. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para verificar los signos generales de salud, incluso los signos de enfermedad, como masas o hinchazón del cuello, la laringe y los ganglios linfáticos, y cualquier otra cosa que no parezca habitual. También se anotan los antecedentes de los hábitos de salud, y las enfermedades y tratamientos anteriores del paciente.
  • Laringoscopia: procedimiento mediante el cual el médico examina la laringe con un espejo o un laringoscopio Un laringoscopio es un instrumento con forma de tubo delgado con una luz y una lente para observar. Un tumor de tiroides puede apretar las cuerdas vocales. La laringoscopia se realiza para determinar si las cuerdas vocales se mueven normalmente.
  • Estudios de las hormonas en la sangre: procedimiento en el que se observa una muestra de sangre para medir la cantidad de ciertas hormonas que los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo liberan a la sangre. Una cantidad anormal (más alta o más baja que la normal) de una sustancia puede ser un signo de enfermedad en el órgano o tejido que la elabora. Se debe verificar si la sangre contiene concentraciones anormales de hormona estimulante de la tiroides (HET). La hipófisis en el cerebro elabora la HET, que estimula la liberación de la hormona tiroidea y controla la rapidez con que crecen las células foliculares de la tiroides. También se puede verificar si la sangre contiene concentraciones altas de la hormona calcitonina y anticuerpos antitiroideos.
  • Estudios de la química de la sangre: procedimiento mediante el que se examina una muestra de sangre para medir las cantidades de ciertas sustancias, como el calcio, liberadas a la sangre por los órganos y tejidos del cuerpo. Una cantidad anormal (mayor o menor que lo normal) de una sustancia puede ser signo de enfermedad en el órgano o el tejido que la elabora.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento por el cual se hacen rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasónicas) en tejidos u órganos internos y se crean ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama sonograma. La imagen se puede imprimir para observarla más tarde. Este procedimiento puede mostrar el tamaño de un tumor de la tiroides y si este es sólido o un quiste lleno de líquido. Se puede usar la ecografía para guiar una biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Biopsia por aspiración con aguja fina de la tiroides: extracción de tejido de la tiroides mediante una aguja fina. La aguja se inserta a través de la piel hasta la tiroides. Se extraen varias muestras de tejido de diferentes partes de la tiroides. Un patólogo observa las muestras de tejido al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Debido a que puede ser difícil diagnosticar el tipo de cáncer de tiroides, los pacientes deben solicitar que un patólogo con experiencia en el diagnóstico del cáncer de tiroides examine las muestras de biopsia.
  • Biopsia quirúrgica: extracción del nódulo de la tiroides o de un lóbulo de la tiroides durante una cirugía para que un patólogo pueda observar las células y tejidos al microscopio, y verificar si hay signos de cáncer. Debido a que puede ser difícil diagnosticar el tipo de cáncer de tiroides, los pacientes deben solicitar que un patólogo con experiencia en el diagnóstico del cáncer de tiroides examine las muestras de biopsia.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después del diagnóstico de cáncer de tiroides, se hacen pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de la tiroides o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso utilizado para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro de la tiroides o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante saber en qué estadio se encuentra la enfermedad para poder planificar su tratamiento. Se pueden utilizar las siguientes pruebas en el proceso de estadificación:

  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo, desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se inyecta un tinte en una vena o se ingiere, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computarizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • Ecografía: procedimiento por el cual se hacen rebotar ondas sonoras de alta energía (ultrasónicas) en tejidos u órganos internos y se crean ecos. Los ecos forman una imagen de los tejidos corporales que se llama sonograma. La imagen se puede imprimir y estudiar más tarde.
  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y huesos del interior del tórax. Un rayo X es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película que muestra una imagen de áreas del interior del cuerpo.
  • Biopsia de ganglio linfático centinela: extracción del ganglio linfático centinela durante una cirugía. El ganglio linfático centinela es el primer ganglio que recibe el drenaje linfático de un tumor y es el primer ganglio linfático donde es posible que el cáncer se disemine desde el tumor. Se inyecta una sustancia radiactiva o un tinte azul cerca del tumor. La sustancia o el tinte fluye a través de los conductos linfáticos hasta los ganglios linfáticos. Se extrae el primer ganglio que recibe la sustancia o el tinte. Un patólogo observa el tejido al microscopio para verificar si hay células cancerosas. Cuando no se detectan células cancerosas, puede no ser necesario extraer más ganglios linfáticos.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras. El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. Cuando el cáncer se disemina a otra parte del cuerpo, se llama metástasis. Las células cancerosas se desprenden de donde se originaron (tumor primario) y se desplazan a través del sistema linfático o la sangre.

  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer penetra el sistema linfático, se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer penetra la sangre, se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos, y forma un tumor (tumor metastásico) en otra parte del cuerpo.

El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de tiroides se disemina hasta el pulmón, las células cancerosas en el pulmón son, en realidad, células de cáncer de tiroides. La enfermedad es cáncer de tiroides metastásico, no cáncer de pulmón.

Para clasificar el cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular en pacientes de menos de 45 años, se utilizan los siguientes estadios:

Estadio I

En el estadio I del cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular, el tumor es de cualquier tamaño, puede estar en la tiroides o haberse diseminado hasta los tejidos cercanos y los ganglios linfáticos. El cáncer no se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

Estadio II

En el estadio II del cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular, el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó desde la tiroides hasta otras partes del cuerpo como, por ejemplo, los pulmones o el hueso, y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.

Para clasificar el cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular en pacientes de 45 años o más, se utilizan los siguientes estadios:

Estadio I

En el estadio I del cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular, el cáncer se encuentra solo en la tiroides y el tumor mide 2 centímetros o menos.

Estadio II

En el estadio II del cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular, el cáncer está solo en la tiroides y el tumor mide más de 2 centímetros, pero no más de 4 centímetros.

Estadio III

En el estadio III del cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular, se presenta una de las siguientes:

  • el tumor mide más de 4 centímetros y está solo en la tiroides, o el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó solo hasta los tejidos exteriores de la tiroides, pero no hasta los ganglios linfáticos; o
  • el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se pudo haber diseminado solo hasta los tejidos exteriores de la tiroides y se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos cerca de la tráquea o de la laringe (cuerdas vocales).

Estadio IV

El estadio IV del cáncer de tiroides papilar y folicular se subdivide en los estadios IVA, IVB y IVC.

  • En el estadio IVA, se presenta una de las siguientes:
    • el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó afuera de la tiroides hasta los tejidos debajo de la piel, la tráquea, el esófago, la laringe (cuerdas vocales) o el nervio laríngeo recurrente (un nervio con dos ramas que llega hasta la laringe); el cáncer se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos cercanos; o
    • el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se pudo haber diseminado solo hasta los tejidos exteriores de la tiroides. El cáncer se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos de uno o ambos lados del cuello, o entre los pulmones.
  • En el estadio IVB, el cáncer se diseminó hasta el tejido frente a la columna vertebral o rodeó la arteria carótida o los vasos sanguíneos del área entre los pulmones; el cáncer se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.
  • En el estadio IVC, el tumor es de cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo como, por ejemplo, los pulmones y los huesos y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.

Para clasificar el cáncer de tiroides medular se utilizan los siguientes estadios:

Estadio 0

El cáncer de tiroides medular en estadio 0, solo se encuentra con una prueba de detección especial. No se puede encontrar un tumor en la tiroides.

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer de tiroides medular se encuentra solo en la tiroides y mide 2 centímetros o menos.

Estadio II

En el estadio II del cáncer de tiroides medular, se encuentra alguna de las siguientes:

  • El tumor mide más de 2 centímetros y está solo en la tiroides; o
  • el tumor es de cualquier tamaño y se diseminó hasta los tejidos justo afuera de la tiroides, pero no hasta los ganglios linfáticos.

Estadio III

En el estadio III del cáncer de tiroides medular, el tumor es de cualquier tamaño, se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos cerca de la tráquea y la laringe (cuerdas vocales), y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los tejidos justo afuera de la tiroides.

Estadio IV

El estadio VI, el cáncer de tiroides medular se subdivide en los estadios IVA, IVB y IVC.

  • En el estadio IVA, se encuentra una de las siguientes:
    • el tumor es de cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó afuera de la tiroides hasta los tejidos debajo de la piel, la tráquea, el esófago, la laringe (cuerdas vocales) o el nervio laríngeo recurrente (un nervio con dos ramas que va hasta la laringe); el cáncer se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos cerca de la tráquea o la laringe; o
    • el tumor es de cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se pudo haber diseminado solo hasta los tejidos fuera de la tiroides. El cáncer se diseminó hasta los ganglios linfáticos de uno o ambos lados del cuello, o hasta el área entre los pulmones.
  • En el estadio IVB, el cáncer se ha diseminó hasta el tejido del frente de la columna espinal o rodeó la arteria carótida o los vasos sanguíneos del área entre los pulmones. El cáncer se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.
  • En el estadio IVC, el tumor tiene cualquier tamaño y el cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo como, por ejemplo, los pulmones y los huesos, y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.

El cáncer de tiroides anaplásico se considera cáncer de tiroides en estadio IV.

El cáncer de tiroides anaplásico crece rápido y habitualmente se disemina hasta adentro del cuello, donde se lo encuentra. El estadio IV del cáncer de tiroides anaplásico se subdivide en los estadios IVA, IVB y IVC.

  • En el estadio IVA, el cáncer se encuentra en la tiroides y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.
  • En el estadio IVB, el cáncer se diseminó hasta el tejido justo afuera de la tiroides y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.
  • En el estadio IVC, el cáncer se diseminó hasta otras partes del cuerpo como, por ejemplo, los pulmones y los huesos, y se pudo haber diseminado hasta los ganglios linfáticos.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para los pacientes de cáncer de tiroides. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un nuevo tratamiento es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan cinco tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia, incluso tratamiento con yodo radiactivo
  • Quimioterapia
  • Terapia hormonal tiroidea
  • Terapia dirigida

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La cirugía es el tratamiento más común para el cáncer de tiroides. Se puede usar uno de los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Lobectomía: cirugía para extirpar el lóbulo de la tiroides donde se encuentra el cáncer. Se puede realizar biopsias de los ganglios linfáticos del área para verificar si contienen cáncer.
  • Tiroidectomía casi total: extirpación de toda la tiroides, excepto una pequeña parte.
  • Tiroidectomía total: extirpación de toda la tiroides.
  • Linfadenectomía: extirpación de los ganglios linfáticos del cuello que contienen cáncer.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer que utiliza rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa utiliza una máquina fuera del cuerpo para enviar radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna usa una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente dentro del cáncer o cerca de él. La manera en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo de cáncer el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Se puede administrar radioterapia después de la cirugía para destruir cualquier célula cancerosa de la tiroides que no se extirpó. El cáncer de tiroides folicular y el cáncer de tiroides papilar a veces se tratan con yodo radiactivo (YRA). El YRA se toma por la boca y se acumula en cualquier tejido tiroideo restante, incluso en las células del cáncer de tiroides que se hayan diseminado hasta otras partes del cuerpo. Debido a que solo el tejido tiroideo absorbe el yodo, el YRA destruye el tejido tiroideo y el tejido tiroideo canceroso sin dañar otros tejidos. Antes de administrar una dosis completa de tratamiento con YRA, se administra una pequeña dosis de prueba para determinar si el tumor absorbe el yodo.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer que utiliza medicamentos para detener el crecimiento de células cancerosas, ya sea destruyéndolas o impidiendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por vía oral o se inyecta en una vena o en un músculo, los medicamentos entran al torrente sanguíneo y pueden alcanzar las células cancerosas en todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, en un órgano o en una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La manera en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Terapia hormonal tiroidea

La terapia con hormonas es un tratamiento para el cáncer que extirpa o bloquea la acción de las hormonas y detiene el crecimiento de las células cancerosas. Las hormonas son sustancias elaboradas por las glándulas del cuerpo y que circulan por el torrente sanguíneo. En el caso del tratamiento del cáncer de tiroides, se pueden administrar medicamentos para evitar que el cuerpo elabore la hormona estimulante de la tiroides (HET), que es una hormona que puede aumentar la probabilidad de que el cáncer de tiroides crezca o recidive.

Además, como el tratamiento del cáncer de tiroides destruye las células tiroideas, la tiroides no puede elaborar suficiente hormona tiroidea. Se administra a los pacientes pastillas de reemplazo de la hormona tiroidea.

Terapia dirigida

La terapia dirigida es un tipo de tratamiento para el que se usan medicamentos u otras sustancias para identificar y atacar células cancerosas específicas sin dañar las células normales. La terapia con un inhibidor de la tirosina cinasa (ITC) es un tipo de terapia dirigida que bloquea las señales que los tumores necesitan para crecer. El vandetanib es un tipo de ITC que se usa para tratar el cáncer de tiroides.

Ensayos clínicos

Muchos de los tratamientos estándar actuales se basan en ensayos clínicos anteriores. Los pacientes que participan en un ensayo clínico pueden recibir el tratamiento estándar o estar entre los primeros en recibir el tratamiento nuevo.

Los pacientes que participan en los ensayos clínicos también ayudan a mejorar la forma en que se tratará el cáncer en el futuro. Aunque los ensayos clínicos no conduzcan a tratamientos nuevos eficaces, a menudo responden a preguntas importantes y ayudan a avanzar en la investigación.

 Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

HCI Resources

 

Make An Appointment

keri carter head and neck cancer program

Head and Neck Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Keri Carter
Phone: 801-585-0193
E-mail: keri.carter@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • Thyroid cancer accounts for about 1.6% of all cancers diagnosed in the United States.
  • In the United States, women are almost three times more likely than men to develop thyroid cancer.
  • Scientists are studying iodine as a possible risk factor for thyroid cancer. Too little iodine in the diet may increase the risk of follicular thyroid cancer; however, other studies show that too much iodine in the diet may increase the risk of papillary thyroid cancer. More studies are needed to know whether iodine is a risk factor.
clc graphic right column