Vaginal Cancer

female reproductive systemVaginal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the vagina.

The vagina is the canal leading from the cervix (the opening of uterus) to the outside of the body. At birth, a baby passes out of the body through the vagina (also called the birth canal).

Vaginal cancer is not common. There are two main types of vaginal cancer:

  • Squamous cell carcinoma: Cancer that forms in squamous cells, the thin, flat cells lining the vagina. Squamous cell vaginal cancer spreads slowly and usually stays near the vagina, but may spread to the lungs, liver, or bone. This is the most common type of vaginal cancer.
  • Adenocarcinoma: Cancer that begins in glandular (secretory) cells. Glandular cells in the lining of the vagina make and release fluids such as mucus. Adenocarcinoma is more likely than squamous cell cancer to spread to the lungs and lymph nodes. A rare type of adenocarcinoma is linked to being exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES) before birth. Adenocarcinomas that are not linked with being exposed to DES are most common in women after menopause.

Risk Factors
Symptoms
Screening and Diagnosis
Staging
Treatment
Support

ctt line break

Risk Factors

Anything that increases your risk of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. Talk with your doctor if you think you may be at risk. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include the following:

  • Being aged 60 or older.
  • Being exposed to DES while in the mother's womb. In the 1950s, the drug DES was given to some pregnant women to prevent miscarriage (premature birth of a fetus that cannot survive). Women who were exposed to DES before birth have an increased risk of vaginal cancer. Some of these women develop a rare form of vaginal cancer called clear cell adenocarcinoma.
  • Having human papilloma virus (HPV) infection.
  • Having a history of abnormal cells in the cervix or cervical cancer.
  • Having a history of abnormal cells in the uterus or cancer of the uterus.
  • Having had a hysterectomy for health problems that affect the uterus.

Top

ctt line break

Symptoms

Vaginal cancer often does not cause early symptoms and may be found during a routine pelvic exam and Pap test. When symptoms occur, they may be caused by vaginal cancer or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • Bleeding or discharge not related to menstrual periods.
  • Pain during sexual intercourse.
  • Pain in the pelvic area.
  • A lump in the vagina.
  • Pain when urinating.
  • Constipation.

Top

ctt line break

Screening and Diagnosis

Tests that examine the vagina and other organs in the pelvis are used to detect (find) and diagnose vaginal cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used:

  • Physical exam and history: An exam of the body to check general signs of health, including checking for signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual. A history of the patient’s health habits and past illnesses and treatments will also be taken.
  • Pelvic exam: An exam of the vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and rectum. The doctor or nurse inserts one or two lubricated, gloved fingers of one hand into the vagina and places the other hand over the lower abdomen to feel the size, shape, and position of the uterus and ovaries. A speculum is also inserted into the vagina and the doctor or nurse looks at the vagina and cervix for signs of disease. A Pap test or Pap smear of the cervix is usually done. The doctor or nurse also inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the rectum to feel for lumps or abnormal areas.
  • Pap test: A procedure to collect cells from the surface of the cervix and vagina. A piece of cotton, a brush, or a small wooden stick is used to gently scrape cells from the cervix and vagina. The cells are viewed under a microscope to find out if they are abnormal. This procedure is also called a Pap smear.
  • Colposcopy: A procedure in which a colposcope (a lighted, magnifying instrument) is used to check the vagina and cervix for abnormal areas. Tissue samples may be taken using a curette (spoon-shaped instrument) and checked under a microscope for signs of disease.
  • Biopsy: The removal of cells or tissues from the vagina and cervix so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. If a Pap test shows abnormal cells in the vagina, a biopsy may be done during a colposcopy.

Top

ctt line break

Staging

After vaginal cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the vagina or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the vagina or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following procedures may be used in the staging process:

  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • CT scan (CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging): A procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI).
  • PET scan (positron emission tomography scan): A procedure to find malignant tumor cells in the body. A small amount of radioactive glucose (sugar) is injected into a vein. The PET scanner rotates around the body and makes a picture of where glucose is being used in the body. Malignant tumor cells show up brighter in the picture because they are more active and take up more glucose than normal cells do.
  • Cystoscopy: A procedure to look inside the bladder and urethra to check for abnormal areas. A cystoscope is inserted through the urethra into the bladder. A cystoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue samples, which are checked under a microscope for signs of cancer.
  • Ureteroscopy: A procedure to look inside the ureters to check for abnormal areas. A ureteroscope is inserted through the bladder and into the ureters. A ureteroscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease. A ureteroscopy and cystoscopy may be done during the same procedure.
  • Proctoscopy: A procedure to look inside the rectum to check for abnormal areas. A proctoscope is inserted through the rectum. A proctoscope is a thin, tube-like instrument with a light and a lens for viewing. It may also have a tool to remove tissue to be checked under a microscope for signs of disease.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy may be done to find out if cancer has spread to the cervix. A sample of tissue is removed from the cervix and viewed under a microscope. A biopsy that removes only a small amount of tissue is usually done in the doctor’s office. A cone biopsy (removal of a larger, cone-shaped piece of tissue from the cervix and cervical canal) is usually done in the hospital. A biopsy of the vulva may also be done to see if cancer has spread there.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body:

  • Tissue. The cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. The cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.

Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. The cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if vaginal cancer spreads to the lung, the cancer cells in the lung are actually vaginal cancer cells. The disease is metastatic vaginal cancer, not lung cancer.

In vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN), abnormal cells are found in tissue lining the inside of the vagina. These abnormal cells are not cancer. VAIN is grouped based on how deep the abnormal cells are in the tissue lining the vagina:

  • VAIN 1: Abnormal cells are found in the outermost one third of the tissue lining the vagina.
  • VAIN 2: Abnormal cells are found in the outermost two-thirds of the tissue lining the vagina.
  • VAIN 3: Abnormal cells are found in more than two-thirds of the tissue lining the vagina. When abnormal cells are found throughout the tissue lining, it is called carcinoma in situ.

VAIN may become cancer and spread into the vaginal wall. VAIN is sometimes called stage 0.

The following stages are used for vaginal cancer:

Stage I

In stage I, cancer is found in the vaginal wall only.

Stage II

In stage II, cancer has spread through the wall of the vagina to the tissue around the vagina. Cancer has not spread to the wall of the pelvis.

Stage III

In stage III, cancer has spread to the wall of the pelvis.

Stage IV

Stage IV is divided into stage IVA and stage IVB:

  • Stage IVA: Cancer may have spread to one or more of the following areas:
    • The lining of the bladder.
    • The lining of the rectum.
    • Beyond the area of the pelvis that has the bladder, uterus, ovaries, and cervix.
  • Stage IVB: Cancer has spread to parts of the body that are not near the vagina, such as the lung or bone.

Top

ctt line break

Treatment

At Huntsman Cancer Institute, vaginal cancer is treated by a team of specialists, including gynecologic oncologists (doctors who specialize in cancers of the female reproductive system), surgeons, medical oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with medicine), radiation oncologists (doctors who treat cancer with radiation), nurses, dietitians, and social workers.

Different types of treatments are available for patients with vaginal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Three types of standard treatment are used:

New treatments are being tested in clinical trials.

Surgery

Surgery is the most common treatment of vaginal cancer. The following surgical procedures may be used:

  • Laser surgery: A surgical procedure that uses a laser beam (a narrow beam of intense light) as a knife to make bloodless cuts in tissue or to remove a surface lesion such as a tumor.
  • Wide local excision: A surgical procedure that takes out the cancer and some of the healthy tissue around it.
  • Vaginectomy: Surgery to remove all or part of the vagina.
  • Total hysterectomy: Surgery to remove the uterus, including the cervix. If the uterus and cervix are taken out through the vagina, the operation is called a vaginal hysterectomy. If the uterus and cervix are taken out through a large incision (cut) in the abdomen, the operation is called a total abdominal hysterectomy. If the uterus and cervix are taken out through a small incision in the abdomen using a laparoscope, the operation is called a total laparoscopic hysterectomy.
  • Lymph node dissection: A surgical procedure in which lymph nodes are removed and a sample of tissue is checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. This procedure is also called lymphadenectomy. If the cancer is in the upper vagina, the pelvic lymph nodes may be removed. If the cancer is in the lower vagina, lymph nodes in the groin may be removed.
  • Pelvic exenteration: Surgery to remove the lower colon, rectum, bladder, cervix, vagina, and ovaries. Nearby lymph nodes are also removed. Artificial openings (stoma) are made for urine and stool to flow from the body into a collection bag.

Skin grafting may follow surgery, to repair or reconstruct the vagina. Skin grafting is a surgical procedure in which skin is moved from one part of the body to another. A piece of healthy skin is taken from a part of the body that is usually hidden, such as the buttock or thigh, and used to repair or rebuild the area treated with surgery.

Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the surgery, some patients may be given radiation therapy after surgery to kill any cancer cells that are left. Treatment given after the surgery, to lower the risk that the cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the cancer. Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer. The way the radiation therapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can affect cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The way the chemotherapy is given depends on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.

Topical chemotherapy for squamous cell vaginal cancer may be applied to the vagina in a cream or lotion. Learn more about this treatment in our Introduction to Chemotherapy video:

 

Clinical trials

This section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. Learn more about clinical trials at HCI.

  • Radiosensitizers are drugs that make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Combining radiation therapy with radiosensitizers may kill more tumor cells.

Top

ctt line break

Support

When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer, concerns about treatments and managing side effects, hospital stays, and medical bills are common. You may also worry about caring for your family, employment, or how to continue normal daily activities.

Here's where you can go for support:

  • Your health care team can answer your questions and talk to you about your concerns. They can help you with any side effects and keep you informed of all your treatments, test results, and future doctor visits.
  • The G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center has hundreds of free brochures and more than 3,000 books, DVDs, and CDs available for checkout. You can browse the library, perform Internet research, or talk with a cancer information specialist.
  • Our Patient and Family Support Services professionals offer HCI patients and their families emotional support and resources for coping with cancer and its impact on daily life.
  • The Linda B. and Robert B. Wiggins Wellness-Survivorship Center offers support groups, classes, and activities aimed to increase the quality of life and well-being of HCI patients and their families.

Top

ctt line break

Adapted from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries
This information last updated on HCI website September 2014

El cáncer de vagina es una enfermedad por la que se forman células malignas (cancerosas) en los tejidos de la vagina.

La vagina es el conducto que conecta el cuello uterino (la abertura del útero) con el exterior del cuerpo. Durante el nacimiento, el bebé sale del cuerpo a través de la vagina (que también se llama canal del parto).

El cáncer de vagina no es frecuente. Hay dos tipos principales de cáncer de vagina:

  • Carcinoma de células escamosas: cáncer que se forma en las células escamosas, las células planas y delgadas que revisten la vagina. El cáncer de células escamosas de la vagina se disemina lentamente y suele quedarse cerca de la vagina, pero se puede diseminar hasta los pulmones, el hígado o los huesos. Es el tipo de cáncer de vagina más común.
  • Adenocarcinoma: cáncer que comienza en las células glandulares (secretoras). Las células glandulares en el revestimiento de la vagina producen y liberan líquidos tales como el moco. El adenocarcinoma tiene mayor probabilidad de diseminarse hasta los pulmones y los ganglios linfáticos que el cáncer de células escamosas. Un tipo poco común de adenocarcinoma se relaciona con la exposición al dietilstilbestrol (DES) antes de nacer. Los adenocarcinomas que no se relacionan con la exposición al DES son más comunes en las mujeres después de la menopausia.

Factores de Riesgo
Síntomas
Detección y Diagnóstico
Estadificación
Tratamiento
Apoyo

ctt line break

Factores de Riesgo

Cualquier cosa que aumenta el riesgo de contraer una enfermedad se llama factor de riesgo. Tener un factor de riesgo no significa que usted va tener cáncer; no tener factores de riesgo no significa que usted no va a tener cáncer. Consulte con su médico si piensa que puede tener riesgo. Entre los factores de riesgo del cáncer de vagina se incluyen los siguientes:

  • Tener 60 años o más.
  • Haber estado expuesto al DES cuando estaba en el útero materno. En la década de 1950, se administró el medicamento DES a algunas mujeres embarazadas para evitar aborto espontáneo (nacimiento prematuro de un feto que no puede sobrevivir). Las mujeres expuestas al DES antes del nacimiento tienen mayor riesgo de cáncer de vagina. Algunas de estas mujeres presentan un tipo poco frecuente de este cáncer que se llama adenocarcinoma de células claras.
  • Padecer de la infección por el papilomavirus humano (PVH).
  • Tener antecedentes de células anormales en el cuello uterino o de cáncer de cuello uterino.
  • Tener antecedentes de células anormales en el útero o cáncer de útero.
  • Haber tenido una histerectomía por problemas de salud que afectan el útero.

Top

ctt line break

Síntomas

Con frecuencia, el cáncer de vagina no causa síntomas tempranos y se puede encontrar durante un examen pélvico y una prueba de Pap de rutina. Cuando se presentan síntomas, estos pueden obedecer al cáncer de vagina u otras afecciones. Consultar con el médico si tiene alguno de los problemas siguientes:

  • Sangrado o secreción no relacionados con la menstruación.
  • Dolor durante las relaciones sexuales.
  • Dolor en el área de la pelvis.
  • Un bulto en la vagina.
  • Dolor al orinar.
  • Estreñimiento.

Top

ctt line break

Detección y Diagnóstico

Para detectar (encontrar) y diagnosticar el cáncer de vagina, se utilizan pruebas que examinan la vagina y otros órganos de la pelvis. Se puede usar las siguientes pruebas y procedimientos:

  • Examen físico y antecedentes: examen del cuerpo para verificar si existen signos generales de salud, incluso el control de signos de enfermedad, como tumores o neoplasias. Se toma el historial médico del paciente, así como de sus hábitos de salud y enfermedades anteriores.
  • Examen pélvico: examen de la vagina, el cuello uterino, el útero, las trompas de Falopio, los ovarios y recto. El médico o enfermero introducen uno o dos dedos cubiertos con guantes lubricados en la vagina y coloca la otra mano sobre la parte baja del abdomen para palpar el tamaño, la forma y la posición del útero y los ovarios. También introducen un espéculo en la vagina, y observan la vagina y el cuello uterino para detectar cualquier signo de enfermedad. Generalmente se lleva a cabo una prueba o frotis de Papanicolaou. El médico o enfermero también introducen un dedo cubierto con un guante lubricado en el recto para detectar la presencia de bultos o áreas anormales.
  • Prueba de Pap: procedimiento para obtener células de la superficie del cuello uterino y la vagina. Se usa un copo de algodón, un cepillo o una paleta de madera para raspar suavemente las células del cuello uterino y la vagina. Las células se observan bajo un microscopio para determinar si son anormales. Este procedimiento también se llama prueba de Pap.
  • Colposcopia: procedimiento para el que se usa un colposcopio (un instrumento con aumento y luz) para observar el interior de la vagina y el cuello uterino y verificar si hay áreas anormales. Se pueden extraer muestras de tejido con una cureta (una herramienta con forma de cuchara) para observarlas bajo un microscopio y verificar si hay signos de enfermedad.
  • Biopsia: extracción de células o tejidos con el fin de que un patólogo los observe bajo microscopio y determine si hay signos de cáncer. Si la prueba de Pap muestra células anormales en la vagina, se puede realizar una biopsia durante una colposcopia.

Top

ctt line break

Estadificación

Después de diagnosticarse el cáncer de vagina, se hacen pruebas para determinar si las células cancerosas se diseminaron dentro de la vagina o hasta otras partes del cuerpo.

El proceso usado para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó dentro de la vagina o hasta otras partes del cuerpo se llama estadificación. La información obtenida en el proceso de estadificación determina el estadio de la enfermedad. Es importante saber en qué estadio se encuentra la enfermedad para poder planificar su tratamiento. En el proceso de estadificación, se pueden utilizar los siguientes procedimientos:

  • Radiografía del tórax: radiografía de los órganos y los huesos dentro del tórax. Una radiografía es un tipo de haz de energía que puede atravesar el cuerpo y plasmarse en una película, con lo cual se crean imágenes del interior del cuerpo.
  • Exploración por TC (exploración por TAC): procedimiento mediante el cual se toma una serie de imágenes detalladas del interior del cuerpo desde ángulos diferentes. Las imágenes son creadas por una computadora conectada a una máquina de rayos X. Se puede inyectar un tinte en una vena o ingerirse, a fin de que los órganos o los tejidos se destaquen más claramente. Este procedimiento también se llama tomografía computada, tomografía computadorizada o tomografía axial computarizada.
  • IRM (imágenes por resonancia magnética): procedimiento para el que se usa un imán, ondas de radio y una computadora para crear imágenes detalladas de áreas internas del cuerpo. Este procedimiento también se llama imágenes por resonancia magnética nuclear (IRMN).
  • Exploración con TEP (exploración con tomografía por emisión de positrones): procedimiento para encontrar células de tumores malignos en el cuerpo. Se inyecta en una vena una cantidad pequeña de glucosa (azúcar) radiactiva. El escáner de TEP rota alrededor del cuerpo y toma una imagen de los lugares del cuerpo que absorben la glucosa. Las células de tumores malignos tienen aspecto más brillante en la imagen porque son más activas y absorben más glucosa que las células normales.
  • Cistoscopía: procedimiento para observar el interior de la vejiga y la uretra y verificar si hay áreas anormales. Se introduce un cistoscopio a través de la uretra hasta la vejiga. Un cistoscopio es un instrumento delgado en forma de tubo con una luz y una lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer muestras de tejido que se estudian bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de cáncer.
  • Ureteroscopía: procedimiento para observar el interior de los uréteres para verificar si hay áreas anormales. Se introduce un ureteroscopio a través de la vagina hasta los uréteres. Un ureteroscopio es un instrumento delgado en forma de tubo con una luz y una lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer tejido y observarlo bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de enfermedad. Se pueden realizar una cistoscopia y una uteroscopía durante el mismo procedimiento.
  • Proctoscopía: procedimiento para observar el interior del recto para determinar si hay áreas anormales. Se inserta un proctoscopio a través del recto. Un proctoscopio es un instrumento delgado en forma de tubo, con una luz y una lente para observar. También puede tener una herramienta para extraer tejido que se estudia bajo un microscopio para verificar si hay signos de enfermedad.
  • Biopsia: se puede realizar una biopsia para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó hasta el cuello uterino. Se extrae una muestra de tejido del cuello uterino y se observa bajo un microscopio. La biopsia en la que se extrae solamente una pequeña cantidad de tejido suele realizarse en el consultorio médico. A menudo, se realiza una biopsia de cono (extracción de una pieza de tejido más grande en forma de cono del cuello uterino y del canal cervical) en el hospital. También se puede hacer una biopsia de la vulva para determinar si el cáncer se diseminó hasta ella.

El cáncer se disemina en el cuerpo de tres maneras:

  • A través del tejido. El cáncer invade el tejido normal que lo rodea.
  • A través del sistema linfático. El cáncer invade el sistema linfático y circula por los vasos linfáticos hacia otros lugares del cuerpo.
  • A través de la sangre. El cáncer invade las venas y los capilares, y circula por la sangre hasta otros lugares del cuerpo.

Cuando las células cancerosas se separan del tumor primario (original) y circulan a través de la linfa o la sangre hasta otros lugares del cuerpo, se puede formar otro tumor (secundario). Este proceso se llama metástasis. El tumor secundario (metastásico) es el mismo tipo de cáncer que el tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de mama se disemina hasta los huesos, las células cancerosas de los huesos son en realidad células de cáncer de mama. La enfermedad es cáncer metastásico de mama, no cáncer de hueso.

El cáncer se puede diseminar a través del tejido, el sistema linfático y la sangre:

  • Tejido. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y se extiende hacia las áreas cercanas.
  • Sistema linfático. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó hasta entrar en el sistema linfático. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos linfáticos a otras partes del cuerpo.
  • Sangre. El cáncer se disemina desde donde comenzó y entra en la sangre. El cáncer se desplaza a través de los vasos sanguíneos a otras partes del cuerpo.

El cáncer se puede diseminar desde donde comenzó a otras partes del cuerpo. El tumor metastásico es el mismo tipo de cáncer del tumor primario. Por ejemplo, si el cáncer de vagina se disemina a los pulmones, las células cancerosas de los pulmones son en realidad células cancerosas de la vagina. La enfermedad es cáncer metastásico de la vagina, no cáncer de pulmón. 

En la neoplasia intraepitelial vaginal (VAIN), se encuentran células anormales en el tejido que reviste el interior de la vagina.

Estas células anormales no son cancerosas. La neoplasia epitelial vaginal (VAIN) se agrupa de acuerdo con qué tan profundas estén las células anormales en el tejido que reviste la vagina:

  • VAIN 1: se encuentran células anormales en el tercio más externo del tejido que reviste la vagina.
  • VAIN 2: se encuentran células anormales en los dos tercios más externos del tejido que reviste la vagina.
  • VAIN 3: Se encuentran células anormales en más de dos tercios del tejido que reviste la vagina. Cuando estas células se encuentran a través del revestimiento del tejido, esto se llama carcinoma in situ.

La VAIN se puede volver cancerosa y diseminar a la pared de la vagina y algunas veces se considera estadio 0

Para clasificar el cáncer de vagina se usan los siguientes estadios:

Estadio I

En el estadio I, el cáncer se formó y se encuentra solo en la pared de la vagina.

Estadio II

En el estadio II, el cáncer se diseminó a través de la pared de la vagina hacia el tejido que la rodea. El cáncer no se diseminó hasta la pared de la pelvis.

Estadio III

En el estadio III, el cáncer se diseminó hasta la pared de la pelvis.

Estadio IV

El estadio IV se divide en estadio IVA y estadio IVB:

  • Estadio IVA: el cáncer se pudo diseminar hasta una o más de las áreas siguientes:
    • El revestimiento de la vejiga.
    • El revestimiento del recto.
    • Más allá del área de la pelvis que comprende a la vejiga, el útero, los ovarios y el cuello uterino.
  • Estadio IVB: el cáncer se ha diseminó hasta partes del cuerpo que no están cerca de la vagina, como los pulmones o los huesos.

Top

ctt line break

Tratamiento

Hay diferentes tipos de tratamiento disponibles para las pacientes con cáncer de vagina. Algunos tratamientos son estándar (el tratamiento actualmente usado) y otros se encuentran en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Un ensayo clínico de un tratamiento es un estudio de investigación que procura mejorar los tratamientos actuales u obtener información sobre tratamientos nuevos para pacientes de cáncer. Cuando los ensayos clínicos muestran que un tratamiento nuevo es mejor que el tratamiento estándar, el tratamiento nuevo se puede convertir en el tratamiento estándar. Los pacientes deberían pensar en participar en un ensayo clínico. Algunos ensayos clínicos están abiertos solo para pacientes que no han comenzado un tratamiento.

Se usan tres tipos de tratamiento estándar:

  • Cirugía
  • Radioterapia
  • Quimioterapia

Se están probando nuevos tipos de tratamiento en ensayos clínicos.

Cirugía

La cirugía es el tratamiento más común para el cáncer de vagina. Se pueden usar los siguientes procedimientos de cirugía:

  • Cirugía láser: procedimiento quirúrgico para el que se usa un haz de rayo láser (haz estrecho de intensa luz) como si fuera un cuchillo para hacer cortes sin sangrado en el tejido o para extirpar una lesión superficial como un tumor.
  • Escisión local amplia: procedimiento quirúrgico que se usa para extirpar el cáncer y parte del tejido sano que lo rodea.
  • Vaginectomía: cirugía para extirpar toda la vagina o parte de ella.
  • Histerectomía total: cirugía para extirpar el útero, incluso el cuello uterino. Si el útero y el cuello uterino se extraen a través de la vagina, la operación se llama histerectomía vaginal. Si el útero y el cuello uterino se extraen mediante una incisión (corte) grande en el abdomen, la operación se llama histerectomía abdominal total. Si el útero y el cuello uterino se extraen a través de una pequeña incisión en el abdomen usando un laparoscopio, la operación se llama histerectomía laparoscópica total.
  • Disección de ganglios linfáticos: procedimiento quirúrgico mediante el cual se extraen ganglios linfáticos y se examina una muestra de tejido bajo un microscopio para determinar si hay signos de cáncer. Este procedimiento también se llama linfadenectomía. Si el cáncer está en la región superior de la vagina, es posible que se extirpen los ganglios linfáticos pélvicos. Si el cáncer está en la parte inferior de la vagina, se pueden extirpar los ganglios linfáticos de la ingle.
  • Exenteración pélvica: cirugía para extirpar la parte inferior del colon, el recto, la vejiga el cuello uterino, la vagina y los ovarios. También se extirpan los ganglios linfáticos cercanos. Se hacen aberturas artificiales (estomas) para que la orina y la materia fecal puedan fluir del cuerpo hacia una bolsa de drenaje.

Se puede realizar un injerto de piel después de la cirugía para reparar o reconstruir la vagina. El injerto de piel es un procedimiento quirúrgico mediante el cual se traslada piel de una parte del cuerpo a otra. Se toma un pedazo de piel sana de una parte del cuerpo que suele estar escondida, como la nalga o el muslo, y se usa para reparar o reconstruir el área tratada con cirugía.

Incluso cuando el médico extirpa todo el cáncer que se observa al momento de la cirugía, se puede administrar radioterapia a algunas pacientes después de la cirugía para eliminar toda célula cancerosa que haya quedado. El tratamiento administrado después de la cirugía para disminuir el riesgo de que el cáncer vuelva se llama terapia adyuvante.

Radioterapia

La radioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer que usa rayos X de alta energía u otros tipos de radiación para destruir las células cancerosas o impedir que crezcan. Hay dos tipos de radioterapia. La radioterapia externa usa una máquina fuera del cuerpo para enviar radiación hacia el cáncer. La radioterapia interna usa una sustancia radiactiva sellada en agujas, semillas, alambres o catéteres que se colocan directamente dentro del cáncer o cerca de él. La manera en que se administra la radioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Quimioterapia

La quimioterapia es un tratamiento contra el cáncer que usa medicamentos para detener el crecimiento de células cancerosas, ya sea destruyéndolas o deteniendo su multiplicación. Cuando la quimioterapia se toma por vía oral o se inyecta en una vena o en un músculo, los medicamentos entran al torrente sanguíneo y pueden alcanzar las células cancerosas en todo el cuerpo (quimioterapia sistémica). Cuando la quimioterapia se coloca directamente en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, en un órgano o en una cavidad corporal como el abdomen, los medicamentos afectan principalmente las células cancerosas de esas áreas (quimioterapia regional). La manera en que se administra la quimioterapia depende del tipo y el estadio del cáncer que se está tratando.

Ensayos clínicos

En este sección se hace referencia a tratamientos en evaluación en ensayos clínicos. Para mayor información sobre ensayos clínicos, consultar nuestra página web sobre ensayos clínicos.

Los radiosensibilizadores son medicamentos que aumentan la sensibilidad de las células tumorales a la radiación. La combinación de radioterapia y radiosensibilizadores puede destruir más células tumorales.

Muchos de los tratamientos estándar actuales se basan en ensayos clínicos anteriores. Los pacientes que participan en un ensayo clínico pueden recibir el tratamiento estándar o estar entre los primeros en recibir el tratamiento nuevo. Los pacientes que participan en los ensayos clínicos también ayudan a mejorar la forma en que se tratará el cáncer en el futuro. Aunque los ensayos clínicos no conduzcan a tratamientos nuevos eficaces, a menudo responden a preguntas importantes y ayudan a avanzar en la investigación.

Top

ctt line break

Apoyo

El Centro de Información del Cáncer es su lugar adecuado para obtener información gratuita sobre el cáncer. Estamos ubicados en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman.

El Centro de Información del Cáncer ofrece tres formas de obtener información sobre el cáncer:

  • Llame sin costo a 1-888-424-2100 – oprima “2” para Español
  • Visite nuestra biblioteca en el sexto piso del Hospital del Cáncer Huntsman
  • Envíe un correo electrónico a cancerinfo@hci.utah.edu

Vea estos recursos adicionales:

Top

ctt line break

Adaptado del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer PDQ® base de datos integral

*If you are interested in a trial that is currently marked *Not Open, please contact the Patient Education team at 1-888-424-2100 or patient.education@hci.utah.edu for other trial options. Enrollment is updated daily.

Forte Research Systems in partnership with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Anna C. Beck, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 587-4241
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4246

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Medical Oncology, Pain Medicine & Palliative Care

Adam L. Cohen, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 213-4269
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 585-0260

Specialties: Brain Tumors, Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Neuro-Oncology, Oncology, Spinal Cord Tumors

Mark K. Dodson, M.D.

Locations
OB-Gyn Avenues Clinic (801) 587-2809

Specialties: Gynecologic Oncology, Oncology Surgery

David K. Gaffney, M.D., Ph.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Lymphomas, Radiation Oncology

C. Matthew Peterson, M.D.

Locations
Centerville Health Center (801) 581-3834
Parkway Health Center (801) 581-3834
South Jordan Health Center (801) 581-3834
University Hospital (801) 581-3834
Utah Center for Reproductive Medicine (801) 581-3834

Specialties: Adolescent Gynecology, Endometriosis, Gynecological Surgery, Gynecology, In Vitro Fertilization, Minimally Invasive Pelvic Surgery, Pediatric Gynecology, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility, Tubal Ligation Reversal, Women's Genetic Counseling

Matthew M. Poppe, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 581-2396

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Pediatric Radiation Therapy, Radiation Oncology, Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Susan M. Rose, M.D.

Locations
Madsen Health Center (801) 213-2995

Specialties: Adolescent Gynecology, Colposcopy, Endometrial Ablation, Gynecological Surgery, Gynecology, Menopause, OB/Gyn, General, Obstetrics, Pediatric Gynecology

Howard T. Sharp, M.D.

Locations
Madsen Health Center (801) 213-2995
University Hospital (801) 213-2995

Specialties: Colposcopy, Endometrial Ablation, Gynecological Surgery, Gynecology, Menopause, OB/Gyn, General, Obstetrics, Pelvic Pain, Robotic Surgery, Women's Health

Elise J. Simons, M.D.

Specialties: Gynecologic Oncology

Andrew P. Soisson, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Institute (801) 213-2239

Specialties: Gynecologic Oncology, Oncology Surgery

Paul R. Summers, M.D.

Locations
Madsen Health Center (801) 213-2995
University Hospital (801) 213-2995

Specialties: Abnormal Pap Smear, Colposcopy, Gynecological Surgery, Gynecology, Infections in Women, Infectious Diseases, OB/Gyn, General, Obstetrics, Recurrent Yeast Infection, Venereal Diseases, Vulvar Disease and Irritation, Women's Health

Jennifer J. Trauscht-Van Horn, M.D.

Locations
Madsen Health Center (801) 213-2995
University Hospital (801) 213-2995

Specialties: Colposcopy, Contraception and Family Planning, Gynecological Surgery, Infectious Diseases, OB/Gyn, General, Obstetrics, Women's Health

Theresa L. Werner, M.D.

Locations
Huntsman Cancer Hospital (801) 585-0250

Specialties: Breast Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Medical Oncology, Oncology

HCI Resources

 

Make An Appointment

keri patterson make an appointment

Gynecology Cancer Program
Care coordinator: Sarai Rivera
Phone: 801-587-4399
E-mail: sarai.rivera@hci.utah.edu

Did You Know?

  • When found in early stages, vaginal cancer can often be cured.
  • Early vaginal cancer may not cause symptoms and may be found during a routine Pap smear.
  • Age and exposure to the drug DES (diethylstilbestrol) before birth may affect a woman's risk of developing vaginal cancer.
clc graphic right column