In Memory of Billie Mount

Billie MountWhen you think of doilies, Navy seamen don’t usually come to mind. But Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) patient Billie Mount learned tatting—the art of making lace—while serving in the Korean War.
 
“I served on the U.S.S. Saint Paul in the Pacific, and along with working in the gun turrets, I was charged with making curtains for the captain’s yacht,” says Billie. “I used my knowledge of sailors’ knots to fashion the curtains.”
 
Now 82 years old, Billie still does tatting and wins awards for his delicate handiwork. After being treated at HCI for metastatic colon cancer, Billie chose to give away one of his works of art to his radiation oncologist, Chris Anker, MD. The piece took Billie 326 hours to complete and won first place at the county fair. Billie says he wanted to show his appreciation for receiving remarkably skilled and compassionate care.
 
“Dr. Anker is outstanding in radiation and is very personable,” says Billie. “He’s a wonderful doctor. In fact, there are no bad doctors here.”
 
When Billie received his cancer diagnosis, he knew he wanted to be treated at HCI even though he and his family live about 240 miles away in Parowan, Utah.
 
“We drive four hours every time we come up here,” says his daughter, Cheryl. “And it’s usually at least every two weeks we’re here for chemo. But we can’t think of anywhere we’d rather come than here.”
 
“There’s no finer facility [for cancer treatment],” Billie says. “This is the best place in the world.”