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Publications

Epidemiologic factors and survival by molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer

NIH/NCI R01 CA168758

Doherty, Rossing (MPI)

This study examines whether epidemiologic and genetic factors and survival differ by newly-defined molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer.
Role: Principal Investigator

A comparative transcriptome approach to elucidate drivers of carcinogenesis in ovarian cancer subtypes

NCCC Prouty Pilot Award

Doherty, Greene (MPI)

This study leverages population diversity to discover tumor drivers of ovarian cancer subtypes.
Role: Principal Investigator

Data-driven discovery of subtype-specific tumor genes from transcriptomes of diverse populations

American Cancer Society Research Grant

Greene (PI) This study uses transcriptomic profiling to identify and characterize subtypes of high-grade serous ovarian tumors that arise in diverse genetic and environmental backgrounds.
Role: Co-Investigator

Immunohistochemical markers of debulking status and ovarian cancer survival in African American women

Hitchcock Foundation Grant

Tafe (PI) This study examines molecular markers of debulking and ovarian cancer survival in African American women.
Role: Co-Investigator

Refining ovarian cancer subtype classifiers to incorporate biologic features

NIH/NCI F31 CA186625

Rudd (PI) This grant funds Dr. Doherty’s PhD student, James Rudd, to use bioinformatics approaches to develop an accurate classifier of ovarian cancer subtypes that performs well across diverse populations.
Role: Sponsor, PhD thesis advisor

Telomeres and lung cancer incidence and survival

NIH/NCI R01 CA151989

Doherty (PI) This study examines whether peripheral blood global and chromosome arm-specific telomere length, and variation in telomere-associated genes, is associated with lung cancer risk and survival.
Role: Principal Investigator

Telomere length and chromosomal instability across various tissue types

NIH/NHGRI U01 HG007601

Pierce (PI)This study examines whether peripheral blood global and chromosome arm-specific telomere length, and variation in telomere-associated genes, is associated with lung cancer risk and survival.
Role: Co-Investigator