Clinical Neurosciences Center

Neurology - Corticobasal Degeneration

Corticobasal Degeneration

Corticobasal degeneration is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by nerve cell loss and atrophy (shrinkage) of multiple areas of the brain including the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia. Corticobasal degeneration progresses gradually. Initial symptoms, which typically begin at or around age 60, may first appear on one side of the body (unilateral), but eventually affect both sides as the disease progresses. Symptoms are similar to those found in Parkinson disease, such as poor coordination, akinesia (an absence of movements), rigidity (a resistance to imposed movement), disequilibrium (impaired balance); and limb dystonia (abnormal muscle postures). Other symptoms such as cognitive and visual-spatial impairments, apraxia (loss of the ability to make familiar, purposeful movements), hesitant and halting speech, myoclonus (muscular jerks), and dysphagia (difficulty swallowing) may also occur. An individual with corticobasal degeneration eventually becomes unable to walk.

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The University of Utah PSP & Atypical Parkinsonism support group meets on the second Monday of every month. Please join us for our next support group meeting. Click here for more details.

Additional Resources:

WE MOVE (Worldwide Education & Awareness for Movement Disorders)

CUREPSP (Foundation for PSP|CBD and Related Brain Diseases)

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