amputee

About the Amputee Program

The University of Utah Amputee Program provides the most comprehensive, coordinated approach to amputee care in the Intermountain Region. As an all-inclusive approach to care and rehabilitation, the amputee program offers the best treatment options available for individuals with amputations. This care includes assessing and treating the patient as well as teaching them what to expect postoperatively. The goal of the treatment is to return patients with amputations to their highest level of physical capability.

Contact Us

(801) 587-7109

Outside the Salt Lake area: 888-587-7109

Amputation

What is amputation?

Amputation is surgery to remove all or part of an arm or leg. It may be done to treat injury, disease, or infection. It may also be done to remove tumors from bones and muscles.

Why might I need an amputation?

The most common reason for amputation is poor blood flow. This happens when arteries become narrowed or damaged. When this occurs in the arms or legs, it’s called peripheral arterial disease or PAD. PAD most often occurs between the ages of 50 to 75. It usually results from diabetes or atherosclerosis. This is a buildup of plaque inside the artery wall. Poor blood flow causes infection and death of tissue.

Other reasons you might need this procedure include injury, such as severe burn or accident, or cancer in a limb.

Amputation may also be done for serious infections that do not respond to antibiotics or other treatment. In some cases, it may be done due to frostbite or neuroma. This is a thickening of nerve tissue.

There may be other reasons you may need an amputation.

What are the risks for amputation?

People with diabetes, heart disease, or infection have a higher risk of complications from amputation than others. Above-knee amputations are riskier than below-knee amputations.

Other complications may include:

  • Joint deformity
  • A bruised area with blood that collects underneath the skin (hematoma)
  • Infection
  • Wound opening
  • Tissue death
  • Blood clot in the deep veins in the limb or in the lung

You may have other risks, based on your condition. Talk with your surgeon about any concerns you have before your amputation.

How do I prepare for an amputation?

Ask your surgeon to tell you what you should do before your amputation. Below is a list of common steps that you may be asked to do:

  • Your surgeon will explain the procedure and ask if you have any questions.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form that gives permission to do the procedure. Read the form carefully and ask questions if something is not clear.
  • Along with a complete medical history, your surgeon may do a physical exam to ensure you are in otherwise good health. You may have blood or other tests.
  • You will be asked to fast for 8 hours, generally after midnight.
  • If you are pregnant or think you may be, tell your surgeon.
  • Tell your surgeon if you are sensitive to or are allergic to any medications, latex, tape, or local and general anesthesia.
  • Tell your surgeon of all medicines (prescription and OTC) and herbal supplements that you are taking.
  • Tell your surgeon if you have a history of bleeding disorders or if you are taking any blood-thinning (anticoagulant) medicines, aspirin, or other medicines that affect blood clotting. You may be told to stop these medicines before the procedure.
  • You may be measured for an artificial limb.
  • You may receive a sedative to help you relax.
  • Based on your medical condition, your surgeon may request other specific preparation.

What happens during an amputation?

Talk with your surgeon about what to expect during your procedure. An amputation requires a stay in a hospital. Procedures may vary depending on the type of amputation, your condition, and your surgeon’s practices.

An amputation may be done while you are asleep under general anesthesia, or while you are awake under spinal anesthesia. If spinal anesthesia is used, you will have no feeling from your waist down. Your surgeon will discuss this with you in advance.

Generally, an amputation follows this process:

  1. You will be asked to remove any jewelry or other objects that may interfere with the procedure.
  2. You will be asked to remove your clothing and put on a gown.
  3. An IV line may be started in your arm or hand.
  4. You will be positioned on the operating table.
  5. The anesthesiologist will monitor your heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and blood oxygen level during the procedure.
  6. A thin, narrow tube (catheter) may be inserted into your bladder to drain urine.
  7. The skin over the surgical site will be cleansed with an antiseptic solution.
  8. To determine how much tissue to remove, the surgeon will check for a pulse at a joint close to the site. Skin temperatures, color, and the presence of pain in the diseased limb will be compared with those in a healthy limb.
  9. After the incision, your surgeon may decide that more of the limb needs to be removed. The surgeon will keep as much of the functional stump length as possible. He or she will also leave as much healthy skin as possible to cover the stump area.
  10. If the amputation is due to injury, the crushed bone will be removed and smoothed out to help with the use of an artificial limb. If needed, temporary drains that will drain blood and other fluids may be inserted.
  11. After completely removing the dead tissue, the surgeon may decide to close the flaps. This is called a closed amputation. Or the surgeon may decide to leave the site open. This is called open flap amputation. In a closed amputation, the wound will be sutured shut right away. This is usually done if there is little risk of infection. In an open flap amputation, the skin will remain drawn back from the amputation site for several days so any infected tissue can be cleaned off. At a later time, once the stump tissue is clean and free of infection, the skin flaps will be sutured together to close the wound.
  12. A sterile bandage or dressing will be applied. The type of dressing used will depend on the surgical technique done.
  13. The surgeon may place a stocking over the amputation site to hold drainage tubes and wound dressings, or the limb may be placed in traction or a splint, depending on your situation.

What happens after an amputation?

In the hospital

After the procedure, you will be taken to the recovery room. Your recovery will vary depending on the type of procedure done and anesthesia used. The circulation and sensation of the affected extremity will be monitored. Once your blood pressure, pulse, and breathing are stable and you are alert, you will be taken to your hospital room.

You will get pain medicines and antibiotics as needed. The dressing will be changed and watched closely.

You will start physical therapy soon after your surgery. Rehabilitation is designed for your specific needs. It may include gentle stretching, special exercises, and help getting in and out of bed or a wheelchair. If you had a leg amputation, you will learn how to bear weight on your remaining limb.

There are specialists who make and fit prosthetic devices. They will visit you soon after surgery and will instruct you how to use the prosthesis. You may begin to practice with your artificial limb as early as 10 to 14 days after your surgery, depending on your comfort and wound healing process.

After amputation, you will stay in the hospital for several days. You will get instructions as to how to change your dressing. You will be discharged home when the healing process is going well and you are able to take care of yourself with assistance.

After surgery, you may have emotional concerns. You may have grief over the lost limb or a physical condition known as phantom pain. This is a sense of feeling pain or sensation in your amputated limb. If this is the case, you may receive medicines or other types of nonsurgical approaches.

At home

Once you are home, it is important to follow the instructions given to you by your surgeon. You will have detailed instructions on how to care for the surgical site, dressing changes, bathing, activity level, and physical therapy.

Take a pain reliever for soreness as advised by your surgeon. Aspirin or certain other pain medicines may increase the chance of bleeding. Be sure to take only recommended medicines.

Tell your surgeon if you have any of the following:

  • Fever and/or chills
  • Redness, swelling, or bleeding or other drainage from the incision site
  • Increased pain around the amputation site
  • Numbness and/or tingling in the remaining arm or leg

You may resume your normal diet unless your surgeon tells you differently. Your surgeon may give you other instructions, depending on your situation.

Long-term care

There have been many advances over the past several years in the surgery, rehabilitation, and prosthetic design. Proper healing and fitting of the artificial limb help to reduce the risk of long-term complications. An amputation requires adapting many parts of your life. Physical therapy can help.

If the amputation was the result of PAD, continued steps will need to be taken to prevent the condition so that it does not affect other parts of your body.

You may be advised to adopt the following lifestyle changes to help stop the progression of PAD. This includes:

  • Maintain a healthy diet that does not exceed your daily calorie requirement and that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Work towards getting or keeping an ideal body weight.
  • Maintain a regular exercise program.

Next steps

Before you agree to the test or the procedure make sure you know:

  • The name of the test or procedure
  • The reason you are having the test or procedure
  • The risks and benefits of the test or procedure
  • When and where you are to have the test or procedure and who will do it
  • When and how will you get the results
  • How much will you have to pay for the test or procedure

Stephen K. Aoki, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Dr. Stephen K. Aoki, Associate Professor, specializes in hip and knee sports medicine. His clinical practice and research focus on both adult and pediatric sports injuries. Current interests include hip preservation/femoroacetabular impingement in the young adult, hip arthroscopy, the pediatric and adolescent athlete, ACL tears in children, patella... Read More

Alexej Barg, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Dr. Alexej Barg specializes in the care of the foot and ankle and traumatic injuries to the lower extremity. Dr. Barg’s expertise is to perform reconstructive surgery of the foot and ankle. Special interests include total ankle replacement and joint preserving procedures in patients with ankle osteoarthritis, sports injuries of the foot and ankle a... Read More

Specialties:

Foot and Ankle, Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Farmington Health Center (801) 213-3200
University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Timothy C. Beals, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Timothy Beals, Associate Professor, specializes in foot and ankle care. His areas of expertise include operative and non-operative management of traumatic injuries, arthritic conditions, adult flatfoot deformities, neuromuscular disorders, complications of diabetes, and use of the Ilizarov technique. His research interests include outcome asses... Read More

Shannon L. Boffeli, APRN

Shannon Boffeli, a nurse practitioner, works with the orthopaedic trauma team at the University of Utah Orthopaedic Center. His clinical interests include fractures of the long bones, pelvis, and nonunions.Shannon has worked as a Nurse Practitioner in the University of Utah Department of Orthopaedic Trauma since 2003.Shannon Boffeli received his BS... Read More

Darrel S. Brodke, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Darrel S. Brodke, MD is a board certified spine specialist with expertise in the care of neck and back problems, including disc herniations, spinal stenosis, degenerative conditions, deformities and trauma of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. Dr. Brodke received his MD at the University of California, San Francisco, completed an Orthopaedic... Read More

Robert T. Burks, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Dr. Robert Burks, Professor, specializing in the field of sports medicine and shoulder surgery. His practice focuses on injuries to and degenerative conditions of the shoulder and knee. Dr. Burks graduated from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1978. He completed his orthopedic residency at the University of California at San Diego and sub... Read More

Dorian J. Carroll, PA-C

Dorian J. Carroll, MPAS, PA-C joined the Department of Orthopaedics in February of 2016. He is a Nationally Certified Physician Assistant specializing in Orthopaedic Spine Surgery. He received a bachelor’s degree in Biology from Arcadia University and completed his medical training at Philadelphia University obtaining a Master’s Degree in Physician... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Physician Assistant

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Kristen L. Carroll, M.D.

Dr. Kristen Carroll is a Professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Chief of staff Shriners Hospital. She specializes in the areas of pediatric hip and foot abnormalities, both congenital and neuromuscular in origin. Her research interests include neuromuscular and complex hip disorders, skeletal dysplasias and complex foot and ankle d... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Shriners Hospital for Children (801) 536-3564

Don Coleman, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.4

4.4 out of 5

Dr. Donald Coleman, Associate Professor, trained at the University of Utah, completed his residency at the University of Iowa, a fellowship at the University of Edinburgh Arthritis Unit in Scotland, and a fellowship in hand and microvascular surgery at Duke University. His active clinical practice is exclusively restricted to upper extremity and mi... Read More

Anna Dean, PA-C

Annabeth Dean, PA-C, is a Physician Assistant at the University of Utah Orthopedic Center with the Foot and Ankle Team. She specializes in foot and ankle care particularly, sports injuries, non-operative fractures, arthritic conditions, plantar fasciitis and tendinitis.  She is also a first assistant in surgery with Dr. Timothy Beals.Annabeth Dean ... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Jill A. Erickson, PA-C

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Jill Erickson has worked with our Adult Reconstruction Surgeons since 1999, and with Christopher Peters, M.D. exclusively since 2003, with Joint Replacements as well as Hip Preservation procedures. She is an integral member of our University of Utah Center for Hip & Knee Reconstruction team and coordinates our research, surgical and clinical ou... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5600

Scott Ford, PA-C

Scott Ford, PA-C is an orthopaedic physician assistant who practices in Primary Children's Hospital. His clinical interests include pediatric fractures, sports medicine and developmental orthopaedic conditions.... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5600

Jeremy M. Gililland, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Dr. Gililland specializes in adult reconstructive orthopedic surgery of the hip and knee. He performs routine and complex primary and revision joint replacement operations. Additionally, his focuses include partial knee replacement and direct anterior total hip arthroplasty. He considers himself very fortunate to have a profession that he is passi... Read More

Patrick E. Greis, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Dr. Patrick Greis, Board Certified Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, joined the Department of Orthopaedics in March of 1997 and specializes in sports medicine, knee and shoulder surgery. His interests include all aspects of knee and shoulder surgery, including arthroscopic surgery, ACL reconstruction, shoulder instability, rotator cuff issues, arth... Read More

Justin M. Haller, M.D.

Justin Haller, MD specializes in pelvic and acetabular trauma, non-union and mal-union surgery, peri-articular fractures, post-traumatic reconstruction, limb length and rotational deformity, osteomyelitis and bone infections, and pediatric orthopedic trauma. He is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Orthodpedics.  He has a clinical practice ... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Spine Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton
Orthopedics
(801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5600

Theresa A. Hennessey, M.D.

Dr. Theresa Hennessey, Assistant Professor, has been with the Department of Orthopaedics since 2006, when she completed her fellowship in Pediatric Orthopaedics. Her practice is primarily at Shriners Hospital for Children in Salt Lake City. Dr. Hennessey practices General Pediatric Orthopaedics, her areas of particular interest include clubfeet,... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Shriners Hospital for Children (801) 536-3564

Thomas F. Higgins, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Thomas Higgins is a Tenured Professor at the University of Utah, Department of Orthopaedics. His medical degree was completed at Brown University, School of Medicine. His orthopaedic training was at Yale University, and post-graduate fellowship at the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore. He has been on the faculty at University of ... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Trauma, Trauma Surgery

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 587-7109
University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Stephanie M. Holmes, M.D.

Dr. Stephanie Holmes, Assistant Professor (clinical), is a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at Primary Children’s Medical Center. She completed her medical education at John Hopkins University School of Medicine and her residency at Yale University School of Medicine, followed by a fellowship at the University of Utah in Pediatric Orthopaedics. Dr. Ho... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 662-5600

Douglas T. Hutchinson, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Dr. Doug Hutchinson, Associate Professor In Department of Orthopaedics, specializes in hand and microvascular surgery. Dr. Hutchinson currently serves as the hand fellowship director at the University of Utah and chief of Hand Surgery at Primary Children’s Medical Center, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Shriners Intermountain Hospital. He... Read More

Specialties:

Congenital Hand, Hand Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic, Hand Upper Extremity & Microvascular Surgery, Pediatric Hand

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-5600
University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Sandy K. Johnson, PA-C

Sandy Johnson is a nationally certified Physician Assistant who specializes in total joint replacement and traumatic fracture care. Her clinical focus includes anterior approach aka minimally invasive hip replacement, care of nonunion and malunion fractures, and revision total joint arthroplasty. In our clinic she provides and coordinates preope... Read More

Kevin B. Jones, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.9

4.9 out of 5

Specializing in the evaluation, diagnosis, and surgical management of sarcomas, tumors arising in bone and soft-tissue, Dr. Jones sees both pediatric and adult patients. His practice also includes surgery for benign bone tumors such as giant cell tumor of bone, chondromyxoid fibroma, osteochondromas, and others as well as stabilization of the bones... Read More

Specialties:

Oncology Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Sarcoma Surgery

Locations:

Huntsman Cancer Institute
Clinic 2E, Sarcoma
(801) 585-0262
PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 662-5600

Nikolas H. Kazmers, M.D., M.S.E.

Nikolas H. Kazmers, M.D. M.S.E. is a Clinical Instructor of Orthopedic Hand Surgery at the University of Utah Hospital and Clinics who exclusively specializes in hand and upper extremity (elbow / forearm / wrist) problems, and microvascular surgery. He treats upper extremity disorders such as fractures, dislocations, lacerations to nerves and tendo... Read More

Naomi R. Laird, P.A.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Naomi Laird, PA-C, Physician Assistant with the Foot and Ankle Service at the University of Utah Orthopedic Center.   Specializes in foot and ankle care at the UUOC and general orthopedics one day a week at the VA.  Naomi’s clinical interests include patient education for various foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries of the foot and ankle, dia... Read More

Brandon Lawrence, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Lawrence is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon specializing in adult and pediatric cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine disorders. Dr. Lawrence focuses his practice in degenerative and traumatic conditions of the spine including disc degeneration and herniation, spinal stenosis, spinal deformity, spinal trauma, spinal tumors and spinal infe... Read More

Travis G. Maak, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Travis Maak’s practice is focused on sports medicine and arthroscopic treatment of the hip, knee and shoulder. He is the Head Orthopaedic Team Physician for the Utah Jazz and Assistant Professor in the Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah. Dr. Maak is originally from Salt Lake City and a graduate from Stanford University. He co... Read More

M. Shaun Machen, M.D.

Dr. M. Shaun Machen is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon with sub-specialty fellowship training in Pediatric Orthopaedics and sub-specialty board certification in Sports Medicine. He enjoys caring for all pediatric orthopaedic conditions and especially enjoys pediatric and young adult Sports Medicine and Trauma. He completed an Orthopaedic Res... Read More

Specialties:

ACL Reconstruction, Cartilage Restoration, Hip Dysplasia, Knee, Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Trauma, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

NW Plaza at Utah Valley Medical Center
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 357-4470

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Jason T. Montgomery, PA-C

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Nationally Certified Physician Assistant who joined the Department of Orthopaedics in July 2010. He completed his training at Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, Virginia, and then completed in internship with Central Utah Clinic Cardiology. His undergraduate work was done in the field of behavioral health, at Utah Valley University. Jas... Read More

Florian Nickisch, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Florian Nickisch, Associate Professor in the Department of Orthopaedics specializes in the care of the foot and ankle and traumatic injuries to the lower extremity. Dr. Nickisch’s clinical interests include acute and subacute traumatic injuries to the foot and ankle (Achilles Tendon ruptures, calcaneus fractures, talus fractures midfoot fractur... Read More

Christopher E. Pelt, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Dr. Pelt specializes in hip replacement and revision, and knee replacement and revision. Minimally invasive joint replacement, partial knee replacement (unicompartmental, patellofemoral), cruciate preserving knee replacement, and direct anterior hip replacement are all aspects of his practice. Dr. Pelt is an Assistant Professor in the Department o... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Reconstruction, Direct Anterior Hip Replacement, Hip Dysplasia, Hip Instability, Hip Replacement, Hip Revision, Joint Infection, Joint Replacement, Knee Replacement, Knee Revision, Labral Tear, Minimally Invasive Joint Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Oxford Partial Knee Replacement, Patello-Femoral Arthroplasty (PFA), Uni-Compartmental Knee Arthroplasty, Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

Locations:

University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Christopher L. Peters, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Chris Peters, Professor, specializes in adult reconstructive orthopaedic surgery of the hip and knee. He performs routine and complex joint replacements and bioregenerative hip preserving operations. One of his specialties includes the treatment of hip pain in young adults from acetabular dysplasia and/or femoro-acetabular impingement with pelv... Read More

R. Lor Randall, M.D., FACS

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

R. Lor Randall, MD, FACS, is the Director of Sarcoma Services at the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute and Primary Children’s Medical Center. He is a Professor of Orthopaedics and The L.B. & Olive S. Young Endowed Chair for Cancer Research. Randall has an international reputation in sarcoma surgery and care, working with clinici... Read More

Specialties:

Oncology Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Sarcoma

Locations:

Huntsman Cancer Institute
Clinic 2D, Sarcoma
(801) 585-0206
PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 662-5600

John R. Raskind, M.D.

John R. Raskind, M.D. is an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedics. He has a clinical practice at the Salt Lake City Veteran's Administration Hospital. His areas of interest include arthroscopic surgery, sports medicine and orthopaedic resident education. Dr. Raskind completed his residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at the Unive... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Veterans Administration Medical Center

David Rothberg, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

David L Rothberg, MD. - His area of clinical expertise includes pelvic and acetabular trauma, non-union/mal-union, peri-articular fractures, pediatric orthopaedic trauma, and post-traumatic reconstruction. He is an instructor in the Department of Orthopaedics, He has a clinical practice at the University of Utah Hospital and Clinics, Primary Childr... Read More

Charles L. Saltzman, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Charles Saltzman is the Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah where he serves as the LS Peery Presidential Endowed Professor. For over two decades, Dr. Saltzman has focused on improving physical function of patients with limited mobility. His primary interests include care of patients with ankle arthritis, sports ... Read More

Specialties:

Foot and Ankle, Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Stephen D. Santora, M.D.

Dr. Steve Santora, Associate Professor (clinical) joined the Department of Orthopaedics in January 2001. Dr. Santora is an orthopaedic surgeon at Shriners Hospitals for Children, Salt Lake City. His orthopaedic interests include clubfeet and scoliosis. His educational background includes an internship from the University of California at Irvine, or... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Spine Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

John T. Smith, M.D.

Dr. Smith is a Professor, in the Department of Orthopaedics, practicing at Primary Children’s Medical Center and the University of Utah. His current practice is focused on the treatment of spine deformities in children and adolescents. Dr. Smith received his M.D. at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He completed his residency at the Univers... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Spine Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 662-5600

William Ryan Spiker, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Spiker treats conditions of the neck and back such as disk herniations, spinal stenosis, cervical myelopathy and deformities of the spine. He believes in the thoughtful use of new technologies, including minimally invasive surgery and image-guided techniques. As an Assistant Professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University ... Read More

Nicholas Spina, M.D.

Nicholas Spina, MD, is a member of the University Of Utah Department Of Orthopaedic Surgery.  He specializes in degenerative, traumatic, and oncologic conditions of the spine including lumbar stenosis, cervical myelopathy, and scoliosis.  He employs a conservative approach in treating the spine.  Dr. Spina’s focus is in restoring patients’ function... Read More

Peter M. Stevens, M.D.

Dr. Stevens practices through the University of Utah School of Medicine at Primary Children’s Medical Center. He completed his medical training at Albany Medical College, Orhopedic Residency at the University of Utah and Pediatric Orthopedic Fellowship at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A diplomate of the American Board of Or... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 662-5600

Alan K. Stotts, M.D.

Dr. Alan Stotts, Associate Professor (clinical) specializes in pediatric orthopaedic surgery, with fellowship training in the full spectrum of childhood orthopaedic conditions. Dr. Stotts’ clinical interests include the treatment of children with congenital and developmental orthopaedic conditions, neuromuscular disease, hip disorders, deformity of... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

PCH Outpatient Services at Riverton (801) 285-1440
Primary Children's Hospital
Pediatric Orthopaedics
(801) 662-5600

Robert Z. Tashjian, B.A., M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. Robert Tashjian is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, UT specializing in shoulder and elbow surgery. Dr. Tashjian received his medical doctorate from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, MA. He completed an orthopaedic residency at Brown Medical School in Providence, ... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Shoulder

Locations:

Northern Utah Clinic-The Lodge (435) 723-0540
University Orthopaedic Center (801) 587-7109

Andrew Tyser, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Andrew R. Tyser M.D. is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Utah Hospital and Clinics who exclusively specializes in hand, upper extremity (elbow / forearm), and microvascular surgery. He treats upper extremity disorders such as fractures, dislocations, lacerations to nerves and tendons, and all other injuries of the h... Read More

Angela A. Wang, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.3

4.3 out of 5

Dr. Angela Wang, Associate Professor, specializes in hand, upper extremity, and microvascular surgery in children and adults. Dr. Wang currently practices at the Orthopaedic Center, as well as the Primary Children's Center, and the Shriners Hospital. Her particular interests include both obstetric/birth and adult traumatic brachial plexus surgery,... Read More

Marcella R. Woiczik, M.D.

Dr. Marcella Woiczik has a general pediatric orthopaedic practice based primarily at Shriners Hospitals for Children, Salt Lake City. Her scope of practice includes the management of pediatric trauma (at Primary Children's Medical Center), lower extremity and foot deformities (i.e clubfeet), as well as congenital, neuromuscular, and genetic disord... Read More

Specialties:

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

Shriners Hospital for Children (801) 536-3600

Specialties:

Adult Reconstruction, Orthopaedic Surgery

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

University Orthopaedic Center 590 Wakara Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
Map
801-587-7109
South Jordan Health Center 5126 W. Daybreak Parkway
South Jordan, UT 84009
Map
801-213-4500
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