baby

Having a baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is an emotional rollercoaster for any parent. But having a team of Pediatric Neonatology specialists who provide cutting-edge technology with sensitive, healing hands, can help a parent get through this chapter with a little more ease.

Babies born within the Intermountain West's five-state region with severe, life-threatening conditions are treated by our team of Pediatric Neonatology specialists. They receive medical and surgical interventions for serious congenital birth defects such as defects of the heart, brain, and internal organs and infant treatment for sepsis, pulmonary hypertension, and prematurity with additional complications.

We support infants through their life-threatening conditions and provide high frequency jet ventilation, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (a device which circulates and oxygenates blood to allow the infant's heart or lungs to heal), cerebral/regional oximetry to monitor perfusion of specific organs, and total body cooling for brain injury.

Contact Us

(801) 581-7052

Primary Children’s Hospital Attending Physician (24/7) (801) 662-4100

Prematurity

What is prematurity?

A baby born before 37 weeks of pregnancy is considered premature or born too early. The number of premature births in the U.S. is rising. Twins and other multiples are more likely to be premature than single birth babies. 

Other terms often used for prematurity are preterm and preemie. Many premature babies weigh less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces. They may be referred to as low birth weight. Babies born before 34 weeks of pregnancy are often called early preterm.

Babies born between 34 and 37 weeks of pregnancy are often called late preterm or near-term infants. 

What causes prematurity?

Premature birth may have a number of causes. Some things directly cause early labor and birth. Others can make the mother or baby sick and need early delivery. Sometimes the exact cause for a premature birth is unknown. This can be true even though the mother may have done everything right during the pregnancy.

Who is at risk for prematurity?

Many women have no known risk factors for premature birth. But several things can make premature birth more likely.

Risks for the mother include:

  • Having had a previous preterm labor or birth
  • Carrying twins, triplets, or more babies at one time
  • Having an abnormal cervix or uterus
  • Being younger than 20 or older than 35
  • Being African American
  • Having long-term health problems such as heart disease or kidney disease
  • Smoking
  • Using illegal drugs such as cocaine

Pregnancy risks include having any of the following:

  • Infections
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Blood clotting problems
  • Problems with the placenta
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Short time between pregnancies

Certain developmental problems can put unborn babies at higher risk for prematurity.

What are the symptoms of prematurity?

The following are the most common symptoms of a premature baby. But each baby may show slightly different symptoms. Symptoms may include:

  • Small size. Premature babies often weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces.
  • Thin, shiny, pink or red skin. You are able to see veins through the skin.
  • Little body fat
  • Little scalp hair. But the baby may have lots of soft body hair (lanugo)
  • Weak cry
  • Poor muscle tone
  • Male and female genitals are small and underdeveloped

The symptoms of prematurity may look like other health conditions. Make sure your child sees his or her healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is prematurity diagnosed?

A baby born before 37 weeks of pregnancy is considered premature or born too early. Babies born before 34 weeks of pregnancy are often called early preterm. Babies born between 34 and 37 weeks of pregnancy are often called late preterm or near-term infants.

How is prematurity treated?

Treatment will depend on your child’s symptoms, age, and general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is.

Treatment may include:

  • Corticosteroid medicine for the mother to help the baby’s lungs grow and mature before birth
  • Monitoring the baby’s temperature, blood pressure, heart and breathing rates, and oxygen levels
  • Temperature-controlled bed
  • Oxygen given by mask or with a breathing machine called a ventilator
  • IV fluids, feedings, or medicines
  • Special feedings with a tube in the stomach if a baby cannot suck
  • X-rays or other imaging tests
  • Skin-to-skin contact with the parents (kangaroo care)

What are the complications of prematurity?

Premature babies are cared for by a neonatologist. This is a doctor with special training to care for newborns. Other specialists may also care for babies, depending on their health problems.

Premature babies are born before their bodies and organ systems have completely matured. These babies may be small. They may weigh less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces. They may need help breathing, eating, fighting infection, and staying warm. Very premature babies, those born before 28 weeks, are at the greatest risk for problems. Their organs and body systems may not be ready for life outside the mother’s womb. And they may be too immature to function well.

Some of the problems premature babies may have include:

  • Keeping their body temperature steady or staying warm
  • Breathing problems, including serious short- and long-term problems
  • Blood problems. These include low red blood cell counts (anemia), yellow-color to the skin from breaking down old red blood cells (jaundice), or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia).
  • Kidney problems
  • Digestive problems, including difficulty feeding and poor digestion
  • Nervous system problems, including bleeding in the brain or seizures
  • Infections

Premature babies can have long-term health problems as well. Generally, the more premature the baby, the more serious and long-lasting are the health problems.

Can prematurity be prevented?

More babies are surviving even though they are born early and are very small. It is best to prevent preterm labor if possible.

It's important to get good prenatal care while you are pregnant. Your healthcare provider can help find problems and suggest lifestyle changes to lower the risk for preterm labor and birth. Some ways to help prevent prematurity include:

  • Stopping smoking if you smoke. You should stop smoking before you are pregnant.
  • Finding out if you are at risk for preterm labor
  • Learning the symptoms of preterm labor
  • Getting treated for preterm labor

Your healthcare provider may give you the hormone progesterone if you are at high risk for preterm birth. Progesterone can help if you have had a previous preterm birth. 

How is prematurity managed?

Premature babies often need time to "catch up" in both development and growth. In the hospital, this catch-up time may involve learning to eat and sleep, as well as steadily gaining weight. Babies may stay in the hospital until they reach the pregnancy due date. They may be cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and an intermediate NICU.

Talk with your baby's healthcare provider about when your baby will be able to go home. In general, babies can go home when they:

  • Have no serious health conditions
  • Can stay warm in an open crib
  • Take all feedings by breast or bottle
  • Have no recent periods of not breathing (apnea) or low heart rate

Before discharge, premature babies need an eye exam and hearing test to check for problems related to prematurity. You must be able to give care, including medicines and feedings, before your baby can go home. You will  also need information about follow-up visits with the baby's healthcare provider and vaccines. Many hospitals have special follow-up healthcare programs for premature and low-birth-weight babies.

Even though they are otherwise ready to go home, some babies still have special needs. This includes things such as extra oxygen or tube feedings. You will learn how to take care of your baby if he or she needs these things. Hospital staff can help set up special home care.

Ask your baby’s healthcare provider about a "trial run" overnight stay in a parenting room at the hospital before your baby is discharged. This can help you adjust to caring for your baby while healthcare providers are nearby for help and reassurance. You may also feel more confident taking your baby home when you know infant CPR and safety.

Premature babies are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). You should always put your baby down to sleep on his or her back.

Key points about prematurity

  • Babies born before 37 weeks of pregnancy are considered premature or born too early.
  • Many premature babies also weigh less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces. They may be referred to as low birth weight.
  • Premature babies can have long-term health problems. In general, the more premature the baby, the more serious and long-lasting are the health problems.
  • Prenatal care is a key factor in preventing preterm births and low-birth-weight babies.
  • Premature babies are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Even though they are otherwise ready for discharge, some premature babies still need special care when they go home.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your child’s healthcare provider:

  • Know the reason for the visit and what you want to happen.
  • Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.
  • At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you for your child.
  • Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed and how it will help your child. Also know what the side effects are.
  • Ask if your child’s condition can be treated in other ways.
  • Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean.
  • Know what to expect if your child does not take the medicine or have the test or procedure.
  • If your child has a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.
  • Know how you can contact your child’s provider after office hours. This is important if your child becomes ill and you have questions or need advice.

Low Birth Weight

What is low birth weight?

Low birth weight is a term used to describe babies who are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams). An average newborn usually weighs about 8 pounds. A low-birth-weight baby may be healthy even though he or she is small. But a low-birth-weight baby can also have many serious health problems.

What causes low birth weight?

Low birth weight is most often caused by being born too early (premature birth). That means before 37 weeks of pregnancy. A premature baby has less time in the mother's womb (uterus) to grow and gain weight. Much of a baby's weight is gained during the last weeks of pregnancy.

Another cause of low birth weight is a condition called intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). This occurs when a baby does not grow well during pregnancy. It may be because of problems with the placenta, the mother's health, or the baby's health. Babies can have IUGR and be:

  • Full term. That means born from 37 to 41 weeks of pregnancy. These babies may be physically mature, but small.
  • Premature. These babies are both very small and physically immature.

Which babies are at risk for low birth weight?

In addition to premature birth and IUGR, things that affect the pregnant woman can increase the risk of having a low birth weight baby. They include:
  • Infection during pregnancy
  • Not gaining enough weight during pregnancy
  • Previous pregnancy with a low-birth-weight baby
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol or drug use
  • Age less than 17 or more than 35 years
  • African-American background

What are the symptoms of low birth weight?

In addition to weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces, babies with low birth weight look much smaller than babies of normal birth weight. A low-birth-weight baby's head may look bigger than the rest of his or her body. He or she often looks thin with little body fat.

How is low birth weight diagnosed?

One of the main reasons for regular prenatal exams is to make sure your baby is growing well. During pregnancy, the size of your fetus is estimated in different ways. Your steady weight gain is one way of checking on fetal growth. Another way is fundal height:
  • To check fundal height, your healthcare provider measures from the top of your pubic bone to the top of your uterus (fundus).
  • Fundal height is measured in centimeters (cm). It is about the same as the number of weeks of pregnancy after the 20th week. For example, at 24 weeks' gestation, your fundal height should be close to 24 cm.
  • If the fundal height is less than expected, it may mean the baby is not growing well.

Your healthcare provider may also use fetal ultrasound to check your baby's growth and development. Ultrasound uses sound waves to create a picture of your fetus. It is a more accurate than checking fundal height. Measurements can be taken of your baby's head, belly (abdomen), and upper leg bone (femur). These measurements are used to estimate his or her weight.

Babies are weighed within the first few hours after birth. The weight is compared against the number of weeks of pregnancy (gestational age). If your baby weighs less than 2,500 grams (5 pounds, 8 ounces), he or she has a low birth weight. Babies weighing less than 1,500 grams (3 pounds, 5 ounces) at birth are considered very low birth weight.

How is low birth weight treated?

Treatment will depend on your child’s symptoms, age, and general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is.

Treatment for low birth weight often includes:

  • Care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)
  • Temperature-controlled bed
  • Special feedings. Sometimes these are given through a tube into the stomach if a baby cannot suck. Or they are given through an IV (intravenous) line.

How well a baby with low birth weight does depends largely on how much the baby weighs at birth. Babies who weigh less than 1 pound, 1.5 ounces (500 grams) have the most problems and are less likely to survive.

Low-birth-weight babies typically "catch up" in physical growth if they have no other complications. Babies may need to have special follow-up healthcare programs.

What are the complications of low birth weight?

Low-birth-weight babies often have problems. The baby's tiny body is not as strong as a baby of normal birth weight. He or she may have a harder time eating, gaining weight, and fighting infection. Low-birth-weight babies often have a hard time staying warm because they don't have much fat on their bodies.

Babies that are born premature often have complications. It is sometimes hard to tell if the problems are because they were born early, or because they are so small. In general, the lower the birth weight, the greater the risk for complications. The following are some of the common problems of low-birth-weight babies:

  • Low oxygen levels at birth
  • Difficulty staying warm
  • Difficulty feeding and gaining weight
  • Infection
  • Breathing problems and immature lungs (infant respiratory distress syndrome)
  • Nervous system problems, such as bleeding inside the brain (intraventricular hemorrhage)
  • Digestive problems, such as serious infection of the intestines (necrotizing enterocolitis)
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

Babies with very low birth weight are at risk for long-term complications and disability. Long-term complications may include:

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Blindness
  • Deafness
  • Developmental delay 

Talk with your baby's healthcare provider for information about your baby's risks for complications.

Can low birth weight be prevented?

More babies are surviving even though they are born early and are very small. This is because of advances in the care of sick and premature babies. But preventing preterm births is one of the best ways to prevent babies born with low birth weight.

Regular prenatal care is the best way to prevent preterm births and low-birth-weight babies. At prenatal visits, the healthcare provider will check the health of you and your fetus. It is important to:

  • Follow a healthy diet during pregnancy. This will help you to gain enough weight to help your baby grow and help you stay healthy. 
  • Not drink alcohol, smoke, or use drugs. All of these can cause low birth weight and other problems for your baby. 

Key points about low birth weight

  • Low birth weight is a term used to describe babies who are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams).
  • Babies weighing less than 3 pounds, 5 ounces (1,500 grams) at birth are considered very low birth weight.
  • Low birth weight is most often caused by premature birth.
  • Nearly all low-birth-weight babies need special care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) until they gain weight and are well enough to go home.
  • Regular prenatal care is the best way to prevent preterm births and low-birth-weight babies.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your child’s healthcare provider:

  • Know the reason for the visit and what you want to happen.
  • Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.
  • At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you for your child.
  • Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed and how it will help your child. Also know what the side effects are.
  • Ask if your child’s condition can be treated in other ways.
  • Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean.
  • Know what to expect if your child does not take the medicine or have the test or procedure.
  • If your child has a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.
  • Know how you can contact your child’s provider after office hours. This is important if your child becomes ill and you have questions or need advice.

Mariana C. Baserga, M.D.

Mariana Baserga, M.D. is an Associate Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. She is the director of the Neonatal AirMed team. She provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain M... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Ryann Bierer, M.D.

Ryann Bierer, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. She provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Among her responsibilities is educatin... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Ronald S. Bloom, M.D.

Ronald S. Bloom, M.D. is a Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He provides neonatology service at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital. Among his responsibilities is educating Pediatric Residents, Neonatology Fellows and Neonatal Nurse Practitioners. He was pres... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Luca Brunelli, M.D., Ph.D.

Luca Brunelli, M.D., Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Among his responsibilities is e... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Belinda Chan, M.D.

Belinda Chan, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. She provides neonatology services at three facilities: the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Dr. Chan’s r... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-4100

Gary M. Chan, M.D.

Gary M. Chan, M.D. is a Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Among his responsibilities is educating Pediatric ... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Robert D. Christensen, M.D.

Robert D. Christensen, MD is a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Neonatology and Division of Hematology/Oncology Dr. Christensen received his medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, he completed his Pediatric residency at Stanford University Hospital, and his Neonatolog... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Robert J. DiGeronimo, M.D.

Robert DiGeronimo, MD, is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He currently serves as the Medical Director for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Primary Children´s Hospital as well as for the neonatal ECMO program. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal ... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Jack L. Dolcourt, M.D., M.Ed.

Jack Dolcourt, M.D., M.Ed. is a Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He is the Associate Dean for Continuing Medical Education. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountai... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Roger G. Faix, M.D.

Roger G. Faix, M.D. is a Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Among his responsibilities is educating Pediatri... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Candice D. Fike, M.D.

Dr. Fike received her medical degree from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado and completed her Pediatric residency at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson, Arizona.  She then completed a Neonatology fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX followed by a research fellowship at t... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-4100

Camille M. Fung, M.D.

Camille Fung, MD is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. In addition to caring for sick newborns who require intensive care in 3 different NICUs in the Salt Lake valley, she has a basic science research interest in looking at the effects of perinatal insults s... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Jerald D. King, M.D.

Jerald King, M.D. is a Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine and the Director of Education and Outreach for the Division of Neonatology. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Inte... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Con Yee Ling, M.D.

Con Yee Ling, M.D. is an Associate Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. She provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Among her responsibilities is educatin... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Lonnie J. Miner, M.D.

Lonnie J. Miner, M.D, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah, School of Medicine. He provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hospital, Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Among his responsibilities is educa... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Elizabeth A. O'Brien, M.D.

Elizabeth O’Brien, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neonatology. She serves as Medical Director for the Newborn Intensive Care Unit and the Director of the Urban Central Region at Intermountain Medical Center. She provides neonatology services at three facilities, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Utah Hosp... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Shrena Patel, M.D.

Shrena Patel, M.D. is an attending neonatologist for the Newborn Intensive Care Units at Primary Children's Medical Center, the University of Utah Medical Center and Intermountain Medical Center. She is the Associate Medical Director at Primary Children's Hospital. Dr. Patel provides care for premature infants, critically ill newborns and newborn... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Hari P. Shanmugam, M.B.B.S.

Hari P. Shanmugam, M.D., is an Instructor in the Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics.Dr. Shanmugam received her medical degree, M.B.B.S., from the PSG Institute of Medical Science and Research in India, followed by a one year internship, and she worked as a physician in India.  Dr. Shanmugam completed residency training in Pediatrics ... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Primary Children's Hospital (801) 662-4100

Bradley A. Yoder, M.D.

Bradley Yoder, MD is Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Director of University Hospital Newborn Intensive Care Unit. Dr. Yoder oversees the development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines within the NICU. Dr. Yoder is directly involved in a number of clinical research studies and quality improvement projects aimed at improving th... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Christian Con Yost, M.D.

Christian Con Yost, MD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics within the University of Utah School of Medicine, and serves as the Director of the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship training program at the University of Utah. He provides clinical care as an attending physician to critically ill patients admitted to the newbor... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745

Erin Zinkhan, M.D.

Dr. Erin Zinkhan received her medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas. She completed her Pediatrics Residency and Neonatology Fellowship at the University of Utah. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Utah in the Division of Neonatology. Her clinical interests in... Read More

Specialties:

Neonatology

Locations:

Intermountain Medical Center (801) 507-7000
Primary Children's Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 662-4100
University Hospital
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
(801) 581-2745
Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) 100 N. Mario Capecchi Dr.
Salt Lake City, UT 84113
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University Hospital 50 N. Medical Dr.
Salt Lake City, UT 84113
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Intermountain Medical Center 5121 Cottonwood St.
Murray, UT 84107
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