'; echo $canstring; ?> Preparing for Your Appointment - - Radiology Services - University of Utah Health Care - Salt Lake City, Utah

Radiology Services

Preparing for Your Appointment

Flouroscopy:

MRI

CT

Ultrasound

Nuclear Medicine

Mammography

Interventional Rediology

OB Ultrasound

Fluoroscopy


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48 HOUR DIET RESTRICTION INSTRUCTIONS

Your physician is preparing you for an examination that requires thorough clearing of the intestinal tract.  Be sure to follow all instructions or the entire examination may have to be repeated.
Important:  A high fluid intake is essential to the success of this regimen.  You MUST drink lots of fluid.  Drink only black coffee, plain tea, clear fruit juice (no pulp), soft drinks, or water at the times indicated below NO MILK OR CREAM!!!

48 hours before examination or procedure:

*LOW RESIDUE foods only.  Example:  white bread, cream of wheat, meat (not fried), chicken, turkey, ham, and all defined liquids are allowed.  AVOID- raw fruits, raw vegetables, nuts, raisins, whole-wheat products, cold cuts, cheeses, hotdogs, and meat fats.

24 hours prior to examination:

LIQUIDS ONLY!!  This may include soup, bouillon with the fat skimmed off, plain gelatin and clear liquids.  NO SOLID FOODS PERMITTED.  Starting midnight the night before procedure, NPO (nothing by mouth) no water, gum chewing or cigarettes.  Prescription medications may be taken as scheduled with a small glass of water.

*Residue refers to the total amount of undigested materials that make up feces.  For example, milk does not contain fiber, but it adds to fecal residue.  The main source of residue is fiber in foods like whole-grain breads and cereals, seeds and nuts, dried fruits, and the stalks and skins of fruits and vegetables.

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BARIUM ENEMA OR GASTROGRAFFIN ENEMA (WATER SOL.)

Procedure:

A catheter is placed into the rectum and a radiopaque contrast is injected into the large bowel. This contrast shows the anatomy of the large bowel and any abnormalities. Typically, the patient may feel discomfort but no pain. The barium may stay in a patient’s system for as many as five days.

Duration:

With air contrast and without: 60 minutes
Gastrograffin: 45 minutes
Patients that have an iliostomy/colostomy: 30 minutes

Preparation:

Adults - Patient must pick up Lo So preparation kit and 48 hour diet instructions
Colostomy patients – No preparation

Pediatric patients:
0-2 years NPO 2-4 hours prior to exam. Check with nurse.
2-6 years ½ suppository at night and 1/2 suppository in morning, NPO at least 4 hours prior.
6-12 years ½ bottle magnesium citrate on dulclax tablet and one suppository, NPO after midnight
12-14 Use the preparation for the adults unless patient weighs less than 100 lbs. then use 6-12 hour preparation

Use the preparation for the adults unless patient weighs less than 100 lbs. then use 6-12 hour preparation

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BACLOFEN INJECTION

Procedure:
Duration:

30-60 minutes

Preparation:

None

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CYSTOGRAM

Procedure:

A urinary catheter is placed into the bladder through the urethra. A contrast is injected into the bladder and a series of films are taken. This exam is used to look for bladder abnormalities, reflux of urine into the ureters and neurogenic bladders.

Duration:

30-60 minutes

Preparation:

No preparation unless in conjunction with an IVP then the patient must use the lo so preparation kit and follow the 48 hour diet. When scheduling schedule the cystogram with the IVP to follow.

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FISTULAGRAM

Procedure:

A catheter is used to fill the sinus tract with a contrast medium. Determine the direction and depth of the sinus tract.

Duration:

30 minutes

Preparation:

None

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HYSEROSALPINGORAM (HSG)

Procedure:

Contrast is injected into the uterus and fallopian tubes to see any abnormalities or blockages of the fallopian tubes. The exam is performed by the patient’s OB/GYN doctor.

Duration:

30 minutes

Preparation:

None

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INTRAVENOUS PYELOGRAM (IVP)

Procedure:

A dye is injected into the patient’s veins which are filtered through the kidney while x-rays are taken to show function and any pathology of kidneys, ureters and bladder.

Duration:

60 minutes

Preparation:

Patients must have bun and creatinine level drawn within the last month if patient is over 60 or if they only have one kidney. Patient must speak to referring doctor is allergic to iodine. If patient is taking glucophage or metaformin, they are not to take these medications for 48 hours AFTER procedure.

Adults – Tridate preparation kit and 48 hour diet
Colostomy patients – Tridate preparation kit without suppository

PEDIATRIC (IVP)
0-2 Years NPO 2-4 hours prior to exam.
2-6 Years ½ suppository at night ½ suppository in the morning NPO at least four hours prior.
6-12 Years ½ bottle magnesium citrate, one duclax tablet  and one suppository - NPO after midnight.
12-14 Years  Use adult preparation unless weight is under 100 lbs then use 6-12 years old preparation.
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LUMBAR PUNCTURE

Procedure:

Lying down on stomach while a local anesthetic is administered around the site of the injection. A spinal needle is inserted by the radiologist. The needle is guided into the spinal column and fluid is drawn under fluoro guidance.

Duration:

30-60 minutes

Preparation:

Patient should plan on spending 2 hours in the hospital. Patient needs to be NPO and a driver to take them home and remain bed rest for the remainder of day. If patient is on blood thinners (Coumadin/Asprin), they need to be off of either for 5 days prior to exam. Labs also need to be done.

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SINOGRAM/FISTULAGRAM

Procedure:

Contrast is injected into the sinus tract.

Duration:
Preparation:

No preparation.

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SMALL BOWEL FOLLOW-THROUGH *ONLY *

Procedure:

Patient drinks barium and abdominal images are taken to follow the barium through the small intestines.

Duration:

1-3 hours

Preparation:

48 hour preparation (no preparation for ileostomy patients).

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SNIFF TEST

Procedure:
Duration:

30 minutes

Preparation:
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TRIGEMINAL NERVE INJECTION (GLYCEROL INJECTION)

Procedure:

Gylcerol solution is injected into the facial area surrounding the trigeminal nerve to stop the pain. Anesthesia will be given.

Duration:

90 minutes

Preparation:

Preparation is given by neurosurgery

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T TUBE CHOLANGIGRAM

Procedure:

A small amount of contrast is placed in a previously surgical placed tube. A series of x-rays are taken to see if there are any blockages or abnormal pathology. Usually done in the OR.

Duration:
Preparation:

No preparation is needed

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UGI, UGI WITH SBFT AND SBFT ONLY

Procedure:

A small amount of contrast is placed in a previously surgical placed tube. A series of x-rays are taken to see if there are any blockages or abnormal pathology. Usually done in the OR.

Duration:

30 minutes to 3 hours

Preparation:

Patient needs to follow 48 hour diet with restrictions for UGI with SBFT. Patient needs to be NPO after midnight for the UGI only, and SBFT only.

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VCUG (VOIDING CYSTOURETHROGRAM)

Procedure:

A urinary catheter is placed into the bladder via the urethra. A contrast is injected into the bladder and a series of films are taken. This exam is used to look for urinary abnormalities, reflux, or urine into the uteter and neurogenic bladders following the filling of the bladder. The patient is asked to void out the contrast. Images are taken while the patient voids.

Duration:

With or without a catheter: 30 minutes

Preparation:

No preparation is needed unless in combination with an IVP; then patient must use the Tridate preparation kit.

MRI


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Enteroclysis

Enteroclysis is an exam that is performed to look at the small and large intestine.  The patient drinks Volumen contrast which shows up really bright on the MRI scan.  This provides a good contrast in the MRI so that the borders of the bowel can be clearly seen.  This allows the Radiologist to see any problems such as fistulas in the bowel.  The patient will most likely receive IV contrast as well. 

Entroclysis is performed to:
  • Evaluate the small and large intestine
  • Examine the borders of the bowel and check for fistulas
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Examination Preparation:

  • NPO after MIDNIGHT
  • Arrive 1 hour early for Volumen
  • There will 3 bottles, 1 bottle will be drank every 20 min so all 3 are consumed with the hour

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Enteroclysis Volumen Instructions

  1. PT must be NPO (nothing to eat or drink) for 8 hours before MRI scan
  2. PT must begin drinking Volumen Barium Sulfate Suspension 1.5 hours before MRI scan
  3. A total of 3 bottles must be consumed (approximately 1 bottle every 20 minutes)
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Cardiac MRI

Cardiac MRI creates pictures of your heart as it is beating, producing both still and moving pictures of your heart and major blood vessels. Doctors use cardiac MRI to get pictures of the beating heart and to look at its structure and function. These pictures can help them decide how to treat people who have heart problems.
Cardiac MRI imaging is performed to help:

  • evaluate the anatomy and function of the heart, valves, major vessels, and surrounding structures (such as the surrounding pericardial sac).
  • diagnose and manage a variety of cardiovascular problems.
  • plan a patient's treatment for cardiovascular problems and monitor patient's progress.
Cardiac MRI preparation:

If you are going to be having a Stress Cardiac MRI we will ask you to not have anything that contains caffeine for 24 hours. This includes coffee, tea, chocolate, nicotine, energy drinks, and soda.

Patients can take their medication and eat normally. 

Patients need to be awake for Cardiac MRI’s because there are many points throughout the scan where the patient is required to hold their breath.

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Defograms 

A Defogram is an MRI procedure that is done to evaluate abnormalities such as urinary prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence.

Exam preparation:

Patient needs to not eat or drink anything from midnight the night before.

Paientt should arrive 45 minutes early; they will drink 250cc water upon arrival to fill bladder.

Once patient is in the MRI room they will inject ultrasound gel into their rectum and another gel into the vagina for females. 

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Defogram/Rectal Scan

  1. NPO after Midnight
  2. Arrive 1 hour early before scan
  3. Purchase and use home enema kit 2 hours before the scan (a second enema may be necessary for some patients)

*Enema kits may be purchased at any pharmacy or grocery store. Patients may contact their doctors for recommendations or questions about an enema.

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Neurogram/Brachial Plexus MRI

A Neurogram is a special MRI that focuses on the nerves.  Radiologists protocol these exams based on the nerves that should be visualized.  These exams may be done with or without contrast depending on the preference of the physician.

Neurograms are preformed to:
  • Evaluate the nerves in a very specific area to determine pathology depending on symptoms being experienced.
Neurogram Preperation:
  • There is no special prep for this exam.  If it is necessary, patients can receive sedation for this exam.

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Prostate

  1. Eat a light diet the day before your Prostate MRI exam.
  2. Arrive 30 minutes before the exam.
  3. Refrain from ejaculation 3 days before Prostate MRI exam.
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CT


IV Sedation – NPO after midnight or 8 hours

  • Bring driver

General Anesthesia – 1.5 hours early; check into admitting, NPO 8 hours

Iodine Allergies – 13-hour premedication preparation

  • Doctor prescription

Entroclysis – NPO after midnight

Biopsy/drain placements – NPO after midnight

Volumen Drinking Instructions

Nothing to eat or drink 1 hour prior to appt time or after you start drinking Volumen contrast
Shake the contrast well before drinking. It does not need to be refrigerated, but tastes better when cold.
Begin drinking the contrast 1 hour prior to your scheduled exam time. Drink first bottle in 20 min, drink second bottle in 20 min, and half of the third bottle in 20 min. Save the last half of the third bottle for visit to CT.

Instructions for taking Oral Contrast (Barium Sulfate)

Nothing to eat or drink 1 ½ hours prior to appt time or after you start drinking oral contrast.
Shake the contrast well before drinking. It does not need to be refrigerated, but tastes better when cold.
Begin drinking the contrast 1 ½ hours before your scheduled exam time. Drink one-third of a bottle every fifteen minutes. Save the last third and bring it with you to your appointment.

If you are taking the drug Glucophage (or something similar) for diabetes, please let the technologist know before you are scanned. If you are allergic to iodine or shellfish, or have had a reaction to CT dye in the past, please call as soon as possible to receive special instructions and medications.

Ultrasound


Abdominal Ultrasound – Fasting after midnight (only in morning)

Pelvic ultrasound – Full bladder, 32 oz fluid 1 hour prior to appt

Renal Ultrasound – Well hydrated

Paracentesis – Labs: Coagulation (PT, PTT, INR) & platelets within 2 weeks

Thoracentesis – Labs: Coagulation (PT, PTT, INR) & platelets within 2 weeks

Nuclear Medicine


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3 PHASE BONE SCAN

Procedure:

Patient is injected and scanned at arrival time and returns 3 hours later for an hour long scan.

Duration:

60 minutes

Preparation:

No preparation

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BEXXAR STUDY

Procedure and Duration:
  • Visit 1: Cold infusion in oncology ordered by requesting doctor 2 hours before low dose isotope in Nuclear Medicine accompanied by scan. (Roughly 5 hours)
  • Visit 2: Scan in Nuclear Medicine, 3 days after first visit. (Roughly 30 minutes)
  • Visit 3: Scan in Nuclear Medicine, 6 days after first visit. (Roughly 30 minutes)
  • Visit 4: Cold infusion in oncology ordered by the requesting doctor 2 hours before higher isotope therapy dose in Nuclear Medicine, 7-8 days after visit 3.
Preparation:

Patient picks up SSKI preparation from Doctor’s office to be taken 24 hours before visit 1 and up to 2 weeks after last visit.

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BONE SCAN FLOW

Procedure:

Exams are for extremity issues or for a particular place of interest such as hip, knee, arm or rib.

Duration:

Approximately 30 minute scan then return 3 hours later for another 60 minute scan.

Preparation:

No preparation.

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BONE SCAN INJECTION

Procedure and Duration:

Patient is injected with isotope and scanned for approximately 30 minutes and returns 3 hours later for another 60 minute scan.

Preparation:

No preparation

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BONE SCAN SPECT

Procedure and Duration:

Patient is injected with isotope and scanned for approximately 30 minutes and returns 3 hours later for another 60 minute scan.

Preparation:

No preparation

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BRAIN IMAGING

Procedure and Duration:

Patient has IV put  in and rests for 20 minutes in a quiet room. The tracer is injected and pictures are taken. If brain spect, the procedure takes two days. The first day is with Diamox for 2 hours and the second day without Diamox for an hour.

Preparation:

No preparation

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CISTERNOGRAM (CSF) - HYDROCEPHALUS

Procedure and Duration:

Patient arrives for both a lumbar puncture and isotope injection, followed by an immediate 5 min scan. 4-6 hour later, patient receives a scan that lasts one hour. The patient comes back in 24 hours after injection for another one-hour scan.

Preparation:

No preparation

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CISTERNOGRAM (CSF) - RHINORRHEA

Procedure and Duration:

Patient arrives and receives lumbar puncture and isotope inject. Patient is brought immediately to Nuclear Medicine for a 5 min scan. Pledgets (cotton rolls) are inserted into patients nostrils by ENT right after scan. Patient returns to Nuclear Medicine 4-6 hours later for 1 hour of imaging. Pledgets are then removed. Patient returns again to Nuclear Medicine for another 1 hour scan.

Preparation:

No preparation

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DMSA – RENAL SCAN

Procedure:

Patient is injected with isotope and comes back four hours later to be scanned.

Duration:

5 minutes

Preparation:

No preparation

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GASTRIC EMPTYING SCAN

Procedure:

Patient eats a bowl of beef stew and drinks a glass of orange juice with radioactive tracer. One minute images are taken every 30 minutes for two hours.

Duration:

Approximately 2 hours

Preparation:

NPO 6 hours

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GFR (KIDNEY TEST)

Procedure and Duration:

Patient is injected with isotope and comes in at scheduled time. Patient receives 2 minute scan and comes back one hour later for blood draw. Patient comes in 2 hours later for another blood draw.

Preparation:

No preparation

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HIDA SCAN

Procedure:

Patient is injected with isotope after arrival and put on camera. The patient is injected with CCK half way through test to help gallbladder work so it can be scanned.

Duration:

Approximately 2 hours

Preparation:

NPO six hours prior to appointment. No pain medications or narcotics of any kind six hours before procedure.

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H-PYLORI BREATH STUDY

Procedure:

Patient takes capsule then blows into a balloon 10 minutes later. The patient blows into the balloon again after five more minutes.

Duration:

Exam takes approximately 45 to 60 minutes (no camera time).

Preparation:

No food or liquids (not even water) for 6 hours. No antacids (Maalox, Tums, amphogeal, Rolaids, etc.), H2 blockers (Tagament, Zantac, Axid, Pepsid) for 24 hours. No proton pump inhibitors (Priolosec Prevacid) and sucralfate (Carafete) for 2 weeks. No antibiotics or Pepto Bismol (except sulfa drugs) for 1 month.

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LEUKOCYTE OR WHITE BLOOD CELL SCAN

Procedure and Duration:

Patient comes in for a blood draw. Patient comes back 4 hours later and blood is re-injected with tagged blood cells. 18-24 hours after re-injection, patient comes back for a 2 hour scan.

Preparation:

No preparation.

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LYMPHOSCINTIGRAPHY

Procedure:

Patient is injected four times around site of interest and then imaged to watch for draining.

Duration:

As little as 30 minutes to as long at one day depending on patient’s lymph node system.

Preparation:

No preparation. Scan usually takes place the day before surgery to remove lymph node.

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MECKEL’S DIVERTICULUM

Procedure and Duration:

Patient is injected with isotope. Patient is then scanned every 10 minutes for two hours.

Preparation:

NPO 6 hours

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MIBG

Procedure and Duration:

Patient is injected with isotope and comes back the next day for a 2 hour scan.

Preparation:

Patient is to be on SSKI drops for 2 days prior. Drops are prescribed by ordering physician.

Drugs

 

 

 

Mechanism of interference (known or expected)

Suggested withdrawal prior to MIBG scintigraphy

Opioids narcodics

Uptake inhibition

7-14

Tricyclic antidepressants: Amitriptyline and derivates: such as imipramine and derivates, amoxapine, loxapine, doxepine

Uptake of granules

7-14 days

Sympathicomimetics*: Phenylpropanolamine, pseudoephedrine, phenilephrine, amphetamine, dopamine, isoproterenol, salbutamol, terbutaline, phenoterol, xylometazoline

Depletion of granules

7-14 days

Antihypertensive/cardiovascular agents:

Amiodarone

Inhibition uptake and depletion

21 days

Beta agonists: such as labetalol, metoprolol, propranol, atenolol,

Inhibition uptake and depletion

21 days

Reserpine

Depletion and transport inhibition

14 days

Bretylium, guanethidine

Depletion and transport inhibition

14 days

Calcium channel blockers: nifedpidine, nicardipine, amlodipine

Increased uptake and retention

14 days

ACE inhibitors: captopril, enalapril, etc.

Increased uptake and retention

14 days

Antipsychotics:

Phenothiazines (chlorpromiazine, promethazine, fluphenazine, others)

Uptake inhibition

21-28 days

Thioxanthenes (maprotiline, trazolone)

Uptake inhibition

21-28 days

Butyrophenones (droperidol, haloperidol)

Uptake inhibition

21-28 days

Alpha agonists: Alpha agonists

Phentolamine, tolazoline, phenoxybenzamine, yohimbine

Uptake inhibition

3 days

Prazosin

Uptake inhibition

1 day


  • The above medications interfere with uptake of MIBG and should be stopped, if possible. If there is a question about specific drugs, call (801) 581-2370 (Nuclear Medicine, University of Utah Hospital).
  • All patients should receive SSKI or Lugol’s solution (one drop in juice or water three times per day) beginning two days before and continuing for six days after I-131 MIBG administration. This prescription should be given by the referring physician.
  • Patients should plan on being available for 3 successive days, if necessary (day of injection, and following two days). There is no restriction on eating or drinking for any of the appointments, and good hydration is encouraged.
  • The patient is strongly encouraged to bring the actual images for any relevant correlative imaging studies that have been done, particularly CT or MRI of the neck, chest, abdomen or pelvis.
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MUGA

Procedure:

Patient arrives for isotope injection. Blood is drawn and waits for 30 minutes while radiation tracer kit is made. The blood is injected with the tracer and the patient is scanned for approximately 30 minutes.

Duration:

Approximately 1.5 hours

Preparation:

No preparation

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OCTREOTIDES

Procedure and Duration:
  • Day 1: Patient is injected and four hours later is scanned  for 30 minutes.
  • Day 2: 24 hours from initial injection, scanned for two hours.
  • Day 3: If need, another one to one and a half hour scan.
Duration:

2-3 Days

Preparation:

No preparation for first day. Bowel Prep Kit for the second day.

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PROSTACINT STUDY

Procedure and Duration:
  • Visit 1: Patient is injected with isotope.
  • Visit 2: Four days later, the patient is scanned (2-3 hours)
Preparation:

Bowel prep kit given by technologist on day one to prepare for day two 

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PARATHYROIDS

Procedure:

Patient is injected with isotope and scanned.

Duration:

Approximately 5 hours

Preparation:

No preparation

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RENAL SCAN

Procedure:

Patient is injected with isotope and scanned.

Duration:

Approximately 1 Hour

Preparation:

Patient is to drink a lot of water.

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SENTINEL LYMPH NODE

Procedure:

Patient is injected with isotope in breast of interest by ordering physician.

Preparation:

No preparation

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STRESS TEST

Procedure:

Patient is injected with isotope and waits 45-60 minutes. Patient is scanned for 20 minutes and then participates in designated stress test in Cardiology. A second isotope is injected during stress before waiting another 45-60 minutes. Patient comes back to Nuclear Medicine and scanned for another 20 minutes.

Duration:

Approximately 2.5 hours

Preparation:

NPO six hours. No caffeine for six hours (including chocolate, de-caffeinated drinks or medications such as Aspirin). Additionally no beta blockers for treadmills and dobutamines for 24 hours preceding procedure.

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THYROID SCANS

Call to discuss.

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VIABILITY WITH STRESS

Procedure and Duration:

An IV is placed. Patient goes to Cardiology for a stress test. Once complete, the patient comes back to Nuclear Medicine and scanned immediately, then four hours later, and 24 hours later.

Preparation:

NPO six hours. No caffeine for six hours (including chocolate, de-caffeinated drinks or medications such as Aspirin). Additionally no beta blockers for treadmills and dobutamines for 24 hours preceding procedure.

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VIABILITY WITHOUT STRESS

Procedure and Duration:

Patient is injected and imaged immediately and again four hours later.

Preparation:

No preparation.

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VQ

Procedure:

Patient lies down on scan table and breathes in scanning substance, Xennon. Patient breathes in for roughly one minute and is scanned.

Duration:

Approximately 1.5 hours.

Preparation:

Patient is to get a 2 view chest x-ray 24 hours before their VQ scan

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Mammography


Procedure:

Mammography 

Duration:

Screening Appointment: 30-40 minutes
Diagnostic Appointment: 60+ minutes

Preparation:

Do not apply any deodorant, lotion, or powder to the breasts or underarms the day of your appointment. Tell your health care provider before the mammogram if you have had any type of breast surgery such as a lumpectomy, mastectomy, or breast implants.

Interventional Radiology


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Instructions for Preparation for G Tube Placement

  • Date for procedure___________________________
  • Drink the contrast between 6:00 p.m. and midnight the evening prior to your procedure.  The contrast usually tastes better if it is chilled.
  • Please arrive at your scheduled check in time.______.  This time is about 2 hours before the actual procedure time to allow for preparations such as starting an IV and instruction.  It also allows for flexibility to start sooner if other cases finish ahead of time.
  • Eat light foods the day before the procedure. Do not eat any solid food 7 hours before the procedure time (no solids after_____________)
  • You may have clear liquids up to four hours before the procedure.  Clear liquids are anything you can see through such as apple juice, cranberry juice, broth, water—no orange juice, no milk.  (nothing to drink after ____________)

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Patient Information for Implanted Ports

Your doctor has recommended an implanted port for you.  Following is a brief description of a port and the answers to frequently asked questions about ports.

Your doctor has recommended a port placement which will allow medications to be given directly into your blood stream. A port is a small device with a hollow space inside that is sealed by a soft top.  The port is connected to a small flexible tube called a catheter.  The port is implanted completely beneath your skin and the catheter is inserted inside a blood vessel. The port acts like an IV to the bloodstream.  A special needle inserted just below the surface of your skin and into the port will allow medications and fluids to be given and blood withdrawn.  The port is made from special medical grade materials designed for safe long-term use in the human body.

Ports are often placed on the upper chest but may also be placed in other locations if needed.  The port will be visible as merely as a small raised area beneath your skin.  Daily care is generally not required and it does not normally affect your normal activities.

Care of Your Port

During the first few days after receiving the port, it will be important to avoid any heavy exertion. Keep the port incision covered with a clean and dry bandage.  Steri -strips are to be left in place until the incision is well healed, usually 10-14  days.  Any visible sutures will be removed in IR at a 2 week suture removal appointment. 

Change the dressing over the sutures every three days or more often if soiled or wet.
Cover your dressing when showering with a heavy duty type baggie taped over the dressing. If the dressing becomes moist or damp in the shower change it immediately.  Once the sutures and the steri- strips are removed, no special care of the skin site is needed.  Report any redness, unexplained fever or signs of infection at the port site promptly to your physician or call Interventional Radiology at the numbers provided.

Prior to each use the skin will be cleansed and prepped by your nurse.

After each use of your Port, it must be flushed with saline and a special solution to keep the port patent and in good working order.  If the port is not used often it must be flushed and treated monthly.  This will most likely be arranged by your physician and you will be instructed prior to your discharge how this will be arranged.  If you are confused on this issue please call us at the number below.

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Flushing and Recording of Input and Outputs For Drains From Interventional Radiology 

The practice of flushing drainage catheters is important to maintain their patency and effectiveness.  The documentation of flushing and the accurate recording of I&O’s helps the IR staff in evaluating the effectiveness of the drain.  The ability to determine the actual output minus the flush helps to determine whether the drain can safely be removed or another imaging study is needed.  It is therefore, important that accurate I&O’s of the drains be recorded.

  1. Please record the outputs of drains in an appropriately labeled output column on the flow sheet each time the drain is emptied.
  2. Document the amount of flush in parenthesis in the appropriate output column on the flow sheet.  (This will ensure the IR staff that flushing of the drain is being done.)
  3. Subtract the amount of flush and record a net amount of output each shift
  4. Please include a 24 hr total – of net output from the drains.  If some or all of the flush is retained by the patient, the net output will be a negative number-please record it as such.  If the output equals the amount of flush put into the drain the net output will be zero-please record a zero rather than leaving the column blank.
Flushing of Drainage Catheters
  1. Turn the 3way stopcock off to the drainage bag. 
  2. Clean the infusion port on the stopcock with an alcohol wipe and connect the flush syringe containing the appropriate amount of flush. 
  3. Gently inject the flush into the drain- towards the patient. 
  4. Turn the stopcock off to the infusion port- this will open the valve to allow drainage into the bag.  Disconnect the flush syringe. 
  5. Do Not Aspirate Drains without an order.
Cleaning of Drainage Site

Drain site dressings should be changed every two to three days as well as any time the dressing becomes soiled or wet. The day shift then can report to the IR staff any problems at the site allowing a more expedient intervention if needed.  Careful cleaning and site assessment should be done with every dressing change.  Clean the site with Sterile Saline if the site has crusted debris you may use 1/2 Hydrogen Peroxide and 1/2   sterile saline to help clean the site– use a gauze pad, cotton ball, or cotton swab as needed.

Dry the area and place a new gauze pad and a non-occlusive dressing over the drain site.  Document any signs of infection – redness, purulent drainage or red streaks extending from the drain site, and report them to IR or the attending physician.  Also, report any drainage leaking around the drain to IR.

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Patient Discharge Instruction For Uterine Fibroid Embolization

In order to ensure a rapid and worry-free recovery from your procedure, we have put together this set of instructions to answer the most common questions that patients have.  As always, we are happy to answer any questions! Please see the sections below for answers to many frequenstly asked questions.

Over the next several days you are likely to have cramps that come and go as well as feeling as if you have the flu, with low energy, intermittent nausea, and possibly fever.  These are all normal side effects of the procedure as your body reacts to the death of the fibroid tissue.   Usually these symptoms are most pronounced the the first 2 or 3 days and by the fourth or fifth day after the procedure you will start to feel better.  It is unusual for these symptoms to last longer than 7 days.  The cramps may continue for a few days longer.  Because of the flu-like symptoms, most patients will need about 1 week off from work.  While you will progressively feel better over several days, you should anticipate a generalized lack of energy and should gauge your activity accordingly.  We do not recommend travel plans for two weeks and would not advise overseas travel for 1 month or until you feel completely recovered.  With this overview, we discuss specific problems below.

Follow-up Care

We will call you the day after your discharge to check your progress and to answer any questions.  At this time, we will schedule a follow-up visit the following week.  We will call you in 30 days after the procedure to be sure that there have not been any problems.   At 3 months post-procedure ,  we will send you a brief questionnaire and a prescription for an MRI.  We would encourage you to have a brief follow-up visit at that time to review the films and your symptom status.  You should continue your normal gynecologic well-woman care with your gynecologist.  This includes monthly self-breast exams and yearly pelvic exams with Pap smear as suggested by your gynecologist.

Puncture Sites

Arterial punctures were performed at the top of the leg and Band-Aids or a clear tegaderm dressing are in place over the puncture site.  You may shower in 24 hours, but we ask you not to bathe in a tub for 5 – 7 days until the puncture site is well sealed.  For the next two days replace the Band-aid  with a dry, clean Band-Aid after your shower.  This will promote healing.  If you notice any swelling or active bleeding form the puncture site, you should use direct pressure by placing your fingers and a clean cloth or paper towel over the site,  Immediately call for assistance and report to the nearest emergency room for evaluation.  Post-procedure bleeding is extremely rare after discharge, but we want you to be aware of what to do should this occur. 

There may be some bruising at the puncture site and this is normal.  This bruising may spread out over several days.  This is the normal way in which a small amount of blood under the skin is reabsorbed.  This should not be of concern.   You may notice a small knot under the skin at the puncture site, usually about the size of a large pea.   This too is part of the healing process and will usually fade away within a few months.

Infrequently, patients will notice continuing pain at the puncture site or in the upper thigh.  This is usually due to irritation of the nerve branch that passes by the puncture site.  If this is bothersome, you may continue to take Motrin of Advil, which will usually reduce the discomfort.  While it is possible for this discomfort to continue for several weeks or longer, this is very rare.  Should this occur, please contact us.

Diet and Activity

Resume your normal diet and medications.  You should slowly increase your activity over the next three to four days.  You may have unrestricted activity, including sexual activity and exercise, 7 days after the procedure.  Do not drive until you are no longer taking the prescription pain medications (Percocet or Dilaudid).  These medications may make you sleepy.  Because of this, do not operate any machinery or kitchen appliances while you are taking them. 

Medications

You have been given a number of  prescriptions to help manage pain and nausea that may occur in the first several days post-procedure.   For convenience, we have provided the following table of the generic and trade names of the prescription drugs we usually use.

Action Generic Name Brand Name
Anti-inflammatory Ibuprofen Motrin
Pain relief Oxycodone Percocet
Pain relief-severe Hydromorphone Dilaudid
Anti-nausea Ondansetron HCL Zofran
Anti-nausea Promethazine Phenergan
Post-Procedure Pelvic Pain and / or Cramps

You should expect to have pelvic pain and cramping over the next several days to two weeks.  Usually this lasts for 3 to 4 days.  It is most intense the day after the procedure and decreases each day thereafter.  You have been given Motrin (Ibuprofen), which is an anti-inflammatory medication.   You will take 800mg every 6 hours for 4 days.  In addition, you have been given narcotic pain medications to assist with pain control.  Percocet (Oxycodone) is a narcotic pain reliever and generally provides substantial relief for most patients.  You may take one or two tablets every 4 hours as needed for pain.  You have also been given a stronger narcotic pain reliever called Dilauded (Hydodrmorohone).  If you do not receive any relief from the Percocet, you may use Dilaudid instead of the Percocet.  Take the Dilaudid, one tablet every 4 hours as needed for pain.

Nausea

It is not unusual to experience nausea after the procedure.  You have been given a prescription for an anti-nausea medication.  This is either Phenergan (Promethazine) or Zofran (Ondansetron Hydrochloride).  You may take this medication according to the label directions every 4 to 6 hours as needed for nausea.  If the medication you have been given does not relieve the nausea, call us and we can prescribe an alternate medication.

Heartburn and Constipation

While taking the Motrin it is important to protect your stomach from irritation.  Try and eat some food before taking the medication and take it with a full glass of water.   It is best to remain in an upright sitting position for at least 30 minutes after taking the Motrin.  A common side effect of the prescription pain medicine is constipation.  Feel free to use Milk of Magnesia or a warm glass of prune juice prior to drinking your morning coffee or eating breakfast.  Also, remember to drink at least 8 glasses of water a day.  We have included a prescription for colace a stool softner for you to take daily for while you are taking pain medication.

Fever

A mildly elevated temperature is a common side effect of the Uterine  Fibroid Embolization and occurs in approximately 20-25% of patients.  The fever is a side effect of the fibroids dying and does not indicate infection in most cases.  This should be treated with regular Tylenol.  You may take 2 tablets every 4 hours while the fever is present.  Motrin will also relieve fever.  High temperatures (greater than 102), a fever that persists for more than 3 days, or a fever that arises more than a week after the procedure might indicate infection and you should call the Interventional Radiology Department as described at the bottom of this instruction set.  In general, infections that might develop would be much more likely to develop in a week to several weeks after the procedure.

Menstrual Periods, Vaginal Discharge or Spotting

A brown or reddish brown vaginal discharge or spotting after the embolization is considered normal and may continue for a few weeks or until your first period.  You may use a sanitary napkin until it resolves.  We would prefer you not use a tampon for the first week after the procedure.  Occasionally,  patients will have a clear watery discharge for several weeks or months after the procedure.  This does not indicate infection.  Of greater concern is a thick or foul smelling discharge, particularly if it is accompanied by fever or pelvic pain.  This may indicate an infection and you need to contact us. 

On occasion, the procedure causes you to start a menstrual cycle early or you may skip a period or two.  If heavy bleeding was one of the symptoms caused by your fibroids, often your periods will be better right away.   However, some patients will not improve for 2 or 3 cycles; so don’t be discouraged if there is no immediate improvement.  Regardless of whether bleeding or pressure and pain were symptoms, most patients will have improvement by the 3rd month after the procedure.  The first and possibly the second menstrual periods may be more uncomfortable than usual.  Some patients tend to have increased cramps during these periods.  This should resolve as the fibroids shrink.  The fibroids take several months to significantly shrink and may continue shrinking for up to a year.  Therefore,short-term improvement in the size of the uterus should not be expected.

Hormonal Changes

Some of the patients may experience symptoms as a result of changes in their hormonal balance after the procedure.  Fibroids are estrogen driven.  As the fibroids die, there may be a sudden change in hormones.  Some women may experience mild depression, which usually subsides in a few days.  Others experience “hot flashes” and/or night sweats that may persist for a few weeks.  These symptoms are generally self-limiting and resolve without treatment.

Signs of Potential Problems

Symptoms that might indicate problems include swelling or active bleeding from the puncture site, pain that arises several days or weeks after the initial pain has resolved, a temperature  several days to weeks after the initial procedure or an abnormal vaginal discharge (particularly if foul smelling or copious).  This might indicate either an infection or partial passage of a portion of the fibroid and may require gynecologic evaluation.  If any of these symptoms occur, please contact the Interventional Radiology Department clinical coordinator to assess the symptoms and recommend further treatment recommendations.

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Patient Discharge Instructions for Drain Care

You have had a drain placed in an abscess, which you will need to care for until it is removed.  This will include daily flushing the tube as well as cleaning the tube site and changing the dressing.  You may need to keep an external drain for several weeks until your abscess has resolved, so it will be important for you to understand how to properly care for the drain.  

You will flush the drain with ____ of sterile saline daily as instructed.  Flushing the drain will keep the tube functioning properly.

After flushing, empty the drainage bag and record the output.  Please let us know when the drainage slows down to less then 10 cc per day for several days.  It will then be time for us to evaluate the abscess in Interventional Radiology.      

To flush the drain:
  1. Turn the 3 way stopcock off to the drainage bag.
  2. Clean the flushing port with alcohol and attach the flush syringe.
  3. Gently inject the flush.
  4. Turn the stopcock off to the flushing port and open to the bag.

It will also be important to change the dressing and clean around the tube daily.  Remove the dressing and clean around the tube with sterile saline using a cotton ball or Q tip. If there is a crusty discharge around the tube you may clean it with a little hydrogen peroxide.  Place a clean gauze pad over the tube site and secure it with tape.  If the tube site becomes red, irritated or you notice excessive drainage around the tube, please contact the nurse from Interventional Radiology or your doctor.

Please record the daily output of your drain and subtract the saline flush from the output.  When the net output drops to less than 10cc per day for several days it will be time to reassess the drain.

Please call the nurse from Interventional Radiology or your doctor to arrange the drain removal.  If you have questions regarding your drain, please do not hesitate to call.

Daily Reminders of Drain care.
  1. Flush drain daily as instructed.
  2. Decompress the Suction and Empty the drainage bag.
  3. Daily record the Net Output on a log sheet.  Please remember to subtract out the flush before recording the Net Output.
  4. Change the drain site dressing daily.
To Decompress the Suction drain-
  1. Turn the stopcock off to the drain.  ( Turn the valve up Off to the drain and the body.)
  2. Open the stopcock to air by unscrewing the flushing port- The accordion suction will expand when properly decompressed.
  3. Replace the flushing port.   Firmly compress the accordion suction by placing your thumbs on top and fingers behind the accordion bulb and Squeeze the accordion bulb.  You will need to repeat this 1-2 times to empty the suction bulb well.
  4. Turn the valve off to the flushing port.  This will open the Drain to suction drainage.

Note: The accordion suction must be compressed and the stop cock turned off to the flushing port for the drain to function.

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Patient Instructions for Percutaneous Nephrostomy Tube Care

You have had a drain placed in your kidney, which you will need to care for until it is removed.  This will include daily flushing the tube as well as cleaning the tube site and changing the dressing.  You may need to keep an external drain for an extended period of time, so it will be important for you to understand how to properly care for the drain.  This tube will need to be changed out every three months. An appointment will be set up through the Interventional Radiology Department at (801) 581-2967.

You will flush the drain with 5-10cc of sterile saline daily as instructed.  Flushing the drain will help keep the tube functioning properly.

To flush the drain:
  1. Turn the 3 way stopcock off to the drainage bag.
  2. Clean the flushing port with alcohol and attach the flush syringe.
  3. Gently inject the flush.
  4. Turn the stopcock off to the flushing port and open to the bag.                 

It will also be important to change the dressing and clean around the tube every 2-3 days.  You may shower with the drain, but you must change the dressing immediately after showering to keep the dressing clean and dry.  At any time the dressing becomes wet or soiled, you will need to change it.  Remove the dressing and clean around the tube with sterile saline using a cotton ball or Q tip.  If there is any crusty drainage around the tube you may clean it with a small amount of hydrogen peroxide.   A mixture of ½ hydrogen peroxide and saline or water is recommended.  Dry the site after cleaning.  Place a clean gauze pad over the tube site and secure it with tape.  If the tube site becomes red, irritated or you notice drainage around the tube, please contact the nurse from Interventional Radiology or your doctor.

When to call the Doctor or the Interventional Radiology Service.
  1. Fever of 101 F or greater, and or shaking chills.
  2. Leakage of drainage or urine around the tube site.
  3. If the skin around the tube is red, irritated or a foul discharge is noted.
  4. If you have nausea or vomiting.
  5. If you develop unusual pain around the tube or unexplained flank or back pain.
    If your tube has been capped, uncap the tube and connect to the drainage bag.
  6. If your tube pulls back or falls out.
  7. Difficulty flushing the tube.
  8. Tube not draining when connected to the drainage bag.
  9. Foul smelling urine.

You can contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967or 801-581-8170 during the day Monday through Friday.  For urgent after hour needs, you will need to call the Hospital paging operator at 581-2121.  An operator will take your number and a physician will return your call.

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Patient Post Chemoembolization Instructions

You have just had an angiogram and chemoembolization procedure of you liver tumor.   During your procedure and stay in the hospital you have received medication to relieve pain and nausea.  You will continue medication  to control your discomfort and nausea at home as needed.

It is normal after Liver Chemoembolization:
  1. To have a low-grade temperature  ( < 102 F ) for one week
  2. To experience nausea and or vomiting, lethargy, and decreased appetite for
    several days.
  3. To have bruising at the groin puncture site.
  4. To experience some hair loss.  This is usually minimal and may be unnoticed by others.

Symptoms usually last 5-7 days and may be more severe in some patients then in others.  We have prescribed several medications in order to address these symptoms.

Discharge Instructions:
  1. Take your medications as directed on the pharmacy label.
  2. Do not drink alcohol while taking the pain medication.
Diet:
  1. Drink at least 8 glasses of fluid per day.
  2. Eat a regular balanced diet.  Increasing fluids and fiber in your diet will help decrease  the chance of constipation.  Getting up and increasing your walking activity as tolerated  will also be helpful in this regard.
You should call the office if any of the following occur:
  1. Persistent nausea and vomiting unrelieved by medication.
  2. Fever greater than 102.0 F or fever associated with sweating and chills.
  3. Severe abdominal pain out of proportion to the pain you had been experiencing or pain unrelieved by pain medication.
  4. You become yellow ( eyes, face )  or your urine turns dark brown.
  5. You become confused or lose your sense of balance.
  6. You are having trouble with constipation that is not being relieved with medication.
You should:
  1. Resume light activity as soon as you feel up to it ( usually within a couple of days).
  2. Obtain laboratory tests and MRI  in 3- 4 weeks as directed.  Your appointment will be set up through the IR Coordinator.
  3. You should continue care and follow up with your Primary Care MD and Oncologist  as they direct.
  4. You may call IR Coordinator @ 581-2967 to contact the Interventional Radiologist for any concerns regarding your procedure, recovery or follow up care.           
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University of Utah Hospital Interventional Radiology Patient Post Procedure EVLT Instructions 

  1. Surgical compression stockings have been placed on your treated leg following your procedure today.   These are to remain in place until your follow up visit on ______________.   Should you have problems, discomfort or feel numbness in your foot or toes, please contact our office immediately. You will be encouraged to wear your compression stockings for 10-14 days following your procedure.  Compliance in wearing your stockings will reduce bruising, swelling and pain in your treated leg.
  2. You will be expected to walk immediately after your procedure for at least 20 minutes before leaving the hospital.  Walk as much as possible for the next several days during your waking hours. Walk more than normal during the next 2 weeks of your recovery.  If you need to be sitting at work or are in a car for extended periods of time over the next week, make frequent stops and  get up and walk for at least 10 minutes every hour.  Normal activity can be resumed immediately, but strenuous exercise can cause the vein to reopen, so please avoid hot baths and vigorous activity such as gym workouts or heavy lifting until at least 7 days following the procedure.
  3. Drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.
  4. Recovery from EVLT is usually trouble-free.  It is normal to feel a “tightening” sensation in your leg after a couple of days, and it may last for a few days.  Your thigh may also be slightly tender to the touch for a few days.  This discomfort can generally be managed with over-the-counter analgesics like Tylenol or Motrin, but please avoid aspirin-based products unless otherwise recommended or prescribed.
  5. As with any invasive procedures, problems can develop.  If you develop an acute fever (more than 100 F) or severe or worsening pain/swelling, please call our office immediately.
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Patient Instructions for Gastrostomy Tube Care

  • Do Not Use your gastrostomy tube (g-tube) for 24hours after tube placement.
  • Do Not Eat or Drink anything for 24 hours after tube placement. However, your doctor may order ice chips.
  • Do  Not Shower or take tub baths for 48 hours
  • Flush your g-tube with 50 mls of water after 24 hours.  Your nurse will show you and your family before you go home.  Do this twice a day.  If you use your g-tube for feedings or for medications, always follow with 50 mls of water to flush.
  • Crush all medications that you put through your g-tube.  Mix them well with water and flush the tube well after use.
  • Your doctor_______________________ should be arranging follow up home care for your g-tube if outside assistance is needed.    Please call their office.
Gastrostomy Tube Site Care
  1. Expect blood-tinged drainage for the first 24 hours.
  2. Avoid heavy lifting or adjusting the external disk for the first few days except to gently clean the area. 
  3. Change the dressing around your g-tube daily and anytime the dressing becomes soiled or wet.   Keep the site loosely covered until the sutures are removed.
  4. Unless the site continues to have drainage or leaks from around the tube, leave the site open to air after the sutures are removed.   If gauze pads are needed to absorb drainage, do not put more than one pad under the external retaining device and change frequently to keep the area dry.  Contact the IR coordinator if the site continues to leak or your skin becomes irritated after the sutures are removed.
  5. Clean around the G tube with half strength peroxide and saline daily with a cotton ball or cotton-tipped applicators to remove any drainage or crusting debris.  Keep the site clean and dry until the sutures are removed.  You may shower if you cover the site with plastic and avoid the shower spray on the site itself.   After your sutures are removed you may wash in the shower without a dressing.  Use soap and water around  the site and be sure to rinse thoroughly.   If you find soap irritating you may wash the site using a clean cloth and warm water only.
  6. A light coating of petroleum jelly or A&D ointment may prevent the small amount of normal drainage from drying on the skin so it is easier to remove as needed.
  7. Avoid alcohol, as it will remove protective skin oils.
  8. Avoid tension of the feeding tube.
  9. Do not lie on your left side after tube feedings to reduce the likelihood of leakage from the stoma.
  10. Gently rotate the gastrostomy tube 360 degrees daily after the sutures are removed.  In and out play of about one-fourth inch is expected.  The retainer should not be pressing tightly against the abdominal wall. 

Call Interventional Radiology if you experience difficulty flushing your G-tube, bubbling around the insertion site, redness and swelling, bleeding or any other problems that is of concern to you.  Please contact us as soon as possible if your tube becomes dislodged or is pulled out.  Replacing the tube as soon as possible will keep the original tract useable.

The Clinical Coordinator for Interventional Radiology will be available by phone or pager if you have questions or concerns

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Patient Discharge Instructions Hepatic Drain Care

You have had a drain placed in your liver, which you will need to care for until it is removed.  This will include daily flushing the tube as well as cleaning the tube site and changing the dressing.  You will need to keep the tube for at least 2 weeks to allow your body to heal before the tube is removed.  We will set up a tube check when the drainage begins to slow down. 

You will need to flush the drain daily with 10cc of sterile saline.  Flushing the drain will keep the tube functioning properly, allowing the abscess to drain and help you to heal.

After flushing, empty the drainage bag and record the output.  Please subtract the daily flush from the output before recording.  Bring this daily record to every doctor visit so that the drain can be evaluated.

To flush the drain:
  1. Turn the 3 way stopcock off to the drainage bag.
  2. Clean the flushing port with alcohol and attach the flush syringe.
  3. Gently inject the flush.
  4. Turn the stopcock off to the flushing port and open to the bag.
    It will also be important to change the dressing and clean around the tube.  You will change the dressing every three days or more often if it becomes wet or soiled.  Keep the dressing clean and dry. Remove the dressing and clean around the tube with sterile saline using a cotton ball or Q tip.  Place a clean gauze pad over the tube site and secure it with tape.  If the tube site becomes red, irritated or you notice a foul or off colored drainage around the tube, please contact the nurse from interventional radiology or your doctor.  Do not submerge the drain in water. Showering with the drain is permissible if you shield the drain from water.  Cover it with a heavy zip lock bag and tape the top of the bag along the skin above the drain. Change your dressing after your shower to keep the dressing dry.

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling (801) 581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Patient Instructions for Biliary Drain Care

You have had a drain placed in your biliary system, which you will need to care for until it is removed.  This will include daily flushing the tube as well as cleaning the tube site and changing the dressing.  You may need to keep an external drain for an extended period of time (typically 4-6 wks), so it will be important for you to understand how to properly care for the drain.  This tube will need to exchanged every 3 months.  An appointment will be set up through the Interventional Radiology department at 801-581-2967.

You will flush the drain with 5-10cc of sterile saline daily as instructed.  Flushing the drain will keep the tube functioning properly.  After flushing, empty the drainage bag and record the output.

To flush the drain:
  1. Turn the 3 way stopcock off to the drainage bag.
  2. Clean the flushing port with alcohol and attach the flush syringe.
  3. Gently inject the flush.
  4. Turn the stopcock off to the flushing port and  open to the bag.
    It will also be important to change the dressing and clean around the tube daily.  Remove the dressing and clean around the tube with sterile saline using a cotton ball or Q tip.  Place a clean gauze pad over the tube site and secure it with tape.  If the tube site becomes red, irritated or you notice drainage around the tube, please contact the nurse from interventional radiology or your doctor.
Please let us know if the drainage: both of these situations should be evaluated by a physician.   
  1. the output from your drain suddenly stops
  2. the output is more than 500 ml. per day  

PLEASE NOTE- It is very important to replace your daily biliary output with extra oral fluids. Gatorade or flavored Pedialyte are good fluid replacements as they contain some of the electrolytes you may lose in biliary fluid.  For example if you measure 350cc of biliary output you should drink an additional 350cc of Gatorade on top of what you might normally drink that day.  Again note if your daily output exceeds 500cc please notify us in Interventional Radiology.   

When to Call the Doctor or the IR service:
  1. If tube does not flush.  Or the flush comes out around the tube site when flushing the tube.      
  2. If bile or blood is leaking around the tube site.
  3. If the skin around the tube is red, irritated or a foul discharge is noted.
  4. If you have chills and or a fever over 101 F.  If these symptoms occur and your tube has been capped, uncap your tube and connect it to the drainage bag.
  5. If you have nausea/vomiting, or develop unusual pain around the tube or unexplained abdominal pain.  If tube is capped, uncap and connect to the drainage bag.

You can contact Interventional Radiology by calling 581-2967 during the day.   For urgent after hour needs, you will need to call the Hospital paging operator at 581-2121.   An operator will take your number and a physician will return your call.

Daily Reminders of Drain care:
  1. Flush drain daily as instructed with 5-10 ml of saline flush.
  2. Daily record the Net Output on a log sheet
    Call Interventional Radiology if the output exceeds 500 ml.
    Replace the output with an equal amount of Gatorade as instructed.
  3. Change the drain site dressing every two or three days.  Keep the dressing clean and dry.
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Interventional Radiology University of Utah Patient Information for Endovascular Laser Procedures

Before your Procedure:
  1. Do not drink alcoholic beverages and do not smoke for 2 days prior and 2 days after your procedure, since this may impair the healing process.
  2. The day of your procedure, shower and wash your legs thoroughly.  Do not apply any cream or lotion to your legs.
  3. To avoid discomfort, do not shave your legs the day of your appointment.
  4. Bring loose-fitting slacks or shorts to wear home after your treatment.
  5. Bring your elastic stockings for your treatment.
  6. Be on time.  A vein mapping will need to be done prior to your procedure.
  7. You will need a driver home as sedation will be given.  Please observe your fasting instructions.  You will need to fast from food 6-8 hrs prior to your procedure. However, you may drink clear liquids only (no coffee) up to 4 hours prior to your procedure.
After your Procedure:
  1. Immediately after the procedure, you will need to wear your elastic stocking 24 hours a day for the first 3 days.  Within the first several days we will expect to see you in clinic for a quick ultrasound of the treatment area. After your initial visit, you may remove the stockings at night only.  You will continue to wear them during the day for the next 7 – 10 days.  We can not overemphasize your compliance in wearing the stockings as prescribed, as it will help ensure a better treatment outcome for you.
  2. You will be able to maintain normal activities.  Walk as much as you can the first 3 days of your procedure.  Walk at least 10-15 minutes every hour during the day, the more the better. Walking daily is encouraged and promotes more rapid healing.  Avoid standing for long periods of time.  No aerobics, heavy lifting, bicycling, running or strenuous physical exercise for two weeks following your procedure or until your treatment program is completed.
  3. Avoid hot showers or baths during your treatment and recovery period as this may encourage the veins in your leg to dilate.  We are compressing the treated leg by having you wear the compression stockings to promote venous emptying as the blood is being redirected.   Dilation of these veins would be counter to our treatment goal at this time.
  4. We expect to see you in a brief clinic appointment 3 days after your procedure; you will have a quick ultrasound at that time to assess the progress of your treatment.  We will also see you again in 2 weeks to evaluate treatment and will at that time determine if further treatment will be necessary.
  5. Post Procedure instructions will be discussed and given to you following your procedure.  Compliance with these instructions will help to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes for you.  It is our intention to give you the best possible care throughout your treatment.  

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

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Interventional Radiology University of Utah/ Huntsman Cancer Hospital Patient Instructions for Procedures

Before your Procedure:
  1. Do not drink alcoholic beverages and do not smoke for 2 days prior and 2 days after your procedure, since this may impair the healing process.
  2. MEDICATIONS:   Please review the list of medicines and compare with those that your take regularly. It is important to compare any and all medicines with the approved list.  You should stop taking Ibuprofen and Aspirin five (5) days before your scheduled procedure.   If you take blood thinners, please discuss how to manage these medicines with the IR staff for specific instructions. The day of your procedure, you may take your regular medicines with a small sip of water.
  3. DIABETES:   If you take diabetic medicines, You will hold METFORMIN  the day of your procedure as well as the NEXT TWO DAYS.
  4. Bring loose-fitting CLOTHING to wear home after your treatment.
  5. You will need to have LABORATORY TESTS done within two weeks of your scheduled procedure.  If needed, arrangements can be made with a lab closer to where you live.
  6. Please observe your FASTING instructions.  You will need to fast from food 6-8 hrs prior to your procedure. However, you may drink clear liquids only (no coffee) up to 4 hours prior to your procedure.
  7. You will be given instructions on where to present on the day of your procedure.   You may be told  to come directly to the IR suite, or go to short- stay for needed labs or other preparations. 
After your Procedure, (for same day procedures):
  1. Immediately after the procedure, you will be recovered in Short-stay.  We will observe for any complications.   You can plan to leave the hospital in 2-3 hours after your procedure is completed.  Medications may be prescribed that you can pick up at the outpatient pharmacy prior to leaving (or a pharmacy of your choice).
  2. You will need a driver home as sedation will be given.
  3. You will be able to maintain normal activities, except heavy lifting for the next 3-7 days.    Many IR procedures access a major blood vessel.  You will be given specific instructions on how to manage your wound.    No aerobics, heavy lifting, bicycling, running or strenuous physical exercise.
  4. Resume all of your regular medicines, EXCEPT those that you have been given specific instructions to avoid, such as METFORMIN or Blood thinners. 
  5. We may need to see you again to determine if  further treatment will be necessary.  The IR staff will notify you of the date and time of the next needed appointment.
  6. Post Procedure instructions will be discussed and given to you following your procedure.  Compliance with these instructions will help to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes for you.  It is our intention to give you the best possible care throughout your treatment. 
After procedures that require an overnight hospital stay:

Needed information will be reviewed during your clinic visit prior to scheduling your procedure.

You may contact Interventional Radiology by calling 801-581-2967 Mon- Fri 8 am to 5 pm and speak to our clinical coordinator for any of your treatment concerns. For after hour emergent concerns call the hospital paging operator at 801-581-2121 and ask for the IR resident on call.

OB Ultrasound


Full bladder for 24 weeks gestation or less
Complete Abdominal Ultrasound Exam:

For your abdominal ultrasound, we must ask that you have nothing to eat or drink 8 hours prior to the exam.  It is very important to be properly prepped for an abdominal ultrasound.

If you are on any medications, please take them with a small amount of water in the morning.  Please call us with any questions at 581-2929.  Our sonographers will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Female Pelvic Ultrasound Exam:

For your pelvic ultrasound, we ask that you finish one quart of fluid (32 oz) 1 hour prior to your appointment. Do not empty your bladder after you begin drinking the liquid.  This ensures that you will have a full bladder by the time of your appointment.  A full bladder is necessary for this exam.

If you are on any medications, you may take them as usual. Please call us with any questions at 581-2929.  Our sonographers will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Post void residual/kidney and bladder ultrasound:

For your kidney and bladder ultrasound, we ask that you finish one quart of fluid (32 oz) 1 hour prior to your appointment. Do not empty your bladder after you begin drinking the liquid.  This ensures that you will have a full bladder by the time of your appointment.  A full bladder is necessary for this exam.

If you are on any medications, please take them as usual.  Please call us with any questions at 581-2929.  Our sonographers will be happy to answer any questions you may have.