UNI Downtown Behavioral Health Clinic - (801) 585-1212

The Behavioral Health Clinic offers outpatient services for adults, children, and adolescents. The clinic provides psychiatric evaluation and diagnosis, consultation, and medication management as well as therapy services.

The clinic is staffed by board certified psychiatrists, board certified triple-board practitioners (physicians who specialize in pediatrics, adult psychiatry, and child and adolescent psychiatry), advanced practice nurses, clinical psychologists, clinical social workers, and senior residents.  The residents provide care under the direct supervision of board certified psychiatrists.

UNI Research Park Behavioral Health Clinics - (801) 585-1575

Recovery Clinic

Offering treatment for both alcohol and drug addiction. Learn more.

Transition Clinic

The Transition Clinic is a resource for patients who have discharged from the University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) inpatient hospital within the last 60 days. This clinic is designed to offer continued psychiatric treatment if there is a wait to get established with a long term psychiatric provider after you leave the hospital. This clinic is available on Monday evenings and is staffed with resident physicians who are training in psychiatry. The residents provide care under the direct supervision of board certified psychiatrists.

UNI Farmington Behavioral Health Clinic - (801) 585-1212*

The Behavioral Health Clinic offers outpatient services for seniors, adults, adolescents and children. The clinic provides psychiatric evaluation and diagnosis, consultation, and medication management as well as therapy services.

*This clinic is temporarily located at 501 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City until November 2016

Anxiety Disorders

There are several anxiety disorders that require the clinical care of a psychiatrist or other mental health professional. Listed in the directory below are some, for which we have provided a brief overview.

Panic Disorder

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Phobias

Major Depression

What is depression?

Depression is a serious mood disorder that affects your whole body including your mood and thoughts. It touches every part of your life. It’s important to know that depression is not a weakness or character flaw. It’s a chemical imbalance in your brain that needs to be treated.

If you have one episode of depression, you are at risk of having more throughout life.  If you don’t get treatment, depression can happen more often and be more serious.

What causes depression?

Depression is caused by an imbalance of brain chemicals. Other factors also play a role. It also tends to run in families. Depression can be triggered by life events or certain illnesses. It can also develop without a clear trigger.

What are the symptoms of depression?

While each person may experience symptoms differently, these are the most common symptoms of depression:

  • Lasting sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Loss of interest in almost all activities
  • Appetite and weight changes
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as inability to sleep or sleeping too much
  • Slowing of physical activity, speech, and thinking OR agitation, increased restlessness, and irritability
  • Decreased energy, feeling tired or "slowed down" almost every day
  • Ongoing feelings of worthlessness and/or feelings of undue guilt
  • Trouble concentrating or making decisions
  • Repeating thoughts of death or suicide, wishing to die, or attempting suicide (Note: This needs emergency treatment )

If you have 5 or more of these symptoms for at least 2 weeks, you may be diagnosed with depression. These feelings are a noticeable change from what’s “normal” for you.

The symptoms of depression may look like other mental health conditions. Always see a healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is depression diagnosed?

Depression can happen along with other medical conditions. These include heart disease, or cancer, as well as other mental health conditions. Early diagnosis and treatment is key to recovery.

A diagnosis is made after a careful mental health exam and medical history done. This is usually done by a mental health professional.

How is depression treated?

Treatment for depression may include one or a combination of the following:

  • Medicine. Antidepressants work by affecting the brain chemicals. Know that it takes 4 to 6 weeks for these medicines to have a full effect. Keep taking the medicine, even if it doesn’t seem to be working at first. Never stop taking your medicine without first talking to your healthcare provider. Some people have to switch medicines or add medicines to get results. Work closely with your healthcare provider to find treatment that works for you.
  • Therapy. This is most often cognitive behavioral and/or interpersonal therapy. It focuses on changing the distorted views you have of yourself and your situation. It also works to improve relationships, and identify and manage stressors in your life.
  • Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). This treatment may be used to treat severe, life-threatening depression that has not responded to medicines. A mild electrical current is passed through the brain. This triggers a brief seizure. For unknown reasons, the seizures help restore the normal balance of chemicals in the brain and ease symptoms.

With treatment, you should feel better within a few weeks. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or even years. Continued treatment may help to prevent depression from appearing again.

Depression can make you feel exhausted, worthless, helpless, and hopeless. It’s important to realize that these negative views are part of the depression and do not reflect reality. Negative thinking fades as treatment begins to take effect. Meanwhile, consider the following:

  • Get help. If you think you may be depressed, see a healthcare provider as soon as possible.
  • Set realistic goals in light of the depression and don’t take on too much.
  • Break large tasks into small ones. Set priorities, and do what you can as you can.
  • Try to be with other people and confide in someone. It’s usually better than being alone and secretive.
  • Do things that make you feel better. Going to a movie, gardening, or taking part in religious, social, or other activities may help. Doing something nice for someone else can also help you feel better.
  • Get regular exercise.
  • Expect your mood to get better slowly, not right away. Feeling better takes time.
  • Eat healthy, well-balanced meals.
  • Stay away from alcohol and drugs. These can make depression worse.
  • It is best to delay important decisions until the depression has lifted. Before deciding to make a big change --change jobs, get married or divorced -- discuss it with others who know you well and have a more objective view of your situation.
  • Remember: People don’t "snap out of" a depression. But they can feel a little better day-by-day.
  • Try to be patient and focus on the positives. This may help replace the negative thinking that is part of the depression. The negative thoughts will fade as your depression responds to treatment.
  • Let your family and friends help you.

When to call your healthcare provider

If you have 5 or more of these symptoms for at least 2 weeks, call your healthcare provider:
  • Lasting sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Loss of interest in almost all activities
  • Appetite and weight changes
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as inability to sleep or sleeping too much
  • Slowing of physical activity, speech, and thinking OR agitation, increased restlessness, and irritability
  • Decreased energy, feeling tired or "slowed down" almost every day
  • Ongoing feelings of worthlessness and/or feelings of undue guilt
  • Trouble concentrating or making decisions
  • Repeating thoughts of death or suicide, wishing to die, or attempting suicide (Note: This needs emergency treatment )

Key points about depression

  • Depression is a serious mood disorder that affects your whole body including your mood and thoughts.
  • It’s caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. Some types of depression seem to run in families.
  • Depression causes ongoing, extreme feelings of sadness, helplessness, hopeless, and irritability. These feelings are usually a noticeable change from what’s “normal” for you, and they last for more than two weeks.
  • Depression may be diagnosed after a careful psychiatric exam and medical history done by a mental health professional.
  • Depression is most often treated with medicine or therapy, or a combination of both.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your healthcare provider:

  • Know the reason for your visit and what you want to happen.
  • Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.
  • Bring someone with you to help you ask questions and remember what your provider tells you.
  • At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you.
  • Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed, and how it will help you. Also know what the side effects are.
  • Ask if your condition can be treated in other ways.
  • Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean.
  • Know what to expect if you do not take the medicine or have the test or procedure.
  • If you have a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.
  • Know how you can contact your provider if you have questions.

A Checklist for Depression

What's the difference between a bad case of the blues and the painful mental disorder known as depression? According to the experts, impaired functioning is usually a clear-cut indication of a major depression.

Here's a quick checklist of depression symptoms. If the list sounds familiar, you may want to see a counselor or a psychiatrist.

  • Depressive mood. Do you suffer from feelings of worthlessness, helplessness, or pessimism for days at a time?

  • Sleep disturbance. Do you have trouble falling asleep at night or trouble staying asleep—waking up in the middle of the night or too early in the morning? Are you sleeping too much?

  • Chronically fatigued. Do you frequently feel tired or lack energy?

  • Isolation. Have you stopped meeting with family or friends? Increasing isolation and diminished interest or pleasure in activities are major signs of depression.

  • Appetite disturbance. Are you eating far less than usual—or far more? Severe and continuing appetite disturbance is often an indication of depression.

  • Inability to concentrate. If you can't seem to focus on even routine tasks, it's probably time to get some help.

  • Dependence on mood-altering substances. If you depend on alcohol or other drugs to make it through the day, you may be suffering from depression. Often, the substance abuse causes symptoms that mimic the appearance of clinical depression, but are, in fact, due wholly to the drug use.

  • Feeling a sense of inappropriate guilt

  • Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide or a suicide attempt

Philip L. Baese, M.D.

Philip Luke Baese, MD, FAPA completed medical school training in 1997 at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He moved to Salt Lake City, Utah and completed a 5 year combined residency training program - Triple Board - in 2002. Upon completing this program, he became board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the Americ... Read More

Specialties:

Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent

Locations:

650 Komas
Neurobehavior H.O.M.E. Program
(801) 581-5515
Behavioral Health Clinic (801) 585-1212

Roxanne L. Bartel, M.D.

Dr. Roxanne Bartel currently works at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Utah. She trained at Yale School of Medicine and the Massachusetts Mental Health Center in Boston. Dr. Bartel has worked for 20 years as an inpatient psychiatrist in the University of Ut... Read More

Robert D. Birch, D.O.

Robert Birch, D.O., is an inpatient physician for the adult unit at UNI and the University Hospital. His interests and expertise are in the diagnosis and treatment of complex substance abuse cases.... Read More

Lowry A. Bushnell, M.D.

Dr. Lowry Bushnell was born and raised in Utah. Following completion of his military service he attended the University of Utah, College of Pharmacy, receiving a degree in medical biology. He has a specialty interest in psychopharmacology. He received his medical training at the University of Utah, College of Medicine and his psychiatry specialty t... Read More

Wilbur R. Dattilo, M.D.

Dr. Wilbur Dattilo, Instructor (Clinical), is a native of Madison, Indiana.  After spending 2 years in Tokyo, Japan on an LDS mission, he studied Philosophy and Japanese at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.  After graduating in 2004, he joined Teach For America and spent 3 years teaching middle school science on the border of Mexico in Brown... Read More

Stamatios G. M. Dentino, M.D.

Dr. Dentino is an adult psychiatric attending physician at the University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute. In his practice, he focuses primarily on the acute inpatient setting. With his clinical range, he is able to provide evidence-based psychiatric medicine to those in need of acute management and stabilization. Dr. Dentino believes that to p... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Paula Gibbs, M.D.

Dr. Gibbs completed medical school at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1983. She completed Family Practice Residency at The University of Utah 1983-1986 and practiced as a family doctor in Park City, Utah from 1996 to 1993. She was also part of a group practice in a county without a medical hospital. Dr. Gibbs was the EMS director for ... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

University Hospital
Psychiatry
(801) 581-7952

Douglas D. Gray, M.D.

As a suicidologist, Dr. Gray studies suicide completers in an attempt to better understand suicide risk factors, and to help develop future suicide prevention programs across the age span. He uses psychological autopsies, genetics and toxicology methods to make inroads to get a better understanding of suicide risk factors. His clinical focus is pri... Read More

Elizabeth F. Howell, M.D., M.S.

Dr. Elizabeth Howell is Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Clinical) at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, Utah, with an inpatient and outpatient practice at the University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute. She is the Training Director for the Addiction Psychiatry fellowship program at the University of Utah School of M... Read More

Jessica Z. Howsley, M.D.

Dr. Howsley provides outpatient psychiatric care at the University of Utah Behavioral Health Clinic where she specializes in working with young adults and women who experience a wide range of mental health issues.... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

Behavioral Health Clinic (801) 585-1212

Jason W. Hunziker, M.D.

Dr. Hunziker is a graduate of the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, UT. He completed his residency at the University of Utah School of Medicine and is board-certified in general adult psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. As an Assistant Professor, clinical track, he supervises psychiatry and family practice residents (incl... Read More

Brent M. Kious, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Kious practices inpatient adult psychiatry with a focus on the management of severe persistent mental illness. He also works in a transdisciplinary capacity in the Department of Neurology, where he focuses on the management of Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders as well as their psychiatric comorbidities.... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

Imaging & Neurosciences Center (801) 585-6387
University Neuropsychiatric Institute (801) 583-2500

Sebastian Kreitschitz, M.D.

Dr. Kreitschitz treats adults at the University of Utah's Neuropsychiatric Institute. Previously, he worked as co-chief resident at the University of Utah's Adult Psychiatry residency program. In the processes of treating depression, anxiety, mania, psychosis, and substance dependence, clinically he holds an interest in empowering patients to gai... Read More

Benjamin Lewis, M.D.

Dr. Lewis practices inpatient adult psychiatry and his clinical interests involve the diagnosis and treatment of major psychiatric disorders with an emphasis on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Other clinical interests include catatonia and treatment-resistant depression. He chairs the UNI Ethics Committee and is interested in ethical dilemmas... Read More

Anne G. Lin, M.D.

Dr. Lin is a board-certified child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist. She has practiced at the Behavioral Health Clinic at the University of Utah since 2004. Clinically she is interested in Mood disorders, Anxiety disorders, Obsessive compulsive disorder, Tourette's disorder, and Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In the past she has w... Read More

Melissa P. Lopez-Larson, M.D.

Dr. Lopez-Larson joined the University of Utah in the Fall of 2008. Dr. Lopez-Larson is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist and received her M.D. from the University of Cincinnati School of Medicine. Dr. Lopez-Larson performed her adult and child psychiatry training at Harvard Medical School training sites including Massachusetts General Hospital/M... Read More

Specialties:

Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent

Locations:

Behavioral Health Clinic (801) 585-1212

Rachele M. McCarthey, M.D.

Rachele M. McCarthey, MD received her medical degree from the University of Utah School of Medicine. She completed her residency in the triple board program (pediatrics, psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry) at the University of Utah. She is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry in the division of child and adolescent psychiatry ... Read More

J. Michael McIntosh, M.D.

Dr. McIntosh graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles Medical School, completed residency training at the University of Colorado and is board-certified in general adult psychiatry. He is Professor with tenure in the Department of Psychiatry and Research Professor in the Department of Biology. Dr. McIntosh is also the Medical Di... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Forensic

Locations:

University Hospital
Psychiatry
(801) 581-7951

Brian J. Mickey, M.D., Ph.D.

Brian J. Mickey is Associate Professor of Psychiatry.  He studied physics and biology at the University of Washington, Seattle.  He then completed the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned his MD and PhD in Neuroscience.  After psychiatry residency and postdoctoral fellowship at the Molecular &... Read More

Matthew L. Moench, M.D.

Growing up in Salt Lake City, Dr. Moench was introduced to psychiatry at the breakfast table by two other Dr. Moenches -- his father and grandfather, both of whom were psychiatrists. More formally, he completed medical school at the University of Virginia and residency at Stanford University, where he served as Chief Resident and received extensiv... Read More

David Moulton, M.D.

Dr. Moulton is the attending Forensic Psychiatrist, University Neuropsychiatric Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, July 2012 to present. Responsible for the management of a 10-patient inpatient psychiatric teaching service. This service provides world-class medical care while providing psychiatry clerkship and residency education to medical students an... Read More

Duy Pham, M.D.

Dr. Pham specializes in addiction and substance abuse related issues. He is currently an inpatient and outpatient physician at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) and supervises adult psychiatry residents through the Recovery Center at UNI. He is an advisor/mentor to the medical students and residents. As an Addiction Psychiatrist Dr. ... Read More

Maria M. Reyes, M.D.

Maria Reyes, M.D., Assistant Professor (Clinical), earned her medical degree at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 2010.  She completed her psychiatry residency and finished a geriatric psychiatry fellowship at the Mayo Clinic, where she also served as an Instructor of Psychiatry at the Mayo Medical School.  Dr. Reyes is board certified i... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Leonard J. Schmidt, M.D.

Clinical Activities: Forty percent of my time is devoted to direct clinical care of patients. I have an outpatient practice wherein I focus primarily on treatment refractory mood and anxiety disorders. With this limited practice effort,, I have given priority to serving my faculty colleagues with their needs for psychiatric consultation. I also ... Read More

Patrick W. Shea, M.D.

Dr. Patrick Shea, Assistant Professor (Clinical), received his medical degree from University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston where he became interested in pediatrics and psychiatry. He completed his triple-board residency training at the University of Utah in Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in 2014. During h... Read More

Specialties:

Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry, Child

Locations:

650 Komas
Neurobehavior H.O.M.E. Program
(801) 581-5515
University Hospital
Infectious Diseases, Clinic 1A
(801) 585-2031

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Neuromodulation, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Paul T. Stevens, M.D.

Dr. Paul Stevens, Instructor (Clinical), earned his medical degree at the University of Utah School of Medicine.  He then completed the Triple Board residency (pediatrics, adult psychiatry, child & adolescent psychiatry) at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where he served as co-chief resident during his final year.  During resi... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry, Child

Locations:

650 Komas
Neurobehavior H.O.M.E. Program
(801) 581-5515

Paul D. Thielking, M.D.

Patient Rating:

4.9

4.9 out of 5

Paul Thielking, MD, a Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) physician and investigator, is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr Thielking works with HCI's Supportive Oncology and Survivorship service doing outpatient clinical work and inpatient consultation. Dr. Thielking focuses on a co... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Pain Medicine & Palliative Care, Psychiatry

Locations:

Huntsman Cancer Hospital
Clinic 2B, Supportive Oncology and Survivorship (SOS)
(801) 213-4246

Jeremy E. Thueson, M.D.

Dr. Jeremy Thueson, Assistant Professor (Clinical), earned his M.D. at the University of Utah. He then completed his psychiatry residency at the University of Washington where he was chief resident of the inpatient and consult/liaison services at the University of Washington Medical Center during his final year of residency. Following that, he al... Read More

Michelle Vo, M.D.

Dr. Vo is an outpatient child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Utah Behavioral Health Clinic, and the Director of the Medical Student Wellness Program. She completed Triple Board training in Pediatrics, General Psychiatry, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Utah, where she served as chief resident. She also see... Read More

Specialties:

Psychiatry, Child

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Rachel A. Weir, M.D.

Dr. Weir treats children, adolescents, and young adults at the Behavioral Health Clinic at the University of Utah.   As a primary career focus, Dr. Weir is committed to increasing the accessibility of mental health services, and finding innovative ways to provide mental health treatment in primary care and other medical settings. She is currently a... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Kamile M. Weischedel, M.D.

Dr. Kamile Melek Weischedel, Instructor (Clinical), earned her MD at Istanbul University. She then spent 2,5 years in psychiatry residency in her home country before she moved to the United States. She worked as a postdoc research associate at Yale University before joining University of Utah Department of Psychiatry to complete her residency train... Read More

Matthew M. Woolley, Ph.D.

MATTHEW M. WOOLLEY, Ph.D. LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST: Utah License Number: 345852-2501 License Issued: June, 2005 EDUCATION: Post Graduate: Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Post Doctoral Residency in Child and Adolescent Psychology; October 2003 to October 2004. Graduate School: Wichita State University... Read More

Paula Gibbs, M.D.

Dr. Gibbs completed medical school at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1983. She completed Family Practice Residency at The University of Utah 1983-1986 and practiced as a family doctor in Park City, Utah from 1996 to 1993. She was also part of a group practice in a county without a medical hospital. Dr. Gibbs was the EMS director for ... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

University Hospital
Psychiatry
(801) 581-7952

Elizabeth F. Howell, M.D., M.S.

Dr. Elizabeth Howell is Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Clinical) at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, Utah, with an inpatient and outpatient practice at the University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute. She is the Training Director for the Addiction Psychiatry fellowship program at the University of Utah School of M... Read More

Mark Rindflesh, M.D.

Dr. Rindflesh has specialized in the treatment of eating disorders and has had a particular interest in working with parents in both individual and group settings to assist them in dealing with children and adolescents being treated for psychiatric problems. He has also worked in a rural setting, Sweetwater County, Wyoming, providing assessment an... Read More

Specialties:

Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Leonard J. Schmidt, M.D.

Clinical Activities: Forty percent of my time is devoted to direct clinical care of patients. I have an outpatient practice wherein I focus primarily on treatment refractory mood and anxiety disorders. With this limited practice effort,, I have given priority to serving my faculty colleagues with their needs for psychiatric consultation. I also ... Read More

Jeremy E. Thueson, M.D.

Dr. Jeremy Thueson, Assistant Professor (Clinical), earned his M.D. at the University of Utah. He then completed his psychiatry residency at the University of Washington where he was chief resident of the inpatient and consult/liaison services at the University of Washington Medical Center during his final year of residency. Following that, he al... Read More

  • Maryrose Bauschka, MD
  • Nick Hurst, MD
  • Kelly Irons, MD
  • Emily McMillan, MD
  • Joshua Mitchell, MD
  • Jay Nichols, MD
  • Anthony Peterson, MD
  • Sheena Ray, DO
  • Darrell Roberge, MD
  • Allie Shapiro, MD
  • Daniela Solzbacher, MD
  • Wei Song, MD
  • Jacob Stephenson, MD
  • Keerthi Vejerla, MD
  • Michael Warden, DO
  • Rong Xiao, MD
  • Amanda Speer, LCSW
  • Marv Hamilton, LCSW
  • Maryrose Bauschka, MD
  • Nick Hurst, MD
  • Joshua Mitchell, MD
  • Jay Nichols, MD
  • Sheena Ray, DO
  • Keerthi Vejerla, MD
  • Michael Warden, DO
  • Rong Xiao, MD
Behavioral Health Clinic
525 East 100 South, 5th Floor
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
Map
(801) 585-1212
University Neuropsychiatric Institute 501 Chipeta Way
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108
Map
(801) 583-2500
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