Sports Injuries

  • Exercise

    Exercise doesn't have to be vigorous to offer health benefits. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity daily, or on most days of the week.

  • Sports Injuries: When to Call the Doctor

    Sports injuries can be either acute traumatic, which require immediate medical care, or chronic overuse injuries.

  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner's Knee)

    Runner's knee occurs when the kneecap rubs against the thighbone as it moves. The condition can be caused by a structural defect or a certain way of walking or running.

  • Preventing Sports Injuries

    Good preventive steps: Warm up before you work out, alternate days for exercising certain muscle groups, and cool down when you're done.

  • Sports and Fractures

    Stress fractures are weak spots or small cracks in the bone caused by continuous overuse. They often occur in the foot after training for basketball, running, and other sports.

  • Shin Splints

    Shin splints involve damage to one of two groups of muscles along the shin bone that cause pain. The location of the shin splint pain depends on which group of muscles is damaged.

  • Thirst and Dehydration

    The average adult has 10 to 12 gallons of water in his or her body, accounting for 60 percent of body weight. That water plays a critical role in nearly every bodily process. And being a quart or two low can affect how you feel.

  • Exercise and the Aging Person

    Exercise is good for people of all ages. It helps lower blood pressure, reduces the risks for falls and serious injuries, and slows the body's loss of muscle and bone mass.

  • Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper's Knee)

    Jumper's knee is also known as patellar tendonitis. It may be caused by overuse of the knee joint, such as frequent jumping on hard surfaces.

  • Lumbar Strain (Weight Lifter's Back)

    A lumbar strain is an injury to the lower back, which results in damaged tendons and muscles that spasm and feel sore.