A miscarriage is an unexpected loss of pregnancy before the 20th week of pregnancy. Most miscarriages happen very early in the pregnancy, often before a woman even knows she is pregnant.

Factors that may contribute to miscarriage include the following:

Signs of a miscarriage include vaginal spotting, abdominal pain or cramping, and fluid or tissue passing from the vagina. Bleeding can be a symptom of miscarriage, but many women also have it in early pregnancy and don't miscarry. To be sure, contact your health care provider right away if you have bleeding.

Women who miscarry early in their pregnancy usually do not need any treatment. In some cases, there is tissue left in the uterus. Doctors use a procedure called a dilatation and curettage (D&C) or medicines to remove the tissue.

Counseling may help you cope with your grief. Later, if you do decide to try again, work closely with your health care provider to lower the risks. Many women who have a miscarriage go on to have healthy babies.*

What Is Recurrent Pregnancy Loss?

Recurrent pregnancy loss—also called repeated pregnancy loss or repeated miscarriage—is when you have three or more miscarriages, one right after the other. Most women miscarry in the first trimester or early in the second trimester. Many women have miscarriages. In fact, for any pregnant woman, she has a 15 to 20 percent chance of having a miscarriage.

It’s normal to worry if you’ve lost a pregnancy. But if you’ve only had one miscarriage, you shouldn’t worry that you’ll never have a healthy pregnancy. If you’ve had only one miscarriage, you are just as likely to carry your next pregnancy to full term as women who’ve never had a miscarriage.

Your chance of having additional miscarriages goes up if you’ve had more than two miscarriages. Your chances of having many miscarriages also increases if you’re 40 or older. If you are 40 years old or more and have had multiple miscarriages, you have a much higher chance of having additional miscarriages compared to younger women.

How Quickly Can You Get Pregnant After a Miscarriage?

Fortunately, you have a good chance of having a healthy baby even if you’ve suffered through many miscarriages. Many women find support from counseling services and learning as much about miscarriage as they can.

If you’d like to increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy, take the following steps:

  • Live a healthy lifestyle
  • Take a folic acid supplement regularly
  • Stop smoking
  • Stay at healthy weight
  • Drink only a little bit of alcohol, or don’t drink at all
  • Limit how much caffeine you drink each day

*Courtesy: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Douglas T. Carrell, PhD, HCLD

Doug Carrell received his Ph.D. degree in reproductive physiology from the University of Utah in 1995, after receiving a M.S. degree in cellular and developmental biology from Brigham Young University. Dr. Carrell has worked in the area of research and treatment of human infertility for 35 years. Dr. Carrell is the clinical laboratory director of t... Read More

Specialties:

Andrology, In Vitro Fertilization, Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

Locations:

Andrology & IVF Laboratories 801-581-3740

Erica B. Johnstone, MD

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Erica B. Johnstone, M.D., M.H.S., is a gynecologist and reproductive endocrinologist in the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Dr. Johnstone clinical interests include reproductive endocrine disorders and all types of infertility, and she also works with hormonal disorders in children and adolescents. Her research interests in... Read More

Megan Link, MD

Megan H. Link, M.D., is a gynecologist and reproductive endocrinologist in the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility.  Dr. Link’s clinical interests include endometriosis, fertility preservation, reproductive endocrine disorders and all types of infertility.  Dr. Link received her bachelor’s degree from The College of Idaho and ear... Read More

C. Matthew Peterson, MD

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Matthew Peterson, M.D., is a Reproductive Endocrinologist in the University of Utah Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Peterson received his undergraduate degree, magna cum laude from Brigham Young University in 1977 and his M.D. from the University of Utah in 1981. His residency training in obstetrics and gynecology was accomplished at M... Read More

Specialties:

OB/Gyn, General, Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Reproductive Medicine services are available at the Utah Center for Reproductive Medicine as well as multiple locations through out the state of Utah, including Centerville, Orem, South Jordan and Park City. Our reproductive endocrinologists offer a wide range of services including:

  • Infertility counseling
  • Infertility monitoring and treatment
  • IUD insertion and removal
  • Annual gynecological exams
  • Endocrinology
  • Diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome
  • In vitro fertilization
  • Treatment of endometriosis
  • Pediatric and adolescent gynecology services

Our highly trained reproductive endocrinology specialists are experts in both the treatment and research of infertility and our clinic consistently boasts one of the highest success rates in the nation.

Neighborhood Health Center Locations:

Utah Center for Reproductive Medicine 675 Arapeen Drive, Suite 205
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108-1237
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University of Utah Health
Centerville Health Center
26 South Main
Centerville, Utah 84014
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Dixie Regional Medical Center 544 South 300 East
St. George, UT 84770
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University of Utah Health
South Jordan Health Center
5126 W. Daybreak Parkway
South Jordan, 84009
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  • FIT-PLESE
    Keywords: Overweight, Infertility, BMI, Weight loss, Free, Reproductive medicine
    Status: Recruiting
  • FAZST
    Keywords: Fertility, reproductive medicine, pregnancy outcomes, folic acid and zinc supplementation trial, semen quality, infertility
    Status: Recruiting