Overview

What Is Venous Disease?

What Is Venous Disease?

Venous disease is any type of disease that affects how veins carry blood back to your heart. Arteries transport blood away from your heart, allowing your organs to get the important oxygen-rich blood they need to stay alive. Veins are different from arteries because they carry blood out of your organs and back to your heart.

Types of venous disease include:

  • venous insufficiency,
  • varicose and spider veins, and
  • vein thrombosis.

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Venous Insufficiency & Chronic Venous Insufficiency

Venous insufficiency is one type of venous disease. It causes problems with how blood flows through the veins in your legs. In healthy leg veins, the veins send blood up from your legs and back into your heart. But if you have venous disease, vein walls in your legs are damaged and weak.

Damaged valves inside your weak veins allow your blood to flow backwards—away from your heart—and back down into your legs. For this reason, venous insufficiency causes blood to stay or pool in your legs, especially when you’re standing up.

If your venous insufficiency lasts longer than three months, it’s also called chronic (long-term) venous insufficiency.

Varicose & Spider Veins

Both varicose and spider veins happen when blood inside your veins doesn’t flow the way it should.

Varicose veins happen when your blood vessels swell. This swelling causes blood to pool inside your blood vessels. Your blood vessels will look large and twisted and will raise up underneath your skin.

Spider veins are smaller than varicose veins and can look purple, blue, or red. They often look like a spider web pattern that you can see underneath your skin.

As many as three in five adults could have spider and varicose veins. People who work at jobs where they need to stay standing for a long period of time (like nurses and factory workers) are more likely to get varicose and spider veins. Women also have spider and varicose veins more often than men.

Treating Varicose Veins & Other Venous Diseases

Our comprehensive team of physicians, nurses, and staff work together to diagnose and treat many types of venous diseases. These include:

  • varicose veins,
  • venous insufficiency/ulcers, and
  • venous thrombosis.

We work individually with patients to find the treatment that best fits their needs, from surgical and minimally invasive treatments to specialty wound care and compression stockings.