Aug 21, 2020 2:00 PM


Lauri Linder, PhD, APRN, CPON and Xiaoyang Zhang, PhD

Two researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) received awards from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation to fund innovative childhood cancer research. Lauri Linder, PhD, APRN, CPON, is a researcher at HCI, associate professor with the College of Nursing at the U of U, and clinical nurse specialist at Primary Children’s Hospital, where she furthers her research in childhood cancers. Xiaoyang Zhang, PhD, is also a researcher at HCI and is assistant professor of oncological sciences at the U of U. Linder and Zhang are among the recipients of 53 St. Baldrick’s grants funded in the United States this year.

Every year since 2005, the St. Baldrick’s Foundation funds researchers studying promising ideas to improve outcomes in childhood cancer. This year, despite the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, the foundation awarded $12.9 million to researchers across the country to help accelerate new approaches to treating this devastating disease.

With pain being one of the most prevalent and distressing symptoms for children with cancer, Linder is using the grant from St. Baldrick’s Foundation to further develop a game-based symptom reporting app to help children communicate and record their pain. The U of U’s nationally recognized Therapeutic Games and Apps Lab (The GApp Lab) will provide programming support for this study.

“I am beyond delighted to have received this funding support,” Linder said. “Completing this project will position us for a larger project to improve pain management and quality of life for children receiving cancer treatment.”

Zhang will study a new potential therapeutic target in medulloblastoma, an aggressive childhood brain tumor, by using cutting-edge technologies and models.

“We are excited about the project as the findings may provide a new way to treat this aggressive childhood brain tumor,” Zhang said. “We will also have a great opportunity to collaborate with brain tumor experts like Dr. Samuel Cheshier at HCI throughout the project.”

Media Contact

Ashlee Harrison Bright
Public Relations – Huntsman Cancer Institute
public.affairs@hci.utah.edu
801-585-1954

Childhood Cancer cancer research Cancer Control and Population Sciences Nuclear Control of Cell Growth and Differentiation

About Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is the official cancer center of Utah. The cancer campus includes a state-of-the-art cancer specialty hospital as well as two buildings dedicated to cancer research. HCI treats patients with all forms of cancer and is recognized among the best cancer hospitals in the country by U.S. News and World Report. As the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in the Mountain West, HCI serves the largest geographic region in the country, drawing patients from Utah, Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. More genes for inherited cancers have been discovered at HCI than at any other cancer center in the world, including genes responsible for hereditary breast, ovarian, colon, head, and neck cancers, along with melanoma. HCI manages the Utah Population Database, the largest genetic database in the world, with information on more than 11 million people linked to genealogies, health records, and vital statistics. HCI was founded by Jon M. and Karen Huntsman.

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