Feb 15, 2018

Building onto a Dream: The Primary Children's and Families' Cancer Research Center

Huntsman Cancer Institute began in 1995 with an empty lot and a dream full of promise. Twenty-two years later, HCI opened a major expansion that doubled its research capacity.

Sep 13, 2016

Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel Announces Recommendations

On September 7, 2016, National Cancer Institute (NCI) Acting Director Douglas Lowy, MD, accepted the recommendations of the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) on a set of scientific approaches to accelerate progress in cancer research. An overview of the report was published in the journal Science.

Jul 05, 2016

HCI Convenes Cancer Moonshot Summit

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah participated in a national summit on the Cancer Moonshot initiative on June 29, 2016. The Cancer Moonshot Summits were organized at the request of Vice President Joe Biden, and more than 270 organizations hosted summits that brought together patients and survivors, researchers, physicians, advocates, philanthropists, and data and technology experts to brainstorm ways of speeding up progress in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care over the next five years—and to ultimately end cancer as we know it.

Mar 22, 2016

New Treatment Reduces Precancerous Polyps in Hereditary Cancer Patients

Inheriting a mutation in the APC gene leads to a nearly 100% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer. While colon cancer can be kept at bay by removing the large intestine, these patients also have up to a 15% risk of getting cancer in the small intestine, which is the leading cause of cancer death in this patient group. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), has identified the first prevention treatment for these patients, a two-drug combination that significantly reduces the number and size of precancerous polyps in the small intestine.

Dec 17, 2015

When Cancer of Unknown Origin Strikes, Family Members Are At Increased Risk

Cancer usually begins in one location and then spreads, but in 3-5% of cancer patients, the tissue where a cancer began is unknown. In these individuals a cancer diagnosis is made because it has metastasized to other sites. Patients with these so-called “cancers of unknown primary,” or CUP, have a very poor prognosis, with a median survival of three months. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Oncology finds that family members of CUP patients are at higher risk of developing CUP themselves, as well as cancers of the lung, pancreas, colon, and some cancers of the blood.