Cataract surgery is a once-in-a-lifetime investment in your eyes that can improve your quality of life for the long term. Advanced lens options can reduce or eliminate the need for glasses after surgery.

Types of Intraocular Lenses (IOLs)

Multifocal Lenses

State-of-the-art multifocal intraocular lenses reduce the need for reading glasses after cataract or lens replacement surgery. These lenses are designed to address the problem of presbyopia, in which people over the age of 40 begin to lose their ability to read or see up close. In the past, when an artificial lens, called an intraocular lens implant or IOL, was placed inside the eye during cataract or lens replacement surgery, it could only focus at a single distance. These IOLs are called single-focus IOLs and allow an eye to see either far away or close-up but not both.

Advanced intraocular lenses, called multifocal IOLs, provide correction for both near and distance vision. And both near and far objects can be in focus at the same time. Many people get used to multifocal IOLs right away. Others feel a little imbalanced at first but get used to it within a matter of days or weeks.

The Symfony Lense offers Extended Depth of Field

The Tecnis Symfony® lens, approved by the FDA in July, 2016, is an exciting advance in presbyopia lens technology. It provides excellent vision without glasses for distance (driving, watching TV) and intermediate visual tasks (computer work), and good vision quality at near distance (reading labels, cell phone) for most patients. The design of this new lens is also a leap forward in minimizing concerns about glare and halo that some patients experience after cataract surgery.

In addition, the FDA approval includes a version of the lens for people with astigmatism—the Tecnis Symfony Toric IOL. This means that patients with greater levels of astigmatism can now potentially choose to have a presbyopia-correcting lens without having to undergo other surgical procedures to correct the astigmatism. Visual results without glasses and patient satisfaction have been very high with this lens in reported clinical trials.  

Astigmatism Correction with Toric Lenses

The cornea (front window) of the eye can sometimes be more cone-shaped than spherical, which is called astigmatism. If you have astigmatism, leaving it untreated would mean you would need glasses for both distance and near vision after cataract removal. Your doctor can use laser reshaping of the cornea or an astigmatism-correcting lens implant to treat your astigmatism at the time of cataract removal.

Accommodating Lens Implants

These implants change position within your eye based on your eye muscle effort. Accommodating lenses can treat astigmatism, but give slightly less near power than multifocal lenses. They are typically used in patients who aren't eligible for multifocals because of mild or moderate glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinal scar tissue, corneal scars, or prior radial keratotomy. Medicare provides partial coverage for these lenses.

William R. Barlow, Jr., MD

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Dr. Barlow is an experienced comprehensive ophthalmologist and ocular surgeon with a specific interest in cataract and refractive surgery. He has experience performing complex cataract surgery, femtosecond laser cataract surgery, and refractive surgeries, such as LASIK, PRK, ICL, and clear lens extraction using premium intraocular lens technologies... Read More

Craig J. Chaya, MD

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4.7

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Craig J. Chaya, MD, practices comprehensive ophthalmology with a focus on the medical and surgical management of routine/complex cataracts and glaucoma at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He also practices at Moran’s clinics at the Redwood Health Center and Midvalley Health Center. He is an Assistant Clinical Profes... Read More

Alan S. Crandall, MD

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Alan S. Crandall focuses on the medical and surgical management of glaucoma and cataracts, as well as complicated anterior segment surgery. Dr. Crandall has experience with trabeculoplasty and laser cyclophotocoagulation. He is involved in numerous clinical research studies at the Moran Eye Center. Dr. Crandall lectures all over the world and was... Read More

Bradley J. Katz, MD, PhD

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Bradley Katz, MD, PhD, provides medical and surgical care of eye conditions including cataract, glaucoma, diabetes, and macular degeneration at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He specializes in neuro-ophthalmology and evaluates patients with diseases that affect the optic nerve, diseases that affect eye movements a... Read More

Marissa B. Larochelle, MD

Dr. Larochelle is Academic Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences at the John A. Moran Eye Center and specializes in cataract surgery as well as the diagnosis and management of patients with infectious and inflammatory conditions of the eye. She utilizes the latest medical and surgical treatment to care for patients with ocular dise... Read More

Amy Lin, MD

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4.7

4.7 out of 5

Amy Lin, MD, specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of corneal and anterior segment diseases at the Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and at the Moran Eye Center at the Midvalley Health Center. Her interests include corneal transplantation, anterior segment reconstruction, cataract surgery (including advanced technolo... Read More

Nick Mamalis, MD

Patient Rating:

4.8

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Nick Mamalis, MD, specializes in comprehensive ophthalmology including cataract and other anterior ocular surgeries at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. Dr. Mamalis also practices at the Moran’s Midvalley Eye Center in Murray, and Redwood Health Center in West Valley. As Director of the Ophthalmic Pathology Laborat... Read More

Mark D. Mifflin, MD

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4.8

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Mark D. Mifflin is a board-certified, fellowship trained cornea, cataract, and refractive surgeon with over 20 years of clinical experience.  His specialties include complex cataract surgery, all forms of corneal transplantion, reconstructive surgery of the anterior segment of the eye, and LASIK, PRK, and intraocular lens vision correction.  Dr. Mi... Read More

Jeff Pettey, MD

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4.7

4.7 out of 5

Jeff Pettey is the John Moran Eye Center Director of Education and an Assistant Professor at the University of Utah Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences.  Dr. Pettey specializes in complex cataract surgery and complex anterior segment surgery as with post-traumatic eye injuries.  He performs all forms of cataract surgery including premiu... Read More

Norm A. Zabriskie, MD

Patient Rating:

4.8

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Norm A. Zabriskie specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of glaucoma and cataracts. He is the Vice-Chairman of Clinical Operations and the Medical Director of the John A. Moran Eye Center. He has a research interest in the genetics of glaucoma.... Read More

Brian E. Zaugg, MD

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Brian Zaugg, MD, specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of corneal and anterior segment eye diseases, including expertise in all types of cornea transplantation, routine and complex cataract surgery (including multifocal lenses and laser assisted surgery), anterior segment reconstruction, pterygium removal, refractive surgery including L... Read More

John A. Moran Eye Center 65 Mario Capecchi Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
Map
801-581-2352
Midvalley Health Center 243 E 6100 S
Murray, UT 84107
Map
801-585-3937
Redstone Health Center 1743 W. Redstone Center Dr.
Park City, UT 84098
Map
435-658-9262
Redwood Health Center 1525 West 2100 South
Salt Lake City UT 84119
Map
801-213-8841
South Jordan Health Center 5126 W. Daybreak Parkway
South Jordan, UT 84009
Map
801-213-4500