Moran Eye Center Physicians Paul Bernstein and Mary Elizabeth Hartnett Appointed to University of Utah Endowed Chairs

Jul 09, 2018 9:00 AM

Tags: endowed chairs, ophthalmology, vision research, Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, MD, Paul S. Bernstein, MD

Two John A. Moran Eye Center clinician researchers now hold endowed chairs at the University of Utah.

University President Ruth Watkins appointed Paul S. Bernstein, MD, PhD, the Val A. and Edith D. Green Presidential Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology. The late couple established the chair in honor of the excellent care provided to Val by Mao Swartz, MD, as well as the outstanding work of Julia Kleinschmidt, PhD, and Alan Crandall, MD. Val Green retired from Coca-Cola, where he coordinated advertising and promotions for 14 states.

Bernstein is Moran’s director of clinical research and associate director of basic science research. He specializes in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with special emphasis on the role of nutrition and environment in its treatment and prevention; inherited retinal and macular dystrophies; and surgical treatment of vitreoretinal disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachments. His research focuses on the biochemistry and biophysics of nutritional interventions against inherited and acquired ocular disorders and the genetics and imaging of macular telangiectasia type II (MacTel).

hartnett_web.jpgWatkins appointed Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, MD, the Calvin S. and JeNeal N. Hatch Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology. The late Cal Hatch retired as chairman and CEO of Clorox Company, and the University recognized him with a Distinguished Alumni Award in 1994 for his business, civic, and philanthropic achievements. He and his late wife, JeNeal, were active members of the University’s Health Sciences Council and its National Advisory Council.

Hartnett is director of Moran’s Pediatric Retina Center and specializes in vitreoretinal surgery, managing both pediatric and adult retinal medical and surgical conditions. Hartnett's clinical interests include retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), or abnormal blood vessel development in the eye of a premature baby; pediatric vitreoretinopathies; trauma; retinal detachments; AMD, and diabetic eye disease. Her research focuses on the mechanisms of normal and aberrant blood vessel growth, particularly related to diabetic retinopathy, ROP, and AMD.

“We are so very thankful for the generosity and foresight of the Green and Hatch families in creating these chairs,” said Moran CEO Randall J Olson, MD. “These gifts will provide critical support for two of our most talented physician researchers. Partnerships like these allow Moran to provide cutting-edge care while simultaneously training the next generation of ophthalmologists and developing new treatments for blinding diseases.”