U Study Seeks Adults with ADHD, Alcohol Abuse Problems to Test Whether New Drug Can Help Stop Drinking

U Study Seeks Adults with ADHD, Alcohol Abuse Problems to Test Whether New Drug Can Help Stop Drinking

Apr 28, 2005 6:00 PM

Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) who abuse alcohol are eligible to participate in a University of Utah clinical trial to see whether a new drug can help them remain sober after theyve quit drinking.

The Mood Disorders Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry is seeking participants who are 21 or older and meet the clinical definition of ADHD. In the three weeks prior to joining the study, participants must have consumed at least three drinks of alcohol a day, or have consumed five drinks of alcohol in a single day at least once a week.

The trial is testing atomoxetine, the first non-stimulant medication for ADHD that was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Participants will be randomly assigned to take either atomoxetine or a placebo for 12 weeks, with the option to take Strattera, another FDA-approved drug for ADHD, for an additional 12 weeks.

People with ADHD often have difficulty developing satisfactory interpersonal relationships, have poor self-esteem, and struggle academically, intellectually, and socially.

Symptoms of ADHD include: attention difficulties (distractibility, difficulty listening, forgetfulness); hyperactivity (tendency to be overactive, restless, and fidgety); temper outbursts; frequent mood changes; boredom; feeling overwhelmed and overreacting to pressure; disorganization; and impulsiveness.

"Research conducted at the University of Utah and elsewhere suggests that many adults with alcohol problems have a history of ADHD," said Frederick W. Reimherr, M.D., the studys principal investigator and associate professor of psychiatry in the U School of Medicine.

For information, call Erika Williams at the Mood Disorders Clinic, (801) 585-6663.

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