People Allergic To Shrimp Sought For U of U Study Investigating Development of A Vaccine

People Allergic To Shrimp Sought For U of U Study Investigating Development of A Vaccine

Jul 22, 2008 2:00 PM

University of Utah medical researchers are seeking people allergic to shrimp for a study aimed at developing a vaccine for those who can’t eat the small shell fish.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the study is led by Gerald J. Gleich, M.D., research professor of dermatology and an allergy and immunology specialist at the U of U School of Medicine. Gleich wants to determine if there is more than one type of sensitivity to shrimp and then test whether sensitivity to shrimp can be reduced by vaccination with small pieces of the shrimp protein that causes allergy.

Recent studies suggest that vaccination with small pieces of the proteins causing allergic reactions to cats and to bee venom can lessen sensitivity. These studies show that allergy symptoms to cats and bees in allergic people are reduced, according to Gleich. He will investigate whether a vaccine for shrimp allergies can be developed from small pieces of the shrimp protein.

Study participants, who will receive compensation, will be given skin and blood tests to check for sensitivity to shrimp and related food such as crab and lobster.

People interested in participating in the study can call (801) 581-6465 for more information.

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Media Contacts

Gerald J. Gleich, M.D.
reserach professor , Dermatology Department
Phone: (801) 581-6465

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