Dr. Jeffrey Cline. On today's Health Minute, learn what you should do if your young athlete has any concussion symptoms including headaches, sleep problems, or dizziness.">

Sep 26, 2017 — Concussions for boys may be more common, but girls are also at risk, says University of Utah Health pediatrician Dr. Jeffrey Cline. On today's Health Minute, learn what you should do if your young athlete has any concussion symptoms including headaches, sleep problems, or dizziness.

Interview

Announcer: The Health Minute, produced by University of Utah Health.

Interviewer: Concussions, they can happen to both young girls and young boys, according to Dr. Jeffery Cline.

Dr. Cline: Boys are more common, but girls are at high risk for concussions. Women's soccer, especially, has a very high rate of concussion in young ladies.

Interviewer: So what are the symptoms to look for?

Dr. Cline: Many concussions are more mild and may be missed on the field. And so, if your son or daughter is coming home with headaches, sleep problems, dizziness, difficulty concentrating, sudden changes in the way they do their schoolwork, or failing at school, those may be symptoms of concussion. So, if your child and student athlete does have a head injury and they're having any of these symptoms, they need to be seen right away to make sure that their care is appropriate because even mild concussions can be under-looked and are important to be treated appropriately.

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