Dr. Troy Madsen explains how to use the F.A.S.T. system to quickly identify a stroke.">

Mar 15, 2018 — Caring for someone who suddenly suffers a stroke means acting FAST, literally. On today's Health Minute, emergency room physician Dr. Troy Madsen explains how to use the F.A.S.T. system to quickly identify a stroke.

Interview

Announcer: The Health Minute, produced by University of Utah Health.

Interviewer: When somebody's having a stroke, the faster you recognize that they're having a stroke, the better. Dr. Troy Madsen's an emergency room physician. What are the signs of stroke?

Dr. Madsen: Well, it's great that you use the word "fast" because that's what you think of when you think of the signs of a stroke. So think FAST. F stands for face, if part of their face is drooping. A for arms, if one arm seems weak. S is for speech, if their speech seems garbled or they can't get the right words out. T is for time, meaning it's a time-dependent thing. You want to get to the emergency department as quickly as possible.

Some other things I look for are coordination issues, balance issues, also leg weakness. These can all be signs of a stroke. So if you're with someone, they're having weakness, particularly on one side of the body, that's a reason to get to the emergency department as quickly as possible and to get that treatment for a stroke.

Announcer: To find out more about this and other health and wellness topics, visit thescoperadio.com.


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