Autotransplant surgeryKidney autotransplantation is a type of surgery that helps patients manage severe, long-lasting kidney pain. During the procedure, transplant surgeons remove the kidney that is causing pain and implant it in another part of your body.

Even though one of your kidneys has been moved, your body still functions normally because it has two healthy kidneys.

How Does It Work?

During a kidney autotransplant procedure, surgeons use a type of minimally-invasive surgery called laparoscopy to make small cuts (or incisions) to view the inside of your abdominal wall. Surgeons use a thin wire with a camera attached to help remove your kidney.

After your kidney is removed, surgeons then flush blood from your kidney and cool it down with a special solution to preserve your kidney. Surgeons then implant your kidney into a different area of your body behind your pelvic bone, next to your bladder.

Moving the kidney to another part of your body severs (or breaks) your kidney's connection with the nerve, causing the pain to stop.

Should I Have Autotransplant Surgery?

Many patients choose to have autotransplant surgery to relieve chronic pain caused by the following conditions:

  • Loin pain hematuria syndrome: Many patients have kidney autotransplant surgery to get relief from loin pain hematuria syndrome. This syndrome occurs when chronic injury - either from kidney stone disease or other processes - causes constant, chronic pain around your kidneys. Autotransplant surgery can relieve pain from this syndrome. 
  • Kidney injuries: Autotransplant surgery can relieve pain caused by your ureters (the ducts where urine passes from your kidneys to your bladder). With autotransplant surgery, surgeons can bypass or shorten the length of your ureter, relieving pain.
  • Short or injured ureters: Autotransplant surgery can also repair ureters that are injured or shortened.

Some patients also choose to have autotransplant surgery to protect their kidneys during cardiac surgery or thoracoabdominal aneurysm surgery. Having autotranslant surgery during these procedures protects your kidneys, allowing them to function normally after your surgery. 

Who is Eligible?

Kidney autotransplant is only an option for patients with severe kidney pain that has not improved with other treatments. Our team will review your medical issues and symptoms to help you determine if autotransplantion is the best option.

Our multidisciplinary team includes urologists, interventional radiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and transplant surgeons. We work together to develop a multidisciplinary care plan for you.

Research

University of Utah Health's autotransplant group has multiple ongoing research projects to determine how kidney transplant can help treat kidney disease. We are also actively publishing the results of these studies.

If you want to learn more, watch this video of a live kidney autotransplant surgery. Warning: This video contains graphic images. It includes images of live kidneys and other internal organs. Please do not watch this video if you are sensitive to graphic images.

SaveSaveSaveSave SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

Paul J. Campsen, MD

Patient Rating:

4.6

4.6 out of 5

Paul Jeffery Campsen, MD, FACS, FAST is the Surgical Director of Pancreas Transplantation, Adult and Pediatric Kidney Transplantation, and Living Donor Kidney Transplantation at the University of Utah.   He also specializes in Autotransplantation of the kidney for chronic kidney pain and loin pain hematuria syndrome.  He practices at the University... Read More

Blake D. Hamilton, MD

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Blake D. Hamilton, M.D.Dr. Hamilton has several areas of interest and expertise.His primary interest is minimally invasive kidney surgery. This began at the Cleveland Clinic in the 1990’s, where he was in the forefront of urologic laparoscopy. From there, he brought to Utah extensive experience in laparoscopic renal and adrenal surgery. He has been... Read More

Specialties:

Urology, Endourology, General Urology, Laparoscopy, Stone Disease, Vasectomy

Locations:

University Hospital
Urology
801-213-2700

Rulon Hardman, MD, PhD

Rulon Hardman, MD, PhD, is an assistant professor in Interventional Radiology at the University of Utah. Dr. Hardman completed his medical training at Dartmouth Medical School. He performed his residency in Diagnostic Radiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. While in residency, he also obtained a PhD in Radiologi... Read More

Specialties:

Radiology, Interventional Radiology

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Jeremy B. Myers, MD

Patient Rating:

4.8

4.8 out of 5

Dr. Myers completed specialty training with Dr. Jack McAninch at University of California, San Fransisco. His fellowship was in trauma and urologic reconstructive surgery. In his practice, Dr. Myers treats a variety of conditions. These include conditions like urethral strictures, ureteral scarring from previous surgery or congenital development... Read More

Specialties:

Urology, Bladder Augmentation, Complications of Spinal Cord Injury, Complications of Urologic Surgery, Female Incontinence, General Urology, Mesh Erosion, Neurogenic Bladder, Pelvic Fractures and Urethral Injury, Radiation Injuries, Trauma and Reconstructive Urology, Ureteral Stricture, Urethral Stricture, Urinary Diversion, Urinary Strictures and Fistula, Vesicovaginal Fistula

Locations:

University Hospital
Urology
801-213-2700

Ryan G. O'Hara, MD

Patient Rating:

4.7

4.7 out of 5

Dr. O’Hara completed his medical training at the University of Washington in Seattle followed by training in diagnostic radiology at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane, Washington. He then travelled to Philadelphia to pursue fellowship training in Vascular and Interventional Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania and obtained a certificate... Read More

University of Utah

University Hospital 50 N. Medical Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
Map
(801) 585-3188

More news and health information:

HealthFeed

Read more posts at the HealthFeed blog.