UNI Downtown Behavioral Health Clinic: 801-585-1212

The Behavioral Health Clinic offers outpatient services for adults, children, and adolescents. The clinic provides psychiatric evaluation and diagnosis, consultation, and medication management as well as therapy services.

The clinic is staffed by board certified psychiatrists, board certified triple-board practitioners (physicians who specialize in pediatrics, adult psychiatry, and child and adolescent psychiatry), advanced practice nurses, clinical psychologists, clinical social workers, and senior residents. The residents provide care under the direct supervision of board certified psychiatrists.

Rapid access one-time psychiatric consultations available at the Downtown Clinic. Learn More.

UNI Research Park Behavioral Health Clinics: 801-585-1575

Recovery Clinic

Offering treatment for both alcohol and drug addiction. Learn more.

Transition Clinic

The Transition Clinic is a resource for patients who have discharged from the University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) inpatient hospital within the last 60 days. This clinic is designed to offer continued psychiatric treatment if there is a wait to get established with a long term psychiatric provider after you leave the hospital. This clinic is available on Monday evenings and is staffed with resident physicians who are training in psychiatry. The residents provide care under the direct supervision of board certified psychiatrists.

UNI Farmington Behavioral Health Clinic: 801-213-3770

Our Behavioral Health Clinic in Farmington offers outpatient services for children, adolescents and adults.  This clinic also offers services for seniors aged 65 and older including specialty geriatric treatment for behavioral manifestation of the dementias, Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

The clinic provides psychiatric evaluation and diagnosis, consultation, and medication management as well as therapy services.

Anxiety Disorders

There are several anxiety disorders that require the clinical care of a psychiatrist or other mental health professional. Listed in the directory below are some, for which we have provided a brief overview.

Panic Disorder

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Phobias

Major Depression

What is depression?

Depression is a serious mood disorder that affects your whole body including your mood and thoughts. It touches every part of your life. It’s important to know that depression is not a weakness or character flaw. It’s a chemical imbalance in your brain that needs to be treated.

If you have one episode of depression, you are at risk of having more throughout life.  If you don’t get treatment, depression can happen more often and be more serious.

What causes depression?

Depression is caused by an imbalance of brain chemicals. Other factors also play a role. It also tends to run in families. Depression can be triggered by life events or certain illnesses. It can also develop without a clear trigger.

What are the symptoms of depression?

While each person may experience symptoms differently, these are the most common symptoms of depression:

  • Lasting sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Loss of interest in almost all activities
  • Appetite and weight changes
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as inability to sleep or sleeping too much
  • Slowing of physical activity, speech, and thinking OR agitation, increased restlessness, and irritability
  • Decreased energy, feeling tired or "slowed down" almost every day
  • Ongoing feelings of worthlessness and/or feelings of undue guilt
  • Trouble concentrating or making decisions
  • Repeating thoughts of death or suicide, wishing to die, or attempting suicide (Note: This needs emergency treatment )

If you have 5 or more of these symptoms for at least 2 weeks, you may be diagnosed with depression. These feelings are a noticeable change from what’s “normal” for you.

The symptoms of depression may look like other mental health conditions. Always see a healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is depression diagnosed?

Depression can happen along with other medical conditions. These include heart disease, or cancer, as well as other mental health conditions. Early diagnosis and treatment is key to recovery.

A diagnosis is made after a careful mental health exam and medical history done. This is usually done by a mental health professional.

How is depression treated?

Treatment for depression may include one or a combination of the following:

  • Medicine. Antidepressants work by affecting the brain chemicals. Know that it takes 4 to 6 weeks for these medicines to have a full effect. Keep taking the medicine, even if it doesn’t seem to be working at first. Never stop taking your medicine without first talking to your healthcare provider. Some people have to switch medicines or add medicines to get results. Work closely with your healthcare provider to find treatment that works for you.
  • Therapy. This is most often cognitive behavioral and/or interpersonal therapy. It focuses on changing the distorted views you have of yourself and your situation. It also works to improve relationships, and identify and manage stressors in your life.
  • Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). This treatment may be used to treat severe, life-threatening depression that has not responded to medicines. A mild electrical current is passed through the brain. This triggers a brief seizure. For unknown reasons, the seizures help restore the normal balance of chemicals in the brain and ease symptoms.

With treatment, you should feel better within a few weeks. Without treatment, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or even years. Continued treatment may help to prevent depression from appearing again.

Depression can make you feel exhausted, worthless, helpless, and hopeless. It’s important to realize that these negative views are part of the depression and do not reflect reality. Negative thinking fades as treatment begins to take effect. Meanwhile, consider the following:

  • Get help. If you think you may be depressed, see a healthcare provider as soon as possible.
  • Set realistic goals in light of the depression and don’t take on too much.
  • Break large tasks into small ones. Set priorities, and do what you can as you can.
  • Try to be with other people and confide in someone. It’s usually better than being alone and secretive.
  • Do things that make you feel better. Going to a movie, gardening, or taking part in religious, social, or other activities may help. Doing something nice for someone else can also help you feel better.
  • Get regular exercise.
  • Expect your mood to get better slowly, not right away. Feeling better takes time.
  • Eat healthy, well-balanced meals.
  • Stay away from alcohol and drugs. These can make depression worse.
  • It is best to delay important decisions until the depression has lifted. Before deciding to make a big change --change jobs, get married or divorced -- discuss it with others who know you well and have a more objective view of your situation.
  • Remember: People don’t "snap out of" a depression. But they can feel a little better day-by-day.
  • Try to be patient and focus on the positives. This may help replace the negative thinking that is part of the depression. The negative thoughts will fade as your depression responds to treatment.
  • Let your family and friends help you.

When to call your healthcare provider

If you have 5 or more of these symptoms for at least 2 weeks, call your healthcare provider:
  • Lasting sad, anxious, or “empty” mood
  • Loss of interest in almost all activities
  • Appetite and weight changes
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as inability to sleep or sleeping too much
  • Slowing of physical activity, speech, and thinking OR agitation, increased restlessness, and irritability
  • Decreased energy, feeling tired or "slowed down" almost every day
  • Ongoing feelings of worthlessness and/or feelings of undue guilt
  • Trouble concentrating or making decisions
  • Repeating thoughts of death or suicide, wishing to die, or attempting suicide (Note: This needs emergency treatment )

Key points about depression

  • Depression is a serious mood disorder that affects your whole body including your mood and thoughts.
  • It’s caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. Some types of depression seem to run in families.
  • Depression causes ongoing, extreme feelings of sadness, helplessness, hopeless, and irritability. These feelings are usually a noticeable change from what’s “normal” for you, and they last for more than two weeks.
  • Depression may be diagnosed after a careful psychiatric exam and medical history done by a mental health professional.
  • Depression is most often treated with medicine or therapy, or a combination of both.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your healthcare provider:

  • Know the reason for your visit and what you want to happen.
  • Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.
  • Bring someone with you to help you ask questions and remember what your provider tells you.
  • At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you.
  • Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed, and how it will help you. Also know what the side effects are.
  • Ask if your condition can be treated in other ways.
  • Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean.
  • Know what to expect if you do not take the medicine or have the test or procedure.
  • If you have a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.
  • Know how you can contact your provider if you have questions.

Philip L. Baese, MD

Philip Luke Baese, MD, FAPA completed medical school training in 1997 at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He moved to Salt Lake City, Utah and completed a 5 year combined residency training program - Triple Board - in 2002. Upon completing this program, he became board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the Americ... Read More

Specialties:

Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent

Locations:

650 Komas
Neurobehavior H.O.M.E. Program
801-581-5515
Behavioral Health Clinic 801-585-1212

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Paula Gibbs, MD

Dr. Gibbs completed medical school at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1983. She completed Family Practice Residency at The University of Utah 1983-1986 and practiced as a family doctor in Park City, Utah from 1996 to 1993. She was also part of a group practice in a county without a medical hospital. Dr. Gibbs was the EMS director for ... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

University Hospital
Psychiatry
801-581-7952

Elizabeth F. Howell, MD, MS

Dr. Elizabeth Howell is Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Clinical) at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, Utah, with an inpatient and outpatient practice at the University of Utah Neuropsychiatric Institute. She is the Training Director for the Addiction Psychiatry fellowship program at the University of Utah School of M... Read More

Jessica Z. Howsley, MD

Dr. Howsley provides outpatient psychiatric care at the University of Utah Behavioral Health Clinic where she specializes in working with young adults and women who experience a wide range of mental health issues.... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

Behavioral Health Clinic 801-585-1212

Specialties:

Psychiatry, Child

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Specialties:

Geriatrics, Social Work

Locations:

University Hospital
Geriatrics, Clinic 1
801-585-2140

Anne G. Lin, MD

Dr. Lin is a board-certified child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist. She has practiced at the Behavioral Health Clinic at the University of Utah since 2004. Clinically she is interested in Mood disorders, Anxiety disorders, Obsessive compulsive disorder, Tourette's disorder, and Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In the past she has w... Read More

Rachele M. McCarthey, MD

Rachele M. McCarthey, MD received her medical degree from the University of Utah School of Medicine. She completed her residency in the triple board program (pediatrics, psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry) at the University of Utah. She is currently an assistant professor of psychiatry in the division of child and adolescent psychiatry ... Read More

Matthew L. Moench, MD

Growing up in Salt Lake City, Dr. Moench was introduced to psychiatry at the breakfast table by two other Dr. Moenches -- his father and grandfather, both of whom were psychiatrists. More formally, he completed medical school at the University of Virginia and residency at Stanford University, where he served as Chief Resident and received extensiv... Read More

Maria M. Reyes, MD

Maria Reyes, M.D., Assistant Professor (Clinical), earned her medical degree at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 2010.  She completed her psychiatry residency and finished a geriatric psychiatry fellowship at the Mayo Clinic, where she also served as an Instructor of Psychiatry at the Mayo Medical School.  Dr. Reyes is board certified i... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Mark Rindflesh, MD

Dr. Rindflesh has specialized in the treatment of eating disorders and has had a particular interest in working with parents in both individual and group settings to assist them in dealing with children and adolescents being treated for psychiatric problems. He has also worked in a rural setting, Sweetwater County, Wyoming, providing assessment an... Read More

Specialties:

Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

L. Kristin Shadow, MD

Dr. Shadow has lived in Davis County, Utah since 1995. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Westminster College, Salt Lake City. She received her M.D. from University of Nevada School of Medicine. She completed the Triple Board Residency Program (Pediatrics, General Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry) at the University of Utah in 2000. She was... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Psychiatry

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Jeremy E. Thueson, MD

Dr. Jeremy Thueson, Assistant Professor (Clinical), earned his M.D. at the University of Utah. He then completed his psychiatry residency at the University of Washington where he was chief resident of the inpatient and consult/liaison services at the University of Washington Medical Center during his final year of residency. Following that, he al... Read More

Specialties:

Adult Behavioral Health, Physician Assistant, Psychiatry, Mood Disorders

Locations:

A location has not yet been added by this physician.

Michelle Vo, MD

Dr. Vo is an outpatient child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Utah Behavioral Health Clinic, and the Director of the Medical Student Wellness Program. She completed Triple Board training in Pediatrics, General Psychiatry, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Utah, where she served as chief resident. She also see... Read More

Specialties:

Psychiatry, Child

Locations:

Behavioral Health Clinic 801-585-1212

Rachel A. Weir, MD

Dr. Weir treats children, adolescents, and young adults at the Behavioral Health Clinic at the University of Utah.   As a primary career focus, Dr. Weir is committed to increasing the accessibility of mental health services, and finding innovative ways to provide mental health treatment in primary care and other medical settings. She sees patients ... Read More

Matthew M. Woolley, PhD

MATTHEW M. WOOLLEY, Ph.D.LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST: UtahLicense Number: 345852-2501License Issued: June, 2005EDUCATION:Post Graduate:Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI), University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Post Doctoral Residency in Child and Adolescent Psychology; October 2003 to October 2004.Graduate School:Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansa... Read More

UNI Downtown Behavioral Health Clinic
525 East 100 South, 5th Floor
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
Map
801-585-1212
UNI Outpatient & Recovery Clinic 501 Chipeta Way
Salt Lake City, Ut 84108
Map
801-583-2500
UNI Farmington Behavioral Health Clinic 291 South 200 West
Farmington, UT 84025
Map
801-213-3370