Patient Rating:

No Rating Available?

Timothy E. Graham, M.D.

Patient Rating:

No Rating Available?

Clinical Details

Phone Number Clinical Office Address
(801) 581-7761 Utah Diabetes Center
615 Arapeen Drive, Suite 100
Salt Lake City, UT 84108

Bio

Tim Graham, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry, and Nutrition at the University of Utah, and Medical Director of the Diabetes, Obesity, and Endocrinology Service Line for University of Utah Health Care. He is the Director of University of Utah's Diabetes and Heart Disease Prevention Program. He specializes in assessment and treatment of patients with Metabolic Syndrome, Prediabetes, and early stages of Diabetes, as well as those with increased risk for these conditions due to obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or family history. He also serves as Director of the Endocrinology Procedures Clinic at the George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, specializing in early detection and treatment of thyroid cancer and parathyroid gland abnormalities. He oversees NIH- and VA-funded research programs aimed at determining fundamental molecular and genetic causes of insulin resistance and related cardiovascular complications. He is an investigator in the Molecular Medicine Program. Dr. Graham is a board-certified Endocrinologist and Diabetologist; he trained at the Joslin Diabetes Clinic and Harvard Medical School.

Board Certification and Academic Information

Academic Departments Internal Medicine - Associate Professor
Biochemistry - Adjunct Associate Professor
Nutrition - Adjunct Assistant Professor
Academic Divisions Endocrinology and Metabolism
Board Certification American Board of Internal Medicine (Sub: Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism)

Academic Profile

Research Interests

  • Prediabetes
  • Mitophagy
  • Obesity
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Retinol-Binding Proteins
  • Mitochondrial Signaling
  • Lipid Peroxides
  • Autophagy
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type II
  • Insulin Resistance

Board Certification and Academic Information

Academic Departments Internal Medicine - Associate Professor
Biochemistry - Adjunct Associate Professor
Nutrition - Adjunct Assistant Professor
Academic Divisions Endocrinology and Metabolism
Board Certification American Board of Internal Medicine (Sub: Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism)

Academic Office Locations

Academic Office Phone Number Academic Office Address
(801) 585-3353 George and Dolores Eccles Institute of Human Genetics
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism & DIabetes
15 N 2030 E
Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Academic Bio

Tim Graham, MD, is a tenured Associate Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry, and Nutrition at the University of Utah. He is an Investigator in the Molecular Medicine Program at the University, and serves at the George E. Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He oversees NIH- and VA-funded research programs aimed at determining fundamental molecular and genetic causes of insulin resistance and related cardiovascular complications. Dr. Graham is a board-certified Endocrinologist and Diabetologist; he trained at the Joslin Diabetes Clinic and Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Graham's research expertise is in adipose tissue biology, with a particular interest in the role of adipose-secreted products that link obesity to regulation of whole body insulin action and glucose homeostasis. Recent work in his laboratory focuses on: (i) Stra6 and Stra6L, recently discovered receptors for the fat-secreted molecule, serum retinol binding protein (RBP4); Stra6L was discovered in Dr. Graham's laboratory at University of Utah; and (ii) the role of adipocyte autophagy and lysosomal function in regulating mitochondrial function, production of circulating lipid hydroperoxides, and lipolysis and adaptive thermogenesis.

Education

Education History

Type School Degree
Fellowship Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
Fellow
Research Fellow University of New Mexico
Biochemistry/Molecular Biology
Research Fellow
Residency University of New Mexico
Internal Medicine
Resident
Internship University of New Mexico
Internal Medicine
Intern
Professional Medical University of New Mexico
Medicine
M.D.
Undergraduate University of Pennsylvania
Pre-Medicine
Undergraduate University of New Mexico
Education
B.S.Ed.
Undergraduate St. John's College
Liberal Arts
B.A.

Publications

Selected Provider Publications

Journal Article

  1. Sargsyan A, Cai J, Fandino LB, Labasky ME, Forostyan T, Colosimo LK, Thompson SJ, and Graham TE (7/28/2015). Rapid parallel measurements of macroautophagy and mitophagy in mammalian cells using a single fluorescent biosensor (Manuscript SREP-15-06519A). Sci Rep, 5(12397), 1-11.
  2. Singleton JR, Marcus RL, Jackson JE, Lessard MK, Graham TE, Smith AG (2014). Exercise increases cutaneous nerve density in diabetic patients without neuropathy. Ann Clin Transl Neurol, 1(10), 844-849.
  3. Varvel SA, Pottala JV, Thiselton DL, Caffrey R, Dall T, Sasinowksi M, McConnell JP, Warnick R, Voros S, Graham TE (2014). Serum alpha-hydroxybutyrate (alpha-HB) predicts elevated 1-hour glucose levels and early-phase beta-cell dysfunction as shown by OGTT. BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, 2(1), e000038.
  4. Varvel SA, Pottala JV, Thiselton DL, Caffrey R, Dall T, Sasinowksi M, McConnell JP, Warnick R, Voros S, Graham TE (2014). Comprehensive biomarker testing of glycemia, insulin resistance, and beta cell function has greater sensitivity to detect diabetes risk than fasting glucose and HbA1c, and is associated with improved glycemic control in clinical practice. J Cardiovasc Transl Res, 7(6), 597-606.
  5. Bharath L, Mueller R, Li YY, Ruan T, Kunz D, Goodrich R, Mills T, Deeter L, Sargysan A, Anandh-Babu PV, Graham TE, Symons JD (2014). Impairment of autophagy in endothelial cells prevents shear-stress induced increases in nitric oxide bioavailability. Can J Physiol Pharmacol, 92(7), 605-612.
  6. Alapatt P, Guo F, Komanetsky SM, Wang, S, Cai, J, Sargsyan, A, Rodrguez Daz E, Bacon BT, Aryal P, Graham TE (2013). Liver retinol transporter and receptor for serum retinol-binding protein (RBP4). J Biol Chem, 288(2), 1250-65.
  7. Yang Q, Eskurza I, Kiernan UA, Phillips DA, Blher M, Graham TE, as corresponding author, Kahn BB (2012). Quantitative measurement of full-length and C-terminal proteolyzed RBP4 in serum of normal and insulin-resistant humans using a novel mass spectrometry immunoassay. Endocrinology, 153(3), 1519-27.
  8. Hammarstedt A, Graham TE, Kahn BB (2012). Adipose tissue dysregulation and reduced insulin sensitivity in non-obese individuals with enlarged abdominal adipose cells. Diabetol Metab Syndr, 4(1), 42-51.
  9. Preitner F, Mody N, Graham TE, Peroni OD, Kahn BB (2009). Long-term Fenretinide treatment prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 297(6), E1420-9.
  10. Goodman E, Graham TE, Dolan LM, Daniels SR, Goodman ER, Kahn BB (2009). The relationship of retinol binding protein 4 to changes in insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk in overweight black adolescents. J Pediatr, 154(1), 67-73.e1.
  11. Mody N, Graham TE, Tsuji Y, Yang Q, Kahn BB (2008). Decreased clearance of serum retinol-binding protein and elevated levels of transthyretin in insulin-resistant ob/ob mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 294(4), E785-93.
  12. Hammarstedt A, Pihlajamaki J, Graham TE, Kainulainen S, Kahn BB, Laakso M, Smith U (2008). High circulating levels of RBP4 and mRNA levels of aP2, PGC-1alpha and UCP-2 predict improvement in insulin sensitivity following pioglitazone treatment of drug-naive type 2 diabetic subjects. J Intern Med, 263(4), 440-9.
  13. Graham TE, Wason CJ, Bluher M, Kahn BB (2007). Shortcomings in methodology complicate measurements of serum retinol binding protein (RBP4) in insulin-resistant human subjects. Diabetologia, 50(4), 814-23.
  14. Balagopal P, Graham TE, Kahn BB, Altomare A, Funanage V, George D (2007). Reduction of elevated serum retinol binding protein in obese children by lifestyle intervention: association with subclinical inflammation. J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 92(5), 1971-4.
  15. Kloting N, Graham TE, Berndt J, Kralisch S, Kovacs P, Wason CJ, Fasshauer M, Schon MR, Stumvoll M, Bluher M, Kahn BB (2007). Serum retinol-binding protein is more highly expressed in visceral than in subcutaneous adipose tissue and is a marker of intra-abdominal fat mass. Cell Metab, 6(1), 79-87.
  16. Yan QW, Yang Q, Mody N, Graham TE, Hsu CH, Xu Z, Houstis NE, Kahn BB, Rosen ED (2007). The adipokine lipocalin 2 is regulated by obesity and promotes insulin resistance. Diabetes, 56(10), 2533-40.
  17. Kovacs P, Geyer M, Berndt J, Kloting N, Graham TE, Bottcher Y, Enigk B, Tonjes A, Schleinitz D, Schon MR, Kahn BB, Bluher M, Stumvoll M (2007). Effects of genetic variation in the human retinol binding protein-4 gene (RBP4) on insulin resistance and fat depot-specific mRNA expression. Diabetes, 56(12), 3095-100.
  18. Graham TE, Yang Q, Bluher M, Hammarstedt A, Ciaraldi TP, Henry RR, Wason CJ, Oberbach A, Jansson PA, Smith U, Kahn BB (2006). Retinol-binding protein 4 and insulin resistance in lean, obese, and diabetic subjects. N Engl J Med, 354(24), 2552-63.
  19. Turchin A, Wiebe DA, Seely EW, Graham T, Longo W, Soiffer R (2005). Severe hypercholesterolemia mediated by lipoprotein X in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease of the liver. Bone Marrow Transplant, 35, 85-9.
  20. Yang Q, Graham TE, Mody N, Preitner F, Peroni OD, Zabolotny JM, Kotani K, Quadro L, Kahn BB (2005). Serum retinol binding protein 4 contributes to insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Nature, 436(7049), 356-62.
  21. Graham TE, Qiao Z, Dorin RI (2004). Dexras1 inhibits adenylyl cyclase. Biochem Biophys Res Commun, 316(2), 307-12.
  22. Graham TE, Prossnitz ER, Dorin RI (2002). Dexras1/AGS-1 inhibits signal transduction from the Gi-coupled formyl peptide receptor to Erk-1/2 MAP kinases. J Biol Chem, 277(13), 10876-82.
  23. Graham TE, Key TA, Kilpatrick K, Dorin RI (2001). Dexras1/AGS-1, a steroid hormone-induced guanosine triphosphate-binding protein, inhibits 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-stimulated secretion in AtT-20 corticotroph cells. Endocrinology, 142(6), 2631-40.
  24. Graham TE, Pfeiffer JR, Lee RJ, Kusewitt DF, Martinez AM, Foutz T, Wilson BS, Oliver JM (1998). MEK and ERK activation in ras-disabled RBL-2H3 mast cells and novel roles for geranylgeranylated and farnesylated proteins in Fc epsilonRI-mediated signaling. J Immunol, 161(12), 6733-44.
  25. Butkerait P, Zheng Y, Hallak H, Graham TE, Miller HA, Burris KD, Molinoff PB, Manning DR (1995). Expression of the human 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor in Sf9 cells. Reconstitution of a coupled phenotype by co-expression of mammalian G protein subunits. J Biol Chem, 270(31), 18691-9.

Review

  1. Boudina S, Graham TE (2014). Mitochondrial function/dysfunction in white adipose tissue (EXPPHYSIOL/2014/081414 published electronically). [Review]. Experimental Physiology.
  2. Graham TE, Kahn BB (2007). Tissue-specific alterations of glucose transport and molecular mechanisms of intertissue communication in obesity and type 2 diabetes. [Review]. Horm Metab Res, 39(10), 717-21.

Book Chapter

  1. Graham TE, Abel ED (2013). Autophagy in Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome. In Roberta Gottlieb (Ed.), Autophagy in Health and Disease (1, pp. 117-139). London, New York, San Diego: Academic Press – Elsevier.
  2. Wilson BS, Barker SB, Graham TE, Pfeiffer JR, Oliver JM (1998). Phosphoinositide-Derived Second Messengers in Fc-epsilon-RI Signaling: PI 3-Kinase Products Control Membrane Topography and the Translocation and Activation of PLC-gamma-1 in Antigen-Stimulated Mast Cells. In Razin E, Pecht I, Rivera J (Ed.), Signal Transduction in Mast Cells and Basophils. Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit Series (pp. 191-201). Austin: R.G. Landes Biosciences Publishers.

Letter

  1. Graham TE, Smith U, Kahn BB (2006). Retinol Binding-Protein 4 and insulin resistance [Letter to the editor]. N Engl J Med, 355, 1394-5.

Patent

  1. Kahn BB, Yang Q, Graham TE, Peroni O (2009). RBP4 in insulin sensitivity/resistance, diabetes, and obesity. Currently under licensing agreement to Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. U.S. Patent No. 7,553,631. Washington, D.C.:U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Clinical Trials

Video & News