Jan 29, 2015 1:00 AM

Author: Lori Bonham


The older you get the more you may be at risk for broken bones.

According to a recent study, the risk of broken bones increases in both weigh gain and loss in older women. The findings challenge the belief that weight gain shields older women from fractures.

“There are a lot of variables that contribute to risk fractures,” said Patty Trela, physical therapist and Build a Bone program coordinator. “I recommend individuals assess their activity level and exercise regimen.”

Studies show that being up on your feet at least four hours per day has a large impact on bone health and walking four hours a week can reduce your risk of fracture 41 percent. 

Here are some tips to keep your bones healthy:

  • Wear a pedometer: People are surprised when they first use a pedometer regularly to find out how active they really are; it is usually more or less than what they thought.
  • Weightlifting: It is important to incorporate weight lifting to your exercise schedule at least two days a week. The resistance should be challenging enough that you don't want to do more than 10 reps and only one set is needed. 
  • Balance exercises: do at least two times per week and they should be challenging but safe. 

 It is more important to keep your body as strong as possible and your balance as good as possible to minimize risk of falls than to be concerned about weight changes, Trela said.

To learn more about how to keep your bones healthy attend a Build a Bone class, which is includes two-hour classes where you will learn how to care for and strengthen your bones and optimize your bone health. For more information about Build a Bone classes or to schedule a bone density test please call 801-587-7005. 


Lori Bonham

Lori Bonham is a marketing manager at University of Utah Health Care. Follow her on Twitter: @bonhaml.

bone health aging

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