Dr. Moshirfar describes CLE, what it is used for, and who is a candidate for it.


Clear lens extraction (CLE) is similar to cataract surgery. Both involve the removal of the eye's natural lens, replacing it with a synthetic lens. In most cases, the synthetic lens corrects for distance vision, usually requiring a pair of reading glasses for close work. Different synthetic lens replacement options include correction for both distance and near vision as well as lenses that can correct for astigmatism.

This procedure may be used for patients who have farsightedness or nearsightedness combined with astigmatism. Presbyopic patients can also benefit.

Surgical Options

There are four surgical options that your specialist could use when implanting the clear lenses. Read more about the four surgical options for CLE.

Pros & Cons in Choosing Clear Lens Extraction


  • CLEs are an alternative for patients who are not eligible for laser surgery.
  • The correct high myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness) that is out of the range of laser surgery and phakic IOLs.
  • You will no longer develop a cataract as the lens has been removed and replaced by a clear implant.
  • You will experience minimal postoperative discomfort.


  • You might lose your ability to accommodate; you may need reading glasses for near vision.
  • The placement procedure is more invasive than laser refractive surgery; it is done in the operating room with topical and/or general anesthesia.
  • It is more difficult to remove than phakic IOLs.

Balamurali K. Ambati, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Bala Ambati specializes in cataract extraction, lifestyle lens implants, LASIK, cornea transplants, keratoprosthesis (artificial cornea), PRK, and other complex procedures of the cornea and anterior segment of the eye at the John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. He joined the Moran faculty as a physician and researcher i... Read More

Amy Lin, M.D.

Amy Lin, MD, specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of corneal and anterior segment diseases at the Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and at the Moran Eye Center at the Midvalley Health Center. Her interests include corneal transplantation, anterior segment reconstruction, cataract surgery (including advanced technolo... Read More

Mark D. Mifflin, M.D.

Mark D. Mifflin specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of corneal and anterior segment eye diseases. His expertise includes all types of corneal transplantation, cataract surgery, and vision correction using lasers, intra-ocular lenses, and conductive keratoplasty. Dr. Mifflin is the Residency Program Director and Education Director for ... Read More

Geoffrey C. Tabin, M.D.

Geoffrey Tabin, M.D. is a Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Co-Director of the Outreach Division at the John A. Moran Eye Center and University of Utah and; specializing in cornea, cataract and refractive surgery. Dr. Tabin graduated from Yale College, earned a M.A. in philosophy at Oxford as a Marshall Scholar, and then his M.D. f... Read More

John A. Moran Eye Center 65 Mario Capecchi Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
(801) 581-2352
Midvalley Health Center 243 E 6100 S
Murray, UT 84107
(801) 585-3937
Redstone Health Center 1743 W. Redstone Center Dr.
Park City, UT 84098
(435) 658-9262
Redwood Health Center 1525 West 2100 South
Salt Lake City UT 84119
(801) 213-8841
South Jordan Health Center 5126 W. Daybreak Parkway
South Jordan, UT 84095
(801) 213-4500