Apr 01, 2021

Improving Cancer Care and Outcomes in Our Communities

At its core, Huntsman Cancer Institute is dedicated to creating an environment that not only promotes—but insists upon—equity, diversity, and inclusion. Read highlights of noteworthy programs and research from the Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program that advance HCI’s quest to create a cancer-free frontier for all communities, no matter their location, income, or insurance status.

Mar 23, 2021

New Guidance for Clinical Trial Participation by Cancer Patients Receiving a COVID-19 Vaccination

An international group of cancer clinical research experts reported new recommendations that receiving a COVID-19 vaccination should not preclude a cancer patient from participating on a clinical trial. Huntsman Cancer Institute physician-scientist and professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah, Neeraj Agarwal, MD, was part of this newly formed group who reviewed the data and provided recommendations to patients, doctors, research centers, and the pharmaceutical research industry on this critical, emerging issue.

Mar 03, 2021

Utah Researchers Illuminate Potential Precursors of Blood Cancers

Utah researchers report significant new insights into the development of blood cancers. Comparing DNA data in people with and without blood disorders, the researchers discovered genetic mutations in about 2% of the presumably healthy participants that were identical to those frequently observed in the cancer patients. These findings provide new clues about mutations that may initiate cancer development and those that may help cancer progress.

Jan 20, 2021

American Society of Hematology Selects Ami Patel to Receive a 2021 ASH Scholar Award

HCI physician-scientist Ami Patel, MD, has been selected by the American Society of Hematology (ASH) to receive a Scholar Award for her research in leukemia. ASH Scholar Awards are one of ASH’s most prestigious research award programs. They provide financial support to fellows and junior faculty who have dedicated their careers to advancing the field of hematology research as they transition from training programs to careers as independent investigators.

Jan 13, 2021

Talks with Docs: Robert Judson-Torres, Melanoma Researcher

“Any human disease is so complicated that in order to really have the best care for patients, as well as sort of pushing the envelope on research, you need experts in all of it,” says melanoma researcher Robert Judson-Torres, PhD. In this Talks with Docs video, he explains why he wanted to become a cancer researcher, what he hopes his melanoma research will accomplish, and why Indiana Jones is his inspiration.

Dec 18, 2020

Huntsman Cancer Institute Appoints Gertz and Oliver as Cancer Center Research Program Leaders

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah announced Jay Gertz, PhD, and Trudy G. Oliver, PhD, have accepted invitations to serve as co-leaders of Huntsman Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center research programs. Gertz will serve alongside Jared Rutter, PhD, as co-leader of the Nuclear Control of Cell Growth and Differentiation Program. Oliver will serve alongside Sheri Holmen, PhD, as co-leader of the Cell Response and Regulation Program.

Dec 04, 2020

Fighting to Improve Outcomes in Gastrointestinal Cancers by Understanding Risk Factors and Related Chronic Diseases

Sheetal Hardikar, MBBS, PhD, MPH studies multiple aspects of gastrointestinal cancers, particularly cancers of the esophagus and colon. Over the last few years, she has focused her work on understanding the complex relationship between diabetes and cancer. The 5 For The Fight Fellowship will provide her a whole new set of resources to help accelerate her progress in improving outcomes for people with cancer.

Dec 03, 2020

Huntsman Cancer Institute Researchers Identify Promising Drug Combination for Melanoma

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have identified a potential drug combination to treat uveal melanoma, a type of eye cancer. Lead author Amanda Truong, trainee in the McMahon Lab at HCI, explains uveal melanoma patients frequently have changes in genes called GNAQ and GNA11, which are key targets for these drugs. This study was published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.