Overview

What to Expect

What to Expect

X-Ray

You may be asked to wear a hospital gown and remove all jewelry and metal objects, such as watches, necklaces, eyeglasses, and the like. Depending on the type of X-ray, you may be required to stand, sit, or lie down. The technologist will position you correctly and provide instruction for the best image. It is important that you remain still as the picture is taken. Depending on the type of exam, X-rays can take five to 30 minutes.

Fluoroscopy

You will be asked to wear a hospital gown and remove all jewelry and metal objects, such as watches, necklaces, eyeglasses, and the like.

Fluoroscopy procedures are real time X-rays, allowing doctors to see functions of the body they wouldn’t otherwise be able to see. You may be asked to complete simple tasks such as drinking while images are taken. You may also be asked to stand or lie down. A radiologist or assistant will be in the room to give instructions during the procedure, which can take 30 minutes to two hours.

How to Prepare For Your Imaging Procedure

48 Hour Diet-Restriction Instructions

Your physician is preparing you for an examination that requires thorough clearing of the intestinal tract. Be sure to follow all instructions or the entire examination may have to be repeated.

Important: A high fluid intake is essential to the success of this regimen. You MUST drink lots of fluid. Drink only black coffee, plain tea, clear fruit juice (no pulp), soft drinks, or water at the times indicated below. NO MILK OR CREAM!!!

48 Hours Before Examination or Procedure:
*LOW RESIDUE foods only - Such as white bread, cream of wheat, meat (not fried), chicken, turkey, ham, and all defined liquids are allowed.

AVOID - Raw fruits, raw vegetables, nuts, raisins, whole-wheat products, cold cuts, cheeses, hotdogs, and meat fats.

24 Hours Prior to Examination:
LIQUIDS ONLY!! This may include soup, bouillon with the fat skimmed off, plain gelatin, and clear liquids.

NO SOLID FOODS PERMITTED. Starting midnight the night before procedure, NPO (nothing by mouth), no water, gum chewing, or cigarettes. Prescription medications may be taken as scheduled with a small glass of water.

*Residue refers to the total amount of undigested materials that make up feces. For example, milk does not contain fiber, but it adds to fecal residue. The main source of residue is fiber in foods like whole-grain breads and cereals, seeds and nuts, dried fruits, and the stalks and skins of fruits and vegetables.

Barium Enema or Gastrograffin Enema (Water Soluable)

Procedure: A catheter is placed into the rectum and a radiopaque contrast is injected into the large bowel. This contrast shows the anatomy of the large bowel and any abnormalities. Typically, the patient may feel discomfort but no pain. The barium may stay in a patient’s system for as many as five days.

Duration: With air contrast and without: 60 minutes
Gastrograffin: 45 minutes
Patients that have an ileostomy/colostomy: 30 minutes

Preparation:

Adults - Patient must pick up Lo So preparation kit and 48 hour diet instructions
Colostomy patients – No preparation

Pediatric patients:

Years Instructions
0–2 years NPO 2–4 hours prior to exam. Check with nurse.
2–6 years Half suppository at night and half suppository in morning; NPO at least four hours prior.
6–12 years Half bottle magnesium citrate on dulclax tablet and one suppository; NPO after midnight.
12–14 Use the preparation for the adults unless patient weighs less than 100 lbs.; then use 6–12 hour preparation

Baclofen Injection

Duration: 30–60 minutes
Preparation: None

Cystogram

Procedure: A urinary catheter is placed into the bladder through the urethra. A contrast is injected into the bladder and a series of films are taken. This exam is used to look for bladder abnormalities, reflux of urine into the ureters, and neurogenic bladders.
Duration: 30–60 minutes

Preparation: No preparation unless in conjunction with an IVP then the patient must use the Lo So preparation kit and follow the 48 hour diet. When scheduling schedule the cystogram with the IVP to follow.

Fistulagram

Procedure: A catheter is used to fill the sinus tract with a contrast medium. Determine the direction and depth of the sinus tract.
Duration: 30 minutes

Preparation: None

Hyserosalpingoram (HSG)

Procedure: Contrast is injected into the uterus and fallopian tubes to see any abnormalities or blockages of the fallopian tubes. The exam is performed by the patient’s OB/GYN doctor.
Duration: 30 minutes

Preparation: None

Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP)

Procedure: A dye is injected into the patient’s veins which are filtered through the kidney while x-rays are taken to show function and any pathology of kidneys, ureters, and bladder.
Duration: 60 minutes

Preparation: Patients must have bun and creatinine level drawn within the last month if patient is over 60 or if they only have one kidney. Patient must speak to referring doctor if allergic to iodine. If patient is taking glucophage or metaformin, they are not to take these medications for 48 hours AFTER procedure.

Adults – Tridate preparation kit and 48 hour diet
Colostomy patients – Tridate preparation kit without suppository

Pediatric (IVP)

Years Instructions
0–2 Years NPO two to four hours prior to exam.
2–6 Years Half suppository at night half suppository in the morning; NPO at least four hours prior.
6–12 Years Half bottle magnesium citrate, one duclax tablet, and one suppository; NPO after midnight.
12–14 Years Use adult preparation unless weight is under 100 lbs; then use six to 12-year-old preparation.

Lumbar Puncture

Procedure: Patient will be lying down on stomach while a local anesthetic is administered around the site of the injection. A spinal needle is inserted by the radiologist. The needle is guided into the spinal column and fluid is drawn under fluoro guidance.
Duration: 30–60 minutes

Preparation: Patient should plan on spending two hours in the hospital. Patient needs to be NPO and a driver to take them home and remain bed rest for the remainder of day. If patient is on blood thinners (Coumadin/Aspirin), they need to be off of either for five days prior to exam. Labs also need to be done.

Sinogram/Fistulagram

Procedure: Contrast is injected into the sinus tract.

Preparation: No preparation.

Small Bowel, Follow-Through *ONLY*

Procedure: Patient drinks barium, and abdominal images are taken to follow the barium through the small intestines.

Duration: One to three hours

Preparation: 48 hour preparation (no preparation for ileostomy patients)

Sniff Test

Duration: 30 minutes

Trigeminal Nerve Injection (Glycerol Injection)

Procedure: Gylcerol solution is injected into the facial area surrounding the trigeminal nerve to stop the pain. Anesthesia will be given.

Duration: 90 minutes

Preparation: Preparation is given by neurosurgery.

T Tube Cholangigram

Procedure: A small amount of contrast is placed in a previously surgically-placed tube. A series of x-rays are taken to see if there are any blockages or abnormal pathology. Usually done in the OR.

Preparation: No preparation is needed.

UGI, UGI With SBFT and SBFT Only

Procedure: A small amount of contrast is placed in a previously surgical placed tube. A series of x-rays are taken to see if there are any blockages or abnormal pathology. Usually done in the OR.

Duration: 30 minutes to three hours

Preparation: Patient needs to follow 48 hour diet with restrictions for UGI with SBFT. Patient needs to be NPO after midnight for the UGI only and SBFT only.

VCUG (Voiding Cystourethrogram)

Procedure: A urinary catheter is placed into the bladder via the urethra. A contrast is injected into the bladder and a series of films are taken. This exam is used to look for urinary abnormalities, reflux, or urine into the ureter and neurogenic bladders following the filling of the bladder. The patient is asked to void out the contrast. Images are taken while the patient voids.

Duration: With or without a catheter, 30 minutes

Preparation: No preparation is needed unless in combination with an IVP; then patient must use the Tridate preparation kit.