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Karl A. Sanders

Karl A. Sanders, MD

Languages spoken: English

Clinical Locations

University of Utah Hospital

Pulmonary, Clinic 3
801-581-7806
  • Dr. Karl Sanders is a member of the Division of Respiratory, Critical Care and Occupational Pulmonary Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine. He serves as the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Training Program Director at the University of Utah. He is an associate professor of medicine (clinical) within the Department of Medicine. Dr. Sanders coordinates the efforts of the Division in its mission to educate and train future clinicians, investigators, and educators in the practice of pulmonary and critical care medicine.

    Dr. Sanders is engaged in education of medical students, house officers and fellows in clinical aspects of pulmonary and critical care medicine. All of his clinical work occurs at the George E. Wahlen VA Medical center where he cares for critically ill individuals in the medical intensive care unit and sees patients with a variety of pulmonary diseases in the outpatient clinics.

    Specialties

  • Dr. Karl Sanders is a member of the Division of Respiratory, Critical Care and Occupational Pulmonary Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine. He serves as the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Training Program Director at the University of Utah. He is an associate professor of medicine (clinical) within the Department of Medicine. Dr. Sanders coordinates the efforts of the Division in its mission to educate and train future clinicians, investigators, and educators in the practice of pulmonary and critical care medicine.

    Dr. Sanders is engaged in education of medical students, house officers and fellows in clinical aspects of pulmonary and critical care medicine. All of his clinical work occurs at the George E. Wahlen VA Medical center where he cares for critically ill individuals in the medical intensive care unit and sees patients with a variety of pulmonary diseases in the outpatient clinics.

    Board Certification and Academic Information

    Academic Departments Internal Medicine -Primary
    Academic Divisions Public Health

    Education history

    Fellowship Pulmonary Medicine - University of Utah School of Medicine Fellow
    Internal Medicine - University of Minnesota Hospitals Resident
    Professional Medical Medicine - University of Kansas M.D.
    History - University of Kansas B.A.

    Selected Publications

    Journal Article

    1. Kwon OS, Decker ST, Zhao J, Hoidal JR, Heuckstadt T, Sanders KA, Richardson RS, Layec G (2022). The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in mitochondrial function and cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress. Free Radic Biol Med, 195, 261-269. (Read full article)
    2. Warren KJ, Deering-Rice C, Huecksteadt T, Trivedi S, Venosa A, Reilly C, Sanders K, Clayton F, Wyatt TA, Poole JA, Heller NM, Leung D, Paine R 3rd (2023). Steady-state estradiol triggers a unique innate immune response to allergen resulting in increased airway resistance. Biol Sex Differ, 14(1), 2. (Read full article)
    3. Trivedi S, Labuz D, Deering-Rice CE, Kim CU, Christensen H, Aamodt S, Huecksteadt T, Sanders K, Warren KJ (2022). IL-33 induces NF-κB activation in ILC2 that can be suppressed by in vivo and ex vivo 17β-estradiol. Front Allergy, 3, 1062412. (Read full article)
    4. Wuren T, Huecksteadt T, Beck E, Warren K, Hoidal J, Ostrand-Rosenberg S, Sanders K (2021). The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) decreases survival of tumor-bearing mice by enhancing the generation of lung metastasis-associated myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Cell Immunol, 365, 104379. (Read full article)
    5. Decker ST, Kwon OS, Zhao J, Hoidal JR, Heuckstadt T, Richardson RS, Sanders KA, Layec G (2021). Skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations induced by long-term cigarette smoke exposure. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab, 321(1), E80-E89. (Read full article)
    6. DeCato TW, Burk RE, Mir-Kasimov M, Shigeoka JW, Hegewald MJ, Sanders K (2018). A 73-Year-Old Man With Progressive Whole Body Subcutaneous Gas After Pleural Catheter Removal. Chest, 155(4), e97-e100. (Read full article)
    7. Sturrock A, Woller D, Freeman A, Sanders K, Paine R 3rd (2018). Consequences of Hypoxia for the Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Response. J Immunol, 201(11), 3411-3420. (Read full article)
    8. Reynolds PR, Schmitt RE, Kasteler SD, Sturrock A, Sanders K, Bierhaus A, Nawroth PP, Paine R 3rd, Hoidal JR (2009). Receptors for advanced glycation end-products targeting protect against hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol, 42(5), 545-51. (Read full article)
    9. Ismail S, Sturrock A, Wu P, Cahill B, Norman K, Huecksteadt T, Sanders K, Kennedy T, Hoidal J (2008). NOX4 mediates hypoxia-induced proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: the role of autocrine production of transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol, 296(3), L489-99. (Read full article)
    10. Farmer CG, Uriona TJ, Olsen DB, Steenblik M, Sanders K (2008). The right-to-left shunt of crocodilians serves digestion. Physiol Biochem Zool, 81(2), 125-37. (Read full article)
    11. Sturrock A, Huecksteadt TP, Norman K, Sanders K, Murphy TM, Chitano P, Wilson K, Hoidal JR, Kennedy TP (2007). Nox4 mediates TGF-beta1-induced retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation, proliferation, and hypertrophy in human airway smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol, 292(6), L1543-55. (Read full article)
    12. He L, Dinger B, Sanders K, Hoidal J, Obeso A, Stensaas L, Fidone S, Gonzalez C (2005). Effect of p47phox gene deletion on ROS production and oxygen sensing in mouse carotid body chemoreceptor cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol, 289(6), L916-24. (Read full article)
    13. Yang T, Zhang A, Honeggar M, Kohan DE, Mizel D, Sanders K, Hoidal JR, Briggs JP, Schnermann JB (2005). Hypertonic induction of COX-2 in collecting duct cells by reactive oxygen species of mitochondrial origin. J Biol Chem, 280(41), 34966-73. (Read full article)
    14. He L, Chen J, Dinger B, Sanders K, Sundar K, Hoidal J, Fidone S (2003). Carotid body chemoreceptor activity in mice deficient in selected subunits of NADPH oxidase. Adv Exp Med Biol, 536, 41-6. (Read full article)
    15. He L, Chen J, Dinger B, Sanders K, Sundar K, Hoidal J, Fidone S (2001). Characteristics of carotid body chemosensitivity in NADPH oxidase-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol, 282(1), C27-33. (Read full article)

    Review

    1. Ostrand-Rosenberg S, Huecksteadt T, Sanders K (2023). The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) and Its Ligands S100A8/A9 and High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 (HMGB1) Are Key Regulators of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells. [Review]. Cancers (Basel), 15(4). (Read full article)
    2. Dinger B, He L, Chen J, Liu X, Gonzalez C, Obeso A, Sanders K, Hoidal J, Stensaas L, Fidone S (2006). The role of NADPH oxidase in carotid body arterial chemoreceptors. [Review]. Respir Physiol Neurobiol, 157(1), 45-54. (Read full article)
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