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Larissa A. McGarrity

Larissa A. McGarrity, PhD

Languages spoken: English

Clinical Locations

Craig H. Neilsen Rehabilitation Hospital

Rehabilitation Psychology Clinic
801-581-2267

Sugar House Health Center

Medical Weight Management Program
801-581-2000
  • Larissa McGarrity, PhD is a clinical psychologist in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) where she provides psychological evaluations and treatment for patients seen by the Comprehensive Weight Management and Bariatric Surgery Programs, as well as clinical coverage for the Inpatient Medical Rehabilitation Unit. She also supervises trainees to perform these clinical services.



    Dr. McGarrity is Chief of the Section of PM&R Psychology, leading a team of 8 psychologists across 3 subspecialty areas (Rehab, Health/Bariatric, and Neuro Psychology). She also directs ambulatory operations for the Health/Bariatric Psychology Service.



    Dr. McGarrity’s clinical and translational research program is focused on psychological health for individuals with severe obesity, including the development of interventions to minimize risk factors, optimize resilience, and counter stigma in this population. She is currently funded by an NIH/NCATS K12 Institutional Career Development Award. The associated project is a pilot randomized controlled trial testing feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a dyadic positive psychology intervention she developed called ReConnect (Reimagining Us in the Context of Bariatric Surgery), designed to improve psychosocial outcomes for patients and their partners in the years following bariatric surgery.

    Dr. McGarrity’s services are available by referral only

  • Larissa McGarrity, PhD is a clinical psychologist in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) where she provides psychological evaluations and treatment for patients seen by the Comprehensive Weight Management and Bariatric Surgery Programs, as well as clinical coverage for the Inpatient Medical Rehabilitation Unit. She also supervises trainees to perform these clinical services.



    Dr. McGarrity is Chief of the Section of PM&R Psychology, leading a team of 8 psychologists across 3 subspecialty areas (Rehab, Health/Bariatric, and Neuro Psychology). She also directs ambulatory operations for the Health/Bariatric Psychology Service.



    Dr. McGarrity’s clinical and translational research program is focused on psychological health for individuals with severe obesity, including the development of interventions to minimize risk factors, optimize resilience, and counter stigma in this population. She is currently funded by an NIH/NCATS K12 Institutional Career Development Award. The associated project is a pilot randomized controlled trial testing feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a dyadic positive psychology intervention she developed called ReConnect (Reimagining Us in the Context of Bariatric Surgery), designed to improve psychosocial outcomes for patients and their partners in the years following bariatric surgery.

    Dr. McGarrity’s services are available by referral only

    Board Certification and Academic Information

    Academic Departments Pharmacotherapy -Primary

    Education history

    Postdoctoral Fellowship Clinical Psychology, Rehabilitation Psychology - University of Utah School of Medicine Postdoctoral Fellow
    Clinical Psychology, Behavioral Medicine Track - Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Resident
    Doctoral Training Clinical Psychology, Specialization: Health - University of Utah M.S., Ph.D.
    Major: Psychology; Minor: Sociology - University of Texas at Austin B.A. (Hons)

    Selected Publications

    Journal Article

    1. McGarrity, L A, Shepardson, R L, Carey, K B, Carey, M P (2022). Sexual assault predicts unhealthy weight management among college women: A longitudinal, prospective study. . J Am Coll Health, 26, 1-8.
    2. Gordon, E L, Terrill, A L, Smith, T W, Ibele, A R, Martinez, P L, McGarrity, L A (2022). Overvaluation of shape and weight (not BMI) associated with depressive symptoms and binge eating symptoms pre- and post-bariatric surgery. Obes Surg, 32, 2272-2279.
    3. McGarrity, LA, Terrill A, Martinez PL, Ibele A R, Morrow, EH, Volckmann, ET, Smith, T (2022). Role of resilience in psychological health among bariatric surgery patients. . Obes Surg, (32), 792-800.
    4. Martinez PL, McGarrity LA, Turner NA, Volckmann ET, Kohler RM, Morrow EH, Ibele AR (2021). Self-Pay Payer Status Predicts Long-Term Loss to Follow-Up After Bariatric Surgery. Obes Surg, 31(4), 1590-1596. (Read full article)
    5. McGarrity, LA, Huebner, DM, Perry, NS, Spivey, LA, Smith, TW (2021). Cariovascular and cortisol responses to experimentally induced minority stress. . Health Psychol, (40), 316-326.
    6. Morrow E, Chang JW, Biber J, Miller M, McGarrity LA, Glasgow R, Volckmann E, Ibele A, Brooke B (2020). Prospective collection of PROMIS physical function measure demonstrates significant improvement after bariatric surgery. Obes Surg, 30, 1898-1903.
    7. McGarrity LA, Huebner DM, Smith TW, Suchy Y (2019). Minority Stress, Emotion Regulation, and Executive Function: An Experimental Investigation of Gay and Lesbian Adults. Pers Soc Psychol Bull, 46(3), 365-376. (Read full article)
    8. McGarrity LA, Perry NS, Derbidge CM, Trapp SK, Terrill AL, Smith TW, Ibele AR, MacKenzie JJ (2019). Associations Between Approach and Avoidance Coping, Psychological Distress, and Disordered Eating Among Candidates for Bariatric Surgery. Obes Surg, 29(11), 3596-3604. (Read full article)
    9. McGarrity LA, Huebner DM, Nemeroff CJ, Proeschold-Bell RJ (2017). Longitudinal Predictors of Behavioral Intentions and HIV Service Use Among Men Who Have Sex with Men. Prev Sci, 19(4), 507-515. (Read full article)
    10. Huebner DM, McGarrity LA, Smith TW, Perry NS, Suchy Y (2018). Changes in Executive Function Following a Stressful Interpersonal Task Are Associated With Condomless Anal Intercourse Among Men Who Have Sex With Men. Ann Behav Med, 52(5), 406-411. (Read full article)
    11. Rosen RK, McGarrity LA, Salmoirago-Blotcher E, Rich C, Rana A, Carey MP (2017). Telephone-Delivered Mindfulness Training for People Living with HIV: A Qualitative 360° Inquiry. AIDS Behav, 21(11), 3194-3201. (Read full article)
    12. Sewell KK, McGarrity LA, Strassberg DS (2016). Sexual Behavior, Definitions of Sex, and the Role of Self-Partner Context Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults. J Sex Res, 54(7), 825-831. (Read full article)
    13. McGarrity LA, Senn TE, Walsh JL, Scott-Sheldon LAJ, Carey KB, Carey MP (2017). Psychological Distress Moderates the Intention-Behavior Association for Sexual Partner Concurrency Among Adults. AIDS Behav, 21(6), 1567-1571. (Read full article)
    14. McGarrity LA, Huebner DM (2014). Behavioral intentions to HIV test and subsequent testing: the moderating role of sociodemographic characteristics. Health Psychol, 33(4), 396-400. (Read full article)
    15. McGarrity LA, Huebner DM (2014). Is being out about sexual orientation uniformly healthy? The moderating role of socioeconomic status in a prospective study of gay and bisexual men. Ann Behav Med, 47(1), 28-38. (Read full article)
    16. McGarrity LA (2014). Socioeconomic status as context for minority stress and health disparities among lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals. Psychol Sex Orientat Gend Divers, 1, 383-07.
    17. Huebner DM, Rullo JE, Thoma BC, McGarrity LA, Mackenzie J (2013). Piloting Lead with Love: a film-based intervention to improve parents' responses to their lesbian, gay, and bisexual children. J Prim Prev, 34(5), 359-69. (Read full article)
    18. McGarrity LA, Huebner DM, McKinnon RK (2013). Putting stigma in context: Do perceptions of group stigma interact with personally experienced discrimination to predict mental health? 16, 688-702.
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