Oct 20, 2014 11:45 PM

Author: Office of Public Affairs


Halloween is quickly approaching, and that means ghosts, goblins, haunted houses and, for some kids, nightmares.

Nightmares usually occur late night to early morning, when sleep is deepest. They can occur for no apparent reason or may be prompted by a number of things, including anxiety, life changes (e.g., starting school or parents getting a divorce) or watching a scary program on TV.

While parents can’t protect their kids from nightmares, they can set the stage for a peaceful and happy night of rest by following these four tips.

Should you let your child sleep in your bed after a nightmare? Benjamin Chan, MD, a child psychiatrist at the University of Utah Health, provides his insight on this episode of The Scope

nightmares sleep parenting

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